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Acetabulum and Clavicle, crashed on my bicycle (Page 1)

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Hi, I've been reading a couple of other threads and thought I would post my experience.

I'm a 61 year old male, alpine skier and racer and active in many other ways including construction, my own firewood @ 6 cords a year, float tube fly fishing, bicycling, etc. I did my right clavicle and Acetabulum and a half yard of road rash on every knuckle and every joint on my right side and forehead in a road bicycle crash on August 16th going about 30-32 mph. I actually hustled some folks to take me to the ER 4 miles away after dropping my bike off at home. After looking at my x-rays and cat scan our local orthopedic surgeon felt it was best to ship me out just in case my Acetabulum needed surgery. So after cleaning up my abrasions and x-rays they air flighted me up to Reno through the afternoon thunderstorms where surgeons specializing in the pelvis would also determine that my fracture of the Acetabulum did not need surgery (thank you lorda I settled in.

Having my right arm and leg both labeled non weight bearing, banged up ribs, a tender Patella and very tender patches of road rash from the knee to forehead I was bed ridden for the first couple of days. After two days and the x-ray showed my clavicle was in poor position I had them plate it for 2 reasons. 1 faster repair so I will be able to use crutches sooner and 2 the displacement was pinching tissue and killing me even with drip pain meds. The next morning I felt a huge improvement in discomfort from my Clavicle repair. I was limited to 2# lifting and no pushing or pulling.

I had a 2 1/2 week check-up and x-ray indicating I am still stable in the Acetabulum and they gave me a 'very light duty' OK to use my right arm on the wheel chair wheel (a little). This gives me a little independent mobility around the house and deck which is a huge relief for my wife.

My fractured Acetabulum has approx. 1mm displacement and is still stable at 2 1/2 weeks so surgery is not necessary, but I will be non-weight bearing for 10-12 weeks. I reduced my Oxycodone to 1 pill and 1 Advil 3-4 times a day about 1 week after my accident and quit after 3 weeks. After reading about NSAIDS possibly inhibiting bone growth I am now doing Tylenol 3 times a day but may quit shortly as the pain has been minimal even while carefully moving around.

My life was from the wheel chair to the sofa and back to the shower and back until last night when I did the 'left side shuffle' up stairs to hit my bed for the first time in 3 1/2 weeks. I didn't sleep real great and that is no different than the sofa, but being in my own bed again is a blessing and I did the 'left side shuffle' back down stairs this morning with success and no discomfort on my non bearing side so I will continue with this big improvement in my recovery.

My next appt. with the doctors is the 28th of Sept and I am hoping for a release to use crutches and start some real PT, and maybe get some light weight bearing as I am on toe touch only. I was fit and strong going in and I expect that to be a big advantage coming out of this. I have been doing some light exercises from the sheet given by the PT in Reno and will be hitting these exercises harder as I await my Orthopedist's next decisions regarding weight bearing and physical therapy.

I'm not really new to injury but have been fortunate over the years for the amount and pushing to my limits of the activities I enjoy. I started with stitches in my forehead at 5 from roller skating and have been through cracked bones in my left arm, right leg and ribs, the list goes on. This by far is the worst injury combination I have ever had and has certainly gotten my attention.

BTW I skied on a blown up ACL (3/15) for 5 weeks through the end of the season and I started back alpine skiing after my right ACL repair the next season and racing the next, that was in 1998.

I have been skiing 135 days a season or better for almost 40 years so this would be a real good test,,, we'll see. After doing some more reading I would hope to be skiing this November.

I wish for the best for you all.

PS Thank god for helmets.
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replied September 12th, 2012
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sierraskier,

Sorry about your accident.

As to the acetabular fracture, the biggest determining factor in how well it will do is where the fracture line is located. Fractures in the weight bearing dome usually do not do as well as those along the rim. The next is the displacement of the fracture fragments. Diastasis (being apart a little) is tolerated better than a stepoff.

A note on fixing fracutres. Internal fixation of fractures actually does not speed up the healing. In fact, it can actually increase the time to union. But, it sounds like your clavicle fracture was tenting the skin and needed to be reduced better. And, fixing the only bony attachment of the upper extremity to the axial skeleton will help with the use of that extremity. But, you have to be extremely careful to not put too much of a bending moment on the plate holding the clavicle fracture in place. Moving the arm outward in any direction (with the elbow locked in extension, ie the arm straight) places a lot of stress through the clavicle.


Once your wounds have all completely healed, you may want to look into getting into a pool for therapy. Water exercises are very good for lower extremity injured patients, especially those with associated upper extremity problems. The buoyancy of the water (in chest deep water) makes the exercises nonweight bearing and you do not have to use crutches/walker. You can work on both the upper and lower extremity injuries. In neck deep water, you can work on shoulder range of motion without putting any stress on the clavicle. You might want to see if it is okay with your surgeon to start in the pool as soon as you can.


Good luck. You have a long road ahead of you.
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replied September 12th, 2012
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Gaelic, thank you for your reply. The information you provided should be helpful input for me to work with.

The acetabular fracture is near the dome and the displacement is diastasis I do believe, there are no fragments in the fracture, just a clean sightly ziggy diagonal line from the top inside towards the bottom outside. Stability has been fine as of my last visit and x-ray. I have had little discomfort if any for a week with the only noticeable feeling being if I turn my thigh to the inside and I feel the fracture,,,, so I just don't do that.

Regarding the clavicle, when I spoke with the PA and we talked about the repair, plate and screws (Cool in relationship to strength etc. I was advised that I could use it 'very lightly' on my wheel chair wheel, but that the plate (stainless steel) was more to stabilize the fracture until the bone was healed. The clavicle fracture is a 3 piece break with a 1-2" triangular piece in the center hence the need to reduce it once the shoulder side of the break and triangle had dove under the chest side of the bone.

I have good flexibility and have extended the arm in many directions without apparent damage to the repair but will do a mirror self check to see if there is any apparent change. I have done no appreciable lifting and been carefully using my arm with the wheel chair on a very limited basis mostly resting my arm against the armrest of the chair to help alleviate pressure to the clavicle hopefully. BTW the PA and I spoke about my flexibility and motion of my arm and I demonstrated the action I had been doing and he had no issues with this, just caution. I have felt no appreciable discomfort from any of these motions and I do use my sling and sleep with it.

The water therapy does sound good and I will inquire about starting this if appropriate.

I know I have a long road to travel and my ortho. told me I wouldn't be myself for 6 months. I wish for the best possible results, am playing by the DR. rules, went into this in a very fit condition and think my recovery will be substantial, fairly rapid and complete. I just need to maintain my exercised given and attack PT with a vengeance.

