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Health Blogs | Developmental and Intellectual Ability | parenting | Anxiety | Stress

Anxiety, Genetics/Environment, Items from SENG, and More

August 10th, 2017 by 76Trombones
STRESS AND ANXIETY. A psychologist from Boys Town writes in The Washington Post about stress and anxiety in teens, and what parents can do to help. Basic steps include: looking for signs; letting kids know it's okay to feel upset; and having more family time. Read more. Separately, an article at Philly.com is titled "How family doctors can help kids and teens fight depression and anxiety." It is based on reportage from a panel session at a recent National Medical Association. Panel members urged practitioners to: look beyond the words, because irritability or boredom can be signs of depression; look for excessive cellphone use; and recognize that regular family dinners might not occur in some homes. Panelists noted that some families might not trust mental health professionals as much as the family doctor. Said one panelist, "No kid should leave your office without a safety plan." Read more. Also on the topic of what the family doctor can do to find or treat mental health issues, The Agenda feature at Politico.com notes an Alaskan healthcare system that built mental health into its primary care practice. Read more. (Also at Politico.com "5 must-reads on mental illness."

WE'LL HEAR MORE ON THIS. The University of Chicago issued a press release about research results published this week. The research analyzed genetic and environmental influences on common diseases in almost half a million people in 130,000 families. The research revealed surprising correlations between diseases -- for example that migraines "appeared to be most genetically similar to irritable bowel syndrome." Here's what the press release says, in part: "...the team created a disease classification based on two measures. One focused on shared genetic correlations of diseases, or how often diseases occurred among genetically-related individuals, such as parents and children. The other focused on the familial environment, or how often diseases occurred among those sharing a home but who had no or partially matching genetic backgrounds, such as spouses and siblings." Among the conditions categorized are ADHD, anxiety phobic disorder, depression, mood disorder, and substance abuse. The release contains a chart showing the various relationships between diseases, genetics, and the environment -- but it's not for the faint of heart to try to figure out, although readers here certainly have as good a chance as anyone to make sense of it. Find the press release, and watch for further explanation of this (we hope) in the mainstream media over the next week or so.

THANKS TO THE SENG CONFERENCE, we have three items to offer:
  • Josh Shaine, the organizer of the Beyond IQ conferences, successor to the Hollingsworth conferences, has a Facebook group called Gifted "Underachievers" -- his quotes, not ours. If this topic interests you, perhaps check it out
  • The Fringy Bit is a group of resources from two family therapists from Wisconsin, one of whom we met at the SENG conference. "Kids on the fringe" are like the ones you raise and educate. The couple's goals are to provide support and connection to the Fringy Bit community -- support via podcasts, Facebook, a blog, and more. Find out more
  • The conference was also inspiration for Jen the Blogger to write about her gratitude for some things that happened during the conference, more specifically how one of her sons engaged with the 2e community there. Those active in the 2e community know that the individuals responsible for one's participation in the community are often wary of being associated with it themselves. But not so in this case. Find Jen's blog
TiLT PARENTING has released its newest podcast, this one about the experiences of Debbie's son at summer Space Camp. It's a follow-up to an earlier podcast about the son's preparations for the camp, eg in terms of predicting and planning for "tricky situations" that might arise at camp. Find the podcast.

AND FINALLY, THIS. A 9yo boy applied to become NASA's planetary protection officer, a new position at the agency. One qualification he listed, according to The Washington Post: "My sister thinks I'm an alien." He actually got a good reaction from NASA -- although not the job. Read more.
 
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Tags: Developmental and Intellectual Ability, asbergers, ad/hd, parenting, Anxiety, Stress, ADHD


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