Thanks again Gaelic for your reply and I look forward to your future input and all other comments in regard to my condition.
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replied September 12th, 2012
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sierraskier,

I love PAs, they are great physician extenders. But, remember, they are not orthopedic surgeons. Just be really careful with lifting the upper extremity in an extended position. Motions with the elbow bent and the arm close to the body shouldn’t be a problem. I have seen too many clavicle plates pulled out of the bone. Then you would really be in a pickle.

A six month recovery is something to shoot for. You do have your fitness on your side. But, don’t be too surprised if it takes a little longer. Getting back to “regular activities” should not be too much of a problem by that time, but athletic competition is a little different. We used to tell the athletes (around college age) that for every day they were out of practice, it took two days to get back to playing shape. You decondition a lot faster than you condition.


You have been through rehab before, but this time it will probably kick your butt a little. Having both upper and lower extremity injuries makes things a little more difficult.


Again, do look into getting into a pool. You would probably do really well in there. In some pools you can even get into a vest and weights and actually do some running in the deep end of the pool. This is a way that elite athletes stay in shape when they have a lower extremity injury.


You already have a great attitude. Just keep it up. I know you will work hard and probably push through the discomfort, so I’m not going to say work hard. Hang in there. Good luck.
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replied September 12th, 2012
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I will remember your advice on my PA, most certainly. I don't use my arm much but have stretched and straightened it, I will be more mindful of my motions with my arm. After all I don't wish to be as pickle but solid.

After 38 years of skiing 2-4 hours a day for a long term average of 135+ days a season I kind think of free skiing as much like walking aggressively. My muscle tone has been tuned and autopilot for so long that I need not even think about cruising on the groomed snow and catch myself with my mind wandering with other thoughts often while skiing. Now racing and training which I consider a 'regular activity' as we do it 4 days a week is a much more aggressive form of skiing where I have to work hard rather than just cruise as in free skiing groomers.

So as you can see being on skis is a regular part of my fitness and light cardio conditioning as anything else I do lower body. This is something I will have to carefully go over with my physician.

My biggest concern however lies with my snow removal business which involves a bobcat with a snow blower and about 60 driveways. I am a solo operation and sitting in and operating the equipment requires little physical effort besides loading and unloading from the machine. On occasion I need to exit to adjust tire chains or clear the chute but that doesn't require much effort either. Accessing the cab requires stepping onto the bottom cross member of the loader arms and a step right in front of the cab door. There are however a myriad of grips and locations I can use with my 'good side' jungle gym like so I feel confident that should not be an issue. Sitting for the 6 hours that my route most often takes could be an issue but nothing I have done so far has indicated any worries with that.

Most often I am not plowing before Halloween and early November is not usually very heavy as far as intensity and duration of storms, but it can be. Mother nature just never really lets us in on her plans until they are near.

I know I will need to address this issue with my Dr. and PT folks, my PT folks have known me for decades so they are aware of my regular capabilities and will be able to gauge my readiness to deliver when the time comes. I obviously have several motivations to hurry but know I will have to wait as well. I am generally good at reading my body and what most consider hard work are often easy in my mind as I have been so tuned to these efforts. "You have to know when to hold them and when to fold them" kinda comes to mind here.

Thanks again for your encouraging words and advice. I respect what you have offered as it sounds reasonable, logical and expressed with solid knowledge. I will take advantage of your offerings and mold it into my recovery efforts along with my other local input and my personal physical input.

Oh, I have another question regarding the use of NSAIDs and bone growth, prostaglandin synthesis and my timing (4weeks tomorrow). For the first week I was entirely on morphine drip then oral opiates and that would be the immediate stage (1) of 4 stages. In the early stage (2)I transitioned at home to 1 Oxycodone and 1 Advil 3-5 times a day and weaned at the 3 1/2 week to Tyenol only after reading about possible conflicts with bone growth and NSAID use. I would imagine I am now starting the regenerative (3) phase. Did I make a mistake by using NSAID during stage 2 and if so how much time may I have lost in bone regeneration?

Thanks, I'm trying to do as much homework on this as I can.
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replied September 12th, 2012
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sierraskier,

As to the NSAID use in fresh fractures, there are some studies out there that show that they can decrease the fracture healing when they are used in the inflammatory stage and early repairative phase.

Inflammation is the first stage of healing and is necessary. But, it usually only lasts about a week or so. Then the fracture moves into the repairative phase. Then, many months later, goes into the remodeling phase.

Though the studies have shown decreased healing in fractures, with the use of NSAIDs, this has mainly been done in animal models.

If you are a purest, or do not want to chance it, then NSAID use is not recommended. How much it actually affects healing in humans in clinical practice is still not completely known.

I have enclosed some statements from a couple of articles on the subject. There are a lot more studies out there that you can look up on the subject.

Most likely, the use of Advil (ibuprofen) will not affect your fracture healing significantly.


Good luck.





Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2002 Nov;20(6):1164-1169.
COX-2 Selective NSAID Decreases Bone Ingrowth In Vivo
Goodman, et al.

“Whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)—induced suppression of bone ingrowth is due to cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibition, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition, or through a yet unidentified pathway is unknown. Rofecoxib decreased the area of osteoblasts per section area (p = 0.014) compared to controls, although the value for Naproxen sodium did not reach statistical significance. The results of the present study suggest that bone formation is suppressed by oral administration of an NSAID which contains a COX-2 inhibitor. COX-2 inhibitors currently taken for arthritis and other conditions may potentially delay fracture healing and bone ingrowth.” This study was done in rabbits.



Drugs Today (Barc). 2008 Sep;44(9):693-709.
Celecoxib, NSAIDs, and the Skeleton.
O'Connor JP, Lysz T.

“It is clear, however, that cyclooxygenase activity is involved in the healing of many skeletal tissues, either directly or indirectly through modulation of the inflammatory response. Consequently, pharmacological manipulation of cyclooxygenase using NSAIDs or celecoxib can profoundly affect skeletal health.”
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replied September 13th, 2012
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Those are some of the reading I had done that initiated my NSAID question. Thanks for your opinion in this regard, I did not think there were big issues, but am looking at all of the input I can so I can move in the best direction possible for a rapid, yet full and complete recovery.

After viewing my x-rays again yesterday I noted that the fracture traveling through the acetabulum exits towards the back part of the socket where it is curving down, so it is not in the heaviest support area if the hip ball, ie, it exits the cup area where the very far top right part of the S stops. Still near the primary weight bearing area but offset a bit.

I guess my best direction at this time is to attempt to keep the best muscle tone possible with out aggravating my injuries to facilitate my rehabilitation. I am going medication free today and so far have little to no discomfort.
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replied September 14th, 2012
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So far I have been doing fine without any pain medications since Monday 9/9 AM. Been doing the 'left side shuffle' up and down the stairs successfully so I can sleep in a real bed, aaahhh.

I have been picking up on my exercises. The PT in the hospital gave me a sheet of isometric and motion moves to work on for my lower body and I am doing as many of these as is appropriate. I have also been using a 5# dumb bell on my left arm and a 2.5# shot loaded wrist /ankle sleeve on my right to work my arms out a bit and with caution on my right clavicle.

Nothing real extensive but enough to help keep a little tone and help stop atrophy as much as possible. I do have a call in to my DR. regarding water therapy and am waiting for a response.

Over all I think my recovery is coming along well, I have had no faults or falls causing pain to the injured areas. All of my abrasions have mostly healed except for the right knee which was the largest and had a very deep spot, it is now down to a 1"x 1" manageable area.

My overall outlook is good and I am bored but staying reading busy. My endurance has stabilized and is improving (sitting, running errands with my wife, stairs with the 'left side shuffle', and exercises. I think getting off of the prescription meds. has helped with all of this.

I will post updates and mile stones as they occur.
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replied September 14th, 2012
Wow, you were really put through the ringer on this one. I know it is really tough and heartbreaking to be torn from your passionate active lifestyle.

It sounds like you are going to be seeing a physical therapist soon and that is absolutely what you should do. Explain you activity goals and they will guide you in the right direction. Just remember to take it slow. You may not be on the slopes at the beginning of the year but you could at the second half of the season.

Best of luck.
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replied September 14th, 2012
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Thank You, Cindi

I'm still non bearing both arm and leg so PT is still a couple of weeks out. I live in one of the largest ski areas in the country and our PT resources here are as about as good as it gets. The doc said I wasn't yet ready when I went in on 8/31. But I have a request in for hydro therapy if they may think it would help.

My thoughts were in regards to any nutritional recommendations you might have to help promote bone growth if that fit at all into your expertise.
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replied September 15th, 2012
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sierraskier,

In terms of nutritional support for fracture healing, the recommendations are to eat some extra protein (for the building blocks for tissue repair), calcium (the amount recommended for lactating women), vitamin D, and magnesium.

The best source of vitamin D is sunshine. Food is a poor natural source for vitamin D, though a lot of food is now fortified with it (such as milk and bread). Again, 10 to 30 minutes of sunshine on the face and arms is enough to get the recommended daily amount of vitamin D (depending upon skin color). But, you can also take supplements. However, getting out of the house into the sun is also good for the spirits.

So, a one a day vitamin would probably be good for you (or a prenatal vitamin). And, a good steak with a milkshake would also be a good thing every so often.


Hope you are doing well. Good luck.
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replied September 15th, 2012
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I do eat a well rounded diet so the steak (or any beef)is no problem, and the calcium, vitamin D and magnesium are covered. I do get some sunlight daily, but my dermatologist wishes for me to be sunscreen covered as I have had 2 melanomas in the last 10 years. I must be cautious with my sun exposure to keep from getting my wrists slapped.

Getting out onto the deck is something I do almost daily right now and or 'field trips for errands and yes it is good for the soul. My regular lively hood and recreation involve plenty of outdoor activity so I am no stranger to sunshine.

I guess what I do on a regular basis is going to give me about as good a result as I can expect diet wise.

Thanks Gaelic.
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replied September 15th, 2012
Gaelic pretty much nailed it. The only other thing I would recommend is drinking plenty of water, getting an adequate amount of calories, and plenty of sleep.
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replied September 15th, 2012
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Hi Cindy.

Yes he did. I think I already do everything suggested by Gaelic. My doctors just tell me to keep on doing whatever it is I am doing when I go in for physicals, so I think I am good to go that way.

Water is not an issue, as I drink 75-100 oz. a day. Calories, well my weight stays relatively constant at 152- 155#s for about 45 years now, so I think I am good there, my calorie count may be down just a bit but with no real activity I don't wish to gain weight. Sleep, now that might be a bit of an issue, but since I am off the medications I have had a little difficulty sleeping through the night but I have been napping for an hour or more a lot of days. Sleep is becoming easier to get though as the healing goes on.

I have been exercising more regularly with the exercises given from the hospital and added some light weight to my arms, all within the parameters the DR. has given me.

I am getting better every day and longing for the time I can get on a crutch and begin weight bearing. I am still about 2 weeks out for crutches.

Thanks cindi for your response.
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replied September 17th, 2012
sierraskier,
Have you asked your doctors when your bones will be as strong as before the accident, thinking of a possible fall running the gates or free skiing catching an edge?
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replied September 17th, 2012
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The bones should reach about 80% of final strength through the healing period of 8-10 weeks if my understanding is correct. The final 20% with the acetabulum would occur with weight bearing and that is primarily the only way I know of unless just plain old time would accomplish that.

As far as my clavicle, once the bone has healed at about 8 weeks and the plate I have few worries with the strength issue unless, I have the plate removed in which case the 8 screw holes would need around 6-8 weeks to fill in with new bone again before the gone would be approaching full strength.

With protective clothing, warm up pants I think I would be fine with 99% of falls as snow is generally much more forgiving than the street I fell on. I am an expert/advanced skier but do fall on occasion as I ski aggressively and challenge terrain, visibility and all conditions.

I will however not be training or racing this season as I desire as full a recovery as possible and do not wish to be exerting the forces necessary to preform in the gates on very firm snow. In free skiing I can modify my line as is comfortable to address these forces, whereas in racing that is not an option unless I want to ski out of the course.

Thanks Joelllips1 for your concern and question. My main concern with getting back on the hill this season is more with the atrophy I am experiencing than the healing of the bone. Being an accomplished skier with the kind of mileage in my background I can ski on one leg so theoretically unweighted on my injured leg. However due to the nature of my injury I will tempt fate with this one ski skiing and probable falls.

I will adhere to my doctors release to 'rehab' on the hill and I do believe getting on the hill will help provide towards rehab. of my atrophy.
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replied September 17th, 2012
Dear Sierra,
Not sure what your leg injury is besides road rash.
At least you have a season locker and don't have to lug your gear up the mountain!
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replied September 17th, 2012
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When I refer to my leg it is my acetabulum, I did have and it's still healing a month later a very large and in a place deep softball size road rash on my right knee. I am not aware of any damage to my knee so far but I do get some interesting feelings and an occasional bone/tendon pop/click when flexing and stretching it. I have yet to weight it so that is still a mystery, but nothing feels bad in there.

Yes the season locker is wonderful, all I carry is my boots. I just hope I can comfortably squeeze into my race fit.
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replied September 17th, 2012
And if you don't wear a skinny suit and go .001 second slower, I'm sure your race instructor will understand.
I forgot the acetabulum is the socket for the femur, was thinking of the glenoid fossa socket of the shoulder as your problem.
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replied September 26th, 2012
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Just an update here. So far my healing progress seems to be going fine. I have my 6 week accident/post-op follow up visit coming up this Friday.

I have mixed feelings as I really wish to get released to use crutches on my right side and sincerely hope my clavicle has healed to the point where the Dr. will give the OK to use crutches at least lightly around the house.

Both injuries have felt good overall with little to no discomfort and I have had no major faults while getting around. One flexibility stretch on my clavicle when exasperated and swinging my arm overhead last Friday. I felt a muscle a little tender later, but everything else with my clavicle feels solid.

My acetabulum has felt solid with no issues for 2-3 weeks and I am confident the healing there is good. My flexibility with my hip is excellent and causes no discomfort. I do have some clicks or pops when doing flexibility stretches with my leg below the knee and hip but again no pain.

This recovery is trying both my wife's and my patience and is a long slow process, we are both hopeful the Dr. will give me the OK for crutches on Friday.


I have used no pain or OTC meds for 3 weeks now and will update again after my Dr. visit in a couple of days.
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replied September 26th, 2012
How is your wife's recovery going?
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replied September 26th, 2012
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She is batting 1000% on her bilateral knee replacement. She is hiking up the rock trail (healthy uphill grade) with the dog or taking to Hart Lake (even steeper), riding her horse and no longer has arthritic pain. The pain tension lines in her face are gone and she is as happy as can be about her new found and pain free mobility. Her endurance is continuing to improve and her demeanor so much more likeable.
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replied September 26th, 2012
It sounds like you might recommend doing both knees at the same time........
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replied September 28th, 2012
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6 Week Update

I just returned from my 6 week Doctor visit and x-rays. Gaelic, you will be proud to know I didn't end up in the pickle jar as my plate and screws remain intact.

My clavicle is healing well with no issues and had hard calcification forming and filling in well, well enough that I am able to loose the sling and start on crutches. What a relief to be mobile outside of the wheel chair. Having weight bearing on my right arm is a blessing and major healing point in my recovery (thank You doctor).

I will be starting my Physical Therapy on Monday with an evaluation of my hip and will start with my rehab there as it is the next move to help reduce atrophy and start reconditioning my leg. The PT schedule was booked, but I got a call from them and filled the first cancellation that came up. She asked which injury I wanted to start with and I felt my hip would be the most productive so when I am allowed weight bearing I will some asset of strength to take advantage of using this leg sooner and stronger. I am awaiting more cancellations to fill my 2 visits a week each for my injuries. I can continue with the exercises on my right arm and crutching around will help arrest more atrophy. Dr. said I could allow 10% weight on my right leg (toe/ball of foot) which basically means I can rest the weight of my leg on my foot.

Once I have my evaluations for my separate injuries I hope for them to offer an exercise routine for my clavicle on my BowFlex at home in supplementation of my PT. Pt on my clavicle was defined in the prescription as ROM and I think my range of motion is already good but I haven't really pushed it yet.

I'm excited for the progress and will update as I learn more from PT. It is a blessing to regain some mobility but I have not been released to drive until I am allowed to be weight bearing on my right hip which is probably 4 weeks out.
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replied September 28th, 2012
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sierraskier,

That is great news!!

Now, you just have to listen to your body and do not do anything, well, stupid.

You are so well motived that PT for you will maily be outlining a treatment program that you can do at home and keeping track of your progress. You are not the type of patient that will have to be coxed and cajoled into trying a little activity. If anything, the therapist may have to hold to back a little.

Again, that is great news for you. Listen to your body and you should be on the slopes in no time. If you can find a heated pool, you would probably do really well in one.

Good luck.
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replied September 29th, 2012
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The news is great and I am so pleased that I had accepted my fate early on right after my accident, had the patience and help to stay very idle during the early healing process. This let my bones nit and start the healing for solid growth and good unions.

You know I am committed to to making my recovery solid and timely with no 'pickles'. I am well tuned to my body and will absolutely listen to what my body has to say. Working hard and with enthusiasm I will push hard but with discretion and care.

When I had my ACL replaced in 1998 the PT folks said I was one of their more motivated patients,,, I had to be because of the deal I made with my doctor. I had the desire and motivation for a complete recovery. Just like with my regular exercise program, I will alternate different muscle groups and routines allowing for the rebuilding of tissue in between workout days.

For me the therapists give me direction, limitations and the formats of allowable exercises. It is my job to follow their advice within my comfort limits but with an enthusiastic drive to return safely to my former fitness level. I have a strong self desire and commitment to be fit so I can participate in my desired athletic activities competitively.

I have taken your advice with prudence and will continue to let my body direct my progress within the limitations of my PT trainers. Our local facility has a heated pool and I am expecting to have hydro therapy as part of my early treatment.

Being an adult who got older but never grew up/old I have way too many years of life and recreation to not participate with fitness and enthusiasm. After all that is what keeps us young.
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replied September 29th, 2012
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sierraskiier,

You will do great with your therapy, no doubt. You are a therapist's "wet dream" (lol). There is nothing more that I really have to offer you; but if you come up with any questions in the future, I will be very happy to try to answer any you have.

Have fun on the slopes this season.
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replied October 6th, 2012
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Yes, I am a therapist's 'wet dream' as I finally got a release for hydro-therapy on my 2nd PT visit.

After my Doctors visit and getting my release from not using my right arm I took the elevator upstairs to the PT office, gave them my prescription and discovered they had no openings for the next week. The receptionist told me she would put me on the cancellation call list (with a high priority). Later that afternoon I got a call from the PT receptionist and she offered me an opportunity to fill a Monday 10/1 morning cancellation for my first visit which I gladly accepted. My clavicle was listed by prescription as ROM (range of motion) and my acetabulum as NWB (non weight bearing).

Since my hip was not really given much to do with only 10% weight bearing my Therapist opted for evaluating my shoulder's range of motion and all but one position rated at 95% or better while that single stretch was rated 90%. I was assigned a series of stretching exercises to get my ROM where she wanted it.

Since her evaluation was so brief with my shoulder she finished up my visit with an evaluation of my hip for ROM as well and saw I had nearly complete flexibility there as well. We spoke about hydro therapy for my hip/leg and she said she would work the DR., as usually you need a 25% weight bearing release while I was allowed only 10% after my DR. visit.

I waited for another cancellation call but none came so I checked in with the office on Friday morning 10/5 and was offered a 9:30 cancellation to fill and was told to bring in swimming trunks,,, cool. I got 15 minutes on the tread mill in the heated pool and it felt wonderful to use my leg. I had been worried about possible issues with my knee but at least in the water there were no issues and that gave me piece of mind. I am also released to spin on a bike trainer with zero resistance.

During my 2nd PT session I was given a half dozen leg exercises to do as well as direction for exercises on my BowFlex for starting light weight resistance, exercises I can do and those to avoid for now for my upper body.

My PT indicated that she feels I will probably not need many more visits if I stay motivated and proceed with my efforts at home. I will know more after a couple more visits and when I get my full weight bearing release.

Graduating to crutches from the wheel chair was a huge step for me and offers so much more freedom of mobility it is incredible. I continue to spend more time each day moving around and doing little field trips with my wife to increase my endurance. I need to use care, as my hip feels so good it is sometimes tempting to cheat a little on 10% bearing, but with difficulty and lots of focus I have not been cheating and had only a couple of minor 'faults' so far.

To this point I have played by the rules and had excellent results. It has been a long drawn out process and at times my patience runs thin, but getting the excellent results so far has made it well worth while. I can only hope for the best and continue to work towards a full recovery. Once I am released to full weight bearing and a driving release on 10/26 hopefully I will know much more about soon I will be back to a 'normal' life and how soon I may be skiing.
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replied October 6th, 2012
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For many patients, they would think that you recovered in a miraculous amount of time, because it is not uncommon to see patients with your injuries still having problems months or even more than a year out. You are less than two months out from your injury.

Keep up the good work. Best wishes.
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replied October 6th, 2012
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Hi Gaelic:

I still have a long way to go in recovery with a lot more effort to be expended. Not really a miracle but a real good start. Many of the folks posting about acetabulum injuries have had much more severe fractures than mine. To this point I have been very successful and attribute that to a number of things. Oh, by the way my fracture does run through the weight bearing area of the hip socket, I was incorrect with my previous statement.

I was very fit when I was injured and have always lived an active lifestyle.

I had my clavicle repaired with a plate to get out of the wheel chair quicker. (6 weeks)

I remained immobile as much as possible to let the bones heal as solidly as possible through the soft tissue stages.

I had a great diet while healing and drank lots of water. I also quit prescription drugs after 3 weeks and quit OTC pain relief shortly after.

I played by the doctor's rules and did not have any major faults.

Above all I approached the healing process with an aggressively positive attitude.

And I had great support and effort from my wife to help nurse me along.

From here on out I have set an aggressive rehab schedule using the PT directives and exercises, my BowFlex with allowed exercises and starting with light resistance and my mountain bike on a no resistance trainer set-up. I will follow through with this schedule with physical therapist direction, prudence, caution and the discretion necessary to heal well without causing any setbacks.

I still have plenty of work to be ready to 'hit the ground running' when I am allowed to finally go full weight bearing 3 weeks (hopefully). I plan to fall back to my regular BowFlex routine with the allowable exercises and start with very light resistance, gradually increasing resistance as appropriate. Spinning on my mountain bike with zero resistance for 15-30 minutes a day, and using the stretching exercises for my shoulder and the half dozen leg exercises indicated by my physical therapist.

My 15 minute secession on the hydro treadmill yesterday did not cause any soreness nor was I tired as my PT indicated many folks would be. The only recent soreness or stiffness I have experienced has been my lower back after starting on crutches a week ago. I did 15 minutes on my mountain bike today after I got it set up on a trainer with no load.

I will continue to aggressively rehab within the guidelines set for me so I can be ready to run my snow removal business when mother nature demands my time. I will also continue to update my progress, hopefully with no disappointments.
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replied October 7th, 2012
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Look forward to your updates.

Keep up with the positive attitude, it will keep you going more than anything else.

Above all else, listen to your body, it will tell you if you are doing anything stupid. Mother nature gave us pain for a reason.

Sounds like a great plan. When working on the stationary bike right now, remember to pedal only with your good leg, letting your injured one go "along for the ride".

Again, look forward to your updates.
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replied October 7th, 2012
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Thanks Gaelic

I will keep up the positive attitude, it helps to keep things rolling so I can get back to 'normal' as soon as possible. I also feel a positive attitude promotes a better balance within the bodies systems, whereas being down can be detrimental to those systems.

I am listening to my body and feeling the good soreness from working out my muscles through stretching and the 15 minute bike spinning from yesterday. You mention to let my recovery leg free ride, why is that?

I was released to 10% weight bearing and also released to do the hydro therapy which my PT said usually requires a 25% weight bearing (but I am only doing so in the water under supervision). My trainer with the mountain bike is no load, with a free wheeling rear wheel, and I was released to do so from the doctor at the same time he released me for the hydro treadmill.

Sierra Skier
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replied October 7th, 2012
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Sierra,

Remember, there is a difference between "no load" and "no active pushing with injured leg". Try not to use any muscles on the injured leg, it should only be along for the ride, to work on range of motion.

As soon as you are released for active rehab of the injured leg, then go for it. You are doing so well, you will most likely continue.

Hydro therapy is always great. It is wonderful that your facility actually has a tread mill within their pool. That is not very common. When you are released to your own accords, you may have to find another pool. But, if you do, it is still well worth it. There are a lot of things you can do in a pool, while still not totally weight bearing, that you cannot do outside of the pool. It also helps with rehab of the upper extremity, because you can get in neck deep water (or sit down in shallow water) and the buoyancy will help lift up the arm without any stress being applied across the clavicle. I just love water therapy, maybe I should go into selling swimming pools.

Good luck. Don't have to tell you to work hard.
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replied October 7th, 2012
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Gaelic, thanks again for your thoughts and advice. You do give me insight in addition to that I receive from my PT and Doctor and it is applied along with the feedback my body gives me. I am feeling some muscles but it is the good feel of light soreness from light workouts. I am starting slow and will crescendo as my body and guide lines indicate.

While riding the bike the spin is almost effortless, with the only muscle usage being lifting the leg a little as the peddle comes up, and with a 10% allowed weight bearing I feel fine. I feel just the slightest tinge of muscles from the bicycle workout and will listen to what my body tells me tomorrow morning before I hit PT. I think the bike is more very light aerobic and flexibility then muscle effort.

The pool is more like an over sized jacuzzi, probably about 8'x12-14' long and does have jets that offer swimming speed water flow. The treadmill experience was excellent, we will see what my PT has in mind for me tomorrow. I will report and update my exercise program in full so she knows exactly what I have been up to.

I also did a couple of long over due oil changes on our trucks with the wife's help. Yesterday it was picking up my trailered Bobcat loader and brought it home, unloaded it from the trailer and changed buckets to begin moving split firewood to our deck. No, I am not splitting or stacking the wood, just moving it with the loader and dumping it on the deck.

I am doing this while playing by the defined rules and 10% limits on my non weight bearing leg. I am behaving and life here in the mountains goes on. Winter is coming and we need to be prepared when it hits. With luck, caution, good PT and exercise I will get a full release in less than 3 weeks. Time is getting too short to have any major faults setting me back. Every effort and move I make is well thought out and calculated with both caution and necessity.
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replied October 7th, 2012
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Sounds great. Look forward to your future updates.
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replied October 12th, 2012
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I have had 2 Physical Therapy sessions this week with Hydro Therapy being the major focus for my acetabulum and range of Motion stretches for my clavicle. So far both Physical Therapists are pleased with everything I am doing with the standard cautions of being careful with my aggressive home rehab.

They have given me a couple of pointers with shoulder position so my Bowflex exercises give the best benefit. I have been alternating my exercise days to let my muscles recover from the Bowflex upper body exercises, and leg lift and isometric exercises for my leg. I have been doing 30 minute no load spin work in the bike trainer every other day as well.

Muscle soreness from exercises has been noticed in various places with the Quads having been the most noticeable, all a good exercise related soreness.

Waking in the middle of the night last night I started to take off to the bathroom and was 2 steps into the trip when I realized I should be using my crutches so I back stepped one step and retrieved them for the trip,,,, oops a fault. I felt no apparent discomfort or issues so far this morning from my fault.

With the lack of pain or discomfort it is becoming increasingly difficult to keep from using my right leg more than my allowed recommended limits, but I am doing the best I can to remain focused on my 10% weight bearing limit.

So far so good and I am anxiously waiting for my 10 week Dr. visit in 2 weeks to be allowed to bear weight on my right leg. Hopefully my transition from crutches to walking will be short and comfortable.
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replied October 12th, 2012
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Sierra,

If you are not having any pain in the hip (and the x-rays look okay), you will most likely be advanced to a cane pretty quickly with weight bearing as tolerated.

The surgeon is just being careful, with the fracture line going through the weight bearing dome.

Good luck.
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replied October 12th, 2012
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Gaelic,

No pain but a very light acheiness this morning from my activities yesterday and possibly the couple of steps during the night and/or sleeping position. I have had this feeling a couple of times but a few stretches and it is gone. My clavicle x-rays showed good hard callous had formed but I don't think much will be visible on such a small fracture line on my pelvis.

I realize the Dr. is being cautious and I respect, accept and agree with that as I wish for a 'best case scenario' for a complete healing with no future complications. I do anticipate a few aches or pains beyond just muscle soreness when I am allowed weight bearing but due to my hydro therapy and bicycle training don't expect any major issues.

Do you feel a cane or walking stick will be in order as a transition or will I be able to go to unassisted walking because I am using my muscles and have arrested atrophy? Perhaps I should shop online for something in case I do need it as we have no shops in town that would offer such products,,, ski poles, no problem but not really suitable for a load.

I am excited and blessed to this point with a solid recovery. This process just seems to take forever, but it hopefully is coming to a close for my crutches and restrictions. I will continue to be patient and have perseverance with the program.
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replied October 12th, 2012
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It's nice to transition using a cane. Which the cane you can put as much or as little weight as desired. With a cane in the opposite hand, you can take up to 50% off the injured hip. You want to use a cane in the opposite hand to maintain proper gait biomechanics (not really because your upper extremity injury is on the same side, if I remember correctly).

So, sometimes we go straight from crutch walking to nothing, but usually the patient is weight bearing as tolerated with the crutches first. In other words, the patients are basically walking on their own, and just sort of moving the crutches along with them, but not really using them.

A cane are walking stick is nice to have at first, especially when you go out, mainly to keep other people away from you. We tell a lot of our patient to use them, just for that reason. Most people out in the community will give way to a person using a cane or crutches and will not bump into them.

But, it is up to your surgeon and you.

Good luck.
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replied October 17th, 2012
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Hi Gaelic,

Yesterday I had my last PT until just before my 10 week doctor visit. My PT said a cane or walking stick could be a good transitional tool, especially if I can't tolerate full weight bearing or tire easily once released by the doctor.

I like your thoughts regarding folks keeping their distance when someone has a cane or walking stick and with proper training it can also be quite a defensive tool as well. My neighbor is bringing a walking stick over which will be a little too long but give me an idea of usage and grip style to check out. I will be placing an order later today or tomorrow.

We are going on a field trip. My wife will be doing a 3 day horse clinic and I will be just getting out and about at the ranch or watching some for several days then back to our Reno 2nd home and my dermatology doctor visit,,, yes I have had a couple of melanomas in the past. We will do some running around and necessary shopping before we return home to our small town.

I have one more PT visit just before my ten week doctor visit and my PT wants that visit so she can write a report and walk it down stairs to my physician so he is up to date on my condition. That will occur on 10/26 and that will probably be my next update.

Thanks again for your input and encouragement. So far my recovery has been excellent and uneventful. I can only continue to hope for the best going forward.
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replied October 17th, 2012
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Sierra,

Glad you are doing so well. It will be nice to get out of the house, out in the open air. A walking stick will be great in that setting.

Have a good time.
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replied October 25th, 2012
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Just a quick update. I had a very busy week with 6 hour drives and long days with my wife to share time with her horse clinic. We left Thursday last week and drove over the Sierras for her clinic, we stayed with friends in a small ranch/walnut orchard. I attended the lunches and dinners for 3 days of her clinic and we returned the six hour drive through a sierra snow storm only to get home where I had to plow my driveway snow removal route which was another 5-6 hours. A very long day for me, only to arise about 3 AM and drive to Reno (3 1/2 hours) on some icy roads for the first half hour for my dermatology check up.

All is well, I have no special discomfort except for some light muscle soreness. The field trips were great for helping to increase my endurance even though I didn't exercise my regular program much. I did however work on my bicycle trainer for a couple of half hour sessions and had a lot of crutching around.

Tomorrow I have an early PT session after which my PT will write a report and give it to my doctor whom I will see at 10 AM and hopefully get a release to bear weight as tolerated. I will more than likely be released to drive officially and receive a prescription for PT on my right leg.

I am excited and more than ready to begin living without crutches if the doctor gives me the go. I did pick up a walking stick to use if fatigue sets in. I will update again tomorrow with my new marching orders.
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replied October 25th, 2012
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sierra,

You are just amazing. You are like the Energizer Bunny, you just keep going and going and...

Keep us posted.

Oh, there is a new patient who just posted a very sad story of some very severe injuries, including an acetabular fracture. You might see if you could give her some words of encouragement and advice. Her avatar is “IvetteQ”. She posted a message under the long acetabular fracture thread. She would probably be grateful for some information from another acetabular fracture patient. Thanks.
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replied October 25th, 2012
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I read her post and it is sad, I needed time to think it over a bit before offering a response. I'll get back over there.

Energizer Bunny, I guess so. I have been chomping at the bit for weeks now. With the bone discomfort a non issue it has been difficult to 'play by the doctor's rules', but I am doing the best I can. It was great to get out of the home and spend some time in another atmosphere.

I have been feeling better and better and need to progress my recovery and endurance while doing the best I can to abide by the rules. Plowing was a non option. After playing jungle gym to climb into the little Bobcat it is just sitting and pushing some levers and moving some peddles, but traveling and working did make for a long exhausting day.

I'll be back tomorrow with the new rules and PT directives after I complete my appointments. I am anxious and hoping the DR. is pleased with my recovery and rehab to let me bear much more weight and drive. I believe I am ready.
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replied October 27th, 2012
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Well, my PT visit went well. I had hydro therapy on the treadmill and an evaluation of my ROL and strength of both my injuries. Her report must have been a good one because my 10 week checkup with the Dr. gave me what I wished for. I was released to bear weight as tolerated, drive and do what ever I feel OK doing with my best discretion.

The only thing the DR. balked at was skiing until I am close to 80% strength or about 3 months from my injury date, again with my best discretion. I am still of the position my daily couple of hours skiing will help contribute to my recovery overall when the time comes and it is allowed. Every season I do a slow start skiing to get my legs into shape so when our mountain gets good coverage I am ready to take advantage of the terrain.

My PT indicated we will begin working on my leg strength as she is pleased with my clavicle ROM and strength, just a little tuning to do up top. She asked me to bring my Bowflex exercise manual in to determine which exercises I can begin with for at home work on my leg and our focus will be on my lower body/weak leg.

I started out of the Doctors office using my crutches (habit) until my wife said I don't need them any more and at that point I carried them out, it felt strange and kind of light on my leg, but stable and good. I drove, did a full upper body exercise on the Bowflex with my minimal weight (I am allowed to start increasing my resistance on this as indicated by tolerance), went for a short walk with my wife and dog on a real dirt trail through the sage brush and shared my success with a visit to see a good friend (and more stairs).

I am pleased with my recovery results to date, but still have a long way to go. I climbed stairs several times but at the stairs just before bed time I did feel some weakness and tensions below the knee in the front/medial area, very possibly from just being tired from the days activities without crutches. I did carry a walking stick in case of fatigue but never really needed to use it.

I believe keeping a positive attitude, hard work, good diet, family assistance and playing by the rules as best I could all helped to contribute to my recovery to this point. The other contractor I work with said he could use me for work any time I am ready as they are very busy, I feel I need at least a week to stabilize, strengthen and clear through my PT before I attempt to begin remodeling work.

So far so good. I will continue to rehab, exercise and begin to incorporate my normal daily activities into my regimen as my endurance and strength indicates is prudent. I continue to listen to my body as a guiding light knowing it will help steer me in the right direction and keep me from over doing my rehabilitation.
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replied October 27th, 2012
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Sounds like you are doing great.

The surgeon is just telling you what all team surgeons will tell their athletes; you have to be as close to full strength before returning to the line-up, so that you do not reinjury yourself. If you are weak in one area, you will compensate, possibly causing injury to another area.

So, if you keep doing as well as you have been, you should regain your strength pretty quickly. Then, you won't have any worries when you hit the black diamond slopes.

Good luck.
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replied October 28th, 2012
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Thanks Gaelic,

Saturday turned into a rest day after the celebration of no longer needing to use my crutches. I did some garage work and only did some stretches. I was out and about but not like on Friday. I did feel muscles I forgot I had but just good light exercise soreness.

I did my bicycle for half an hour today and did my full Bowflex upper body routine. I am doing the stretches and heading our for some walking. I will probably walk with my wife and the dog later this afternoon. Yesterday I recovered from my active Friday and it felt good but I need to stay on track.

Hopefully Monday I will do a full exercise day as well. I will see how I feel in the morning and determine how hard I should work out. It sure feels good to be free of the crutches.

Tomorrow I have PT and will get my new assignment for leg work,,,, oh boy.
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replied October 28th, 2012
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sierra,

I can tell that you have been an athlete your whole life.

Athletes talk about how good the workout aches and pains feel. How it is great to hurt after a game or a hard session of physical therapy. (I know just how you feel.)

Yet, I hear all the time, patients complaining that they have some back pain, or shoulder pain, or knee pain, after they have just roofed their house, or done some spring cleaning. Well...yea. That's called life. But, it seems that a lot of our population has "medicalized" everyday aches and pain, as if they have some medical disorder that needs to be treated.

"Why can't the doctors find out what is wrong with me, I have all this pain, yet 15 MRIs, 10 CT scan, and 20 bone scans, labs, electrical studies, etc, etc, etc have all been negative." Maybe there is nothing wrong, except the everyday aches and pains, that are normal, yes normal.

Sorry, I'll get off my soapbox. It is just great to see someone do really well after such a significant injury and who does not mind the occasional ache or pain associated with the therapy needed for recovery.

Glad you are doing well. You don't need encouragement, you will always go above and beyond what is actually needed.

It's interesting that you already have so much snow. I live in a desert, and it is just now getting cool in the evenings. Well, it always gets cool at night in the desert, but I mean really cold. I have to travel a couple of hours north to see any snow. And then, it is only up on the highest mountains (over 12K).

Hang in there. Hope you get back to your regular occupational pursuits real soon.
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replied October 28th, 2012
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Gaelic,

Thanks for the compliment regarding accepting pain/soreness. It is true that if you have no pain there will not be much gain. I remember enjoying sports and competition from my youngest ages and throughout my life. I have participated in sports and competitions of all kinds across the board.

I am not the best biggest or fastest, but I have always given it my utmost efforts and am usually near the leaders. Along with the efforts to stay fit and compete there are always bumps, injuries, occasional pain and soreness and you are correct, THAT IS LIFE.

I know you are no youngster and you have paid some dues like old guy with injuries or repairs to the body form the years of hard use or what some might call abuse.

To me there is nothing like loving the activities of life whether it be fly fishing in my float tube, alpine ski racing, shooting,,, or my bicycle riding along with all of the other activities I engage in.

On the other hand;

We live just east of Yosemite National Park at one of the larger ski areas in the country, with one of the longest ski seasons besides the glaciers in the north west, our season often runs from late October/early November through the 4th of July. Usually a solid 8 months of open lifts. The Pacific storms come loaded with moisture and funnel up Yosemite Valley and crest the 11,000-12,000 peaks to our west and just unload all of that cooled moisture as snow.


If you look at the picture of the ski area and a little to the right there are finger shaped peaks in the ridge line. Yosemite is not far behind them.

I grew up spend weekends and holidays in the deserts of the south west at our homestead cabin and yes the deserts do get cold. I love and respect the deserts.

Off with the wife to walk the dog.
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replied October 29th, 2012
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The picture was deleted by admin. as per policy. My apologies for linking without thinking about policy. Thank you admin for letting the balance of my post stand.
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replied October 30th, 2012
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Be carefull in the snow, don't slip and fall onto that hip.

Have fun pilling up the snow. And keep up the rehab.

Look forward to hearing how you are doing.
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replied November 2nd, 2012
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11 weeks into my recovery and PT is working on my leg strength with half a dozen exercises and 4 Bowflex exercises for my hip/leg. The hip is doing fine, but the leg is weak especially through he knee area. The discomfort below the knee is improving daily.

I continue with my upper body workouts on my Bowflex and will more than likely increase either my weight or repetitions in the next couple of days. I am on the bike trainer 4-5 days a week for 1/2 an hour. I continue with my daily activities but my leg dislikes stairs after a long day, stairs are not bad until I get tired, not bad but I do compensate some.

Overall improvement is steady and good
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replied November 2nd, 2012
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sierra,

Good job. You have noted the one consistent thing in rehab - things are harder when you are tired. This is a time to really be careful. When you are tired, more injuries can happen (you can't protect yourself as well). So, just be careful in your job and in therapy when you are tired.

Keep it up.
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replied November 3rd, 2012
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Gaelic;

Caution is the word of the day. I am very conscious and deliberate with every step and foot placement especially when fatigued. My PT and home exercise is very measured and I am not over doing it but increasing gradually as tolerated, hopefully using my best discretion and common sense while listening to my body for any indications of too much effort or pain.

After PT on Friday which offered spin on the trainer and stretching I did my offered leg exercises and then hit the Bowflex with increases on the weight amounts to 65%-90% of my normal workouts and feel good this morning. My recovery continues.

I posted the information below on another thread and brought it over here as I believe it is a part of my story.


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Re: Acetabular Fracture
skydiver13 wrote:
On the 9th week, I started to get a painful sensation between my second and third toe on my right foot as I stated to apply more pressure on my injured leg.
I went to the doctor on the 10th week and X-rays showed that the fracture healed properly. I was told to start using a cane when I walk, provided I don't feel any pain. He also told me that the numbness or uncomfortable stiffness is my sciatic nerve and it should go away on its own as I recover. He told me it was related to my inactivity.
Right now I'm on week 12. I walk around the house without my cane. My hip joint doesn't hurt, but it makes slight clicks from time to time. That stiffness sometimes goes away as I walk around, sometimes it's gone for days, but then comes back mostly at night when I sit down or lay in bed. The pain between my toes doesn't go away, it might be even getting worse - so I'm concerned about that. I wonder if anyone had any similar experiences with toe pain and tightness/numbness in the back of injured leg? How careful should I be walking around the house if there's no pain associated with my hip joint? I don't really limp when I walk, it just feels weird not being able to grab on to something for my balance? Thank you for your thoughts and inputs on that matter guys.
I wish everyone a speedy recovery, and God bless you all.


Skydiver;

First let me say my accident occurred on August 16th so we are almost running parallel on our time frame. I am much older @ 62 years old now,,, just had my b-day. The Dr. kept me on crutches until the end of week 10.

During my recovery I had foot pain numerous times. I do have bunions and had several bouts of pain from swollen joints in the ball of the foot area which lasted for several days. Early on it was from hopping around on my left foot, with so little usage that pressure from hopping and twisting on the ball of my foot caused the bunion area to go off with enough pain the weight from blankets hurt. Each bout lasted about 3-4 days from the first indication until it felt better.

I am currently getting over a very tender bout of discomfort on both feet. One bout of pain between 6-10 weeks while on crutches moved from the big toe to all but by baby toe in my recovering right foot. I believe this foot pain is common after being non weight bearing for extended periods.

Aches and pains were occasional in the glutes and hamstring areas but not prevalent or discerning, but more of a distraction. I have snap, crackle and pop of tendons in the hip area and below the knee on occasion but they are not painful. I even did a 3 or 4 snap, crackle, pop for the doctor while demonstrating ROM for him when I was @10 weeks for my release from crutches. He chuckled and said not to worry it was normal during recovery as long as there was no pain involved.

Be patient and measured with your recovery. We have a good opportunity to heal well and completely but it will take time. The ER doctor when asked about my bottom line told me 6-8 weeks on my clavicle, 8-10 weeks on my acetabulum and it would be 6 months before I felt like myself again. Hope this helps. Visit my thread for a full detail of my experience and feel free to post or ask questions there regarding my experience or yours.
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replied November 12th, 2012
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It is time for an update. Tomorrow I graduate PT. They feel I am far enough along with good ROM and flexibility, enough strength and the determination to rehab solidly at home that it is time for me to be on my own.

Tomorrow they will give me whatever instructions they feel proper to let me go.

I have been working light duty construction since last Thursday except for my PT Friday. I am only pulling 5-7 hours a day but the 7 hour day left me exhausted but feeling fine. I backed off to 5 hour days and am still worked but not nearly as bad.

I will have a more detailed report tomorrow after my final PT secession.
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replied November 16th, 2012
Experienced User
I graduated PT on Tuesday morning and continued working Tuesday after PT, working about 5 hours a day. Wednesday was a day off because I was caught up so I skied. The conditions were early season sparse but the snow was excellent with the runs that are open groomed and with winter like fresh type of snow. No crowds, I almost had the runs to myself and ski partner.

I took 8 runs (about 1000' vertical per run) on the two intermediate lifts that were open and had no issues. The runs were just cruising at a recreational pace with carving racing turns leaving behind nice railroad tracks. I could have skied longer but decided not to fatigue myself and tempt fate after resolving my anxiety about getting back on the hill comfortably.

The job is winding down for a bit but I worked on Thursday again. It is sure nice to have my world closing back in on 'normal'. I will continue to work out at home/work/ski to get my endurance and strength back up to par. I can see my atrophy will take some time to overcome completely. I am currently at 3 months from my injury date and pleased to be well on my way to a successful recovery, boy does this take a long time and lot of effort.

I can only wish for as much for others who are or have experienced such difficult injuries. I sincerely hope my reporting of this experience will give others hope for a bright light at the end of the tunnel and a desire for the best results possible. I will attempt to continue with occasional updates as I have read others have had setbacks well into their recoveries, hopefully I can continue to report excellent recovery results.

Gaelic, Thank You for your support, guidance and enthusiasm in helping me through my medical trauma it certainly was a more comforting experience with your feedback.
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replied November 16th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
sierraskier,

Glad you are doing so well. Sounds like you are going to do just fine.

Be careful and safe, till you know you are completely back to your usual conditioning level. But, do have fun.

Good luck.
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replied November 19th, 2012
Experienced User
Everything continues to go well, I am at 13 1/2 weeks. I am done with the remodel for a while but worked through Saturday the 17th and plowed yesterday. Today, Monday the 19th I skied for day 2 with my wife. We did about a dozen to 15 runs on mostly groomed winter snow and 2 runs in wind pack (wind pack is mother natures best grooming) conditions and the skiing was incredible. I probably could have done more but called it as I was listening to my body and could feel I was getting tired.

Although work was helping my overall endurance, I was doing stairs and some ladder work it kept me from strength exercises so now that work is done for a while I will refocus on my exercises and the Bowflex workouts.

I will probably be skiing on an almost daily basis and exploring the off piste conditions as is appropriate. My daily skiing usually involves 20-25 runs with 20,000-28,000 vertical feet. the amount of effort involved depends on how much groomed I ski to how difficult the off piste conditions are.

I am excited about being back to almost normal and will continue to work on getting my fitness levels up to my norm. I still have a long ways to go.
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