Medical Questions > Mental Health > Dyslexia Forum

8 year old boy possible dyslexia

I have an 8 year old son who has excelled at just about everything he has tried. With the exception of literacy. I have been working with the school to help him in any way possible. A concern was never brought up in preschool or Kindergarten. Granted he wrote backwards I knew from being a pre-k teacher that this wasn't uncommon. 1st grade is where the concerns began. He still continued to write and then read words either jumbled up or backwards. Oddly he would also mirror words for example when given a spelling test he would write every word on the left side of his paper in the correct direction with a letter backwards here or there but then the right side of the paper he would write every word backwards. I then began folding the paper in half so he could only write on the left side. That helped. When meeting with the teacher I was told she didn't know what to do. She had not experienced a child like my son. We had him tested for a learning disability but test came back to show there was no issue there. He has all the fundamentals to be able to read. One interesting observation they made was that he is right handed yet holds his pencil and has the same mannerisms as a left handed person. They continued to help him in smaller groups outside of special ed. Some improvement was made but he is still failing at his grade level but was allowed to move onto 2nd grade. Now in 2nd grade we still experience the same problems. It almost seems worse since words and numbers are getting larger. His frustration is increasing as is mine. I was most alarmed when he was doing number comparison of less, greater and equal to. Every number on the left was read backwards and every number on the right was correct. What really blew my mind was that one of the questions was 29 and 29 and he was so sure that it was 92 and 29. How can that happen when clearly they are the same number! He now asks me to tell him which number is the the tenth so he knows what to say first. This is all very confusing for me. I have no idea how to help him. He is so smart I don't understand why he doesn't get this. He even told me the other day that he was in 5th grade reading because he was reading a book with and "E" on the binding for the volume. I was thinking what on earth would make you think you are in 5th grade reading. He says duh mom, it says letter E. That's the 5th letter in the alphabet! Weird! His school is on this whole wait and see approach. I don't want to wait and see anymore. His teacher and I had decided in October to wait until February to reevaluate. I emailed her this week and told her I was ready to move forward. She insisted that I first have him tested for inattentiveness. Which is nicely wording "ADD." I was not happy about that! Has anyone else experienced this issues with the school? I can't even understand how a reversal of letters and numbers turns into him just not focusing. He strives for perfection and really truly wants to learn and be like all his other friends. He even borrows chapter books from the library at school and fakes reading them just to fit in. That doesn't show me inattentiveness. Not to mention I feel if this was a concern it would have been brought up long before 2nd grade. I think he just feels like a failure because no one is teaching him the way he needs to be taught and he has become discouraged. Any input from anyone who has been down this road would be greatly, greatly appreciated!
Thank you in advance,
Angie
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First Helper AngieHen
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replied December 12th, 2011
How is it that more then 100 people read this story and not a single person has any input to give. I posted this as a means of advice and support. Not for entertainment.
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replied August 9th, 2012
Dyslexia
Hi , I'm sorry this is a late post and may or may not help you . But be assured your post made my hair stand up on my arms! You are describing my son to a T. I don't know how many huge chapter book I have found in his school bag! I am only just beginning the journey( call from principal 2 days ago stating the bleeding obvious/ approached them 2 yrs ago/ he opted to "wait and see). I hope you are soldiering along. Love your don and delight in the positives ( my don is an exceptional sportsman and a terrific kid with lots of friends). Keep a positive demeanor around him ( my son writes poems and stories that I struggle to read but I am thankful he still has confidence to do so). I wish you all the best, you sound like a terrific mum!
Tracy
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replied August 30th, 2012
Thanks Tracy! My son has since been diagnosed with dyslexia and dysgraphia. Now we are on the journey of learning how to teach him using the orton-gillingham method. Best wishes to you as well.
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replied September 3rd, 2012
Hey Angie I hope you read this. I hope your finding good information about dyslexia. I don’t know anything about the orton-gillingham method, so I can‘t comment on it. But I am severely dyslexic myself. I went though school without being diagnosed, and it was rough. I was sent for hearing tests, vision tests, called lazy, and so on. I was lucky enough to find my own way of doing things. On the plus side I can read a book upside down in a mirror just as easily as reading the normal way. As a dyslexic I wouldn’t change the way my brain functions if I could. I feel that overall I’ve benefited from having dyslexia. The thing I usually find that’s not mentioned about dyslexia are the auditory and visual latency issues. If you find information on the internet that mentions it, you’re probably reading good information. Also if you haven’t searched the internet for famous dyslexics I think you should. Dyslexia common traits is also a good search term. : )
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replied September 4th, 2012
Yes thank you. Orton-gillingham is a multi sensory learning. He is now enrolled in a STEM school(science, technology, engineering and mathmatics) mostly hands on learning in a variety of multi sensory teachings. We were fortunate to have one open near by, free of charge and transportation provided! I have looked at famous people and shared that with him. Through his testing we also learned his IQ is 130. Much higher then mine! We teach our child that he has a gift and not a disability.
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replied October 2nd, 2012
I just found a font called OpenDyslexic. The best part is the font is offered for free (Open Source). I wasn't looking for it, but stumbled on it in a unrelated topic.

I thought it could be beneficial to post here. Maybe it can help someone that stumbles upon this thread. Please don't feel compelled to respond. I only posted in this thread so you and the others that posted here might get a topic update email.
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replied November 9th, 2012
I'm so happy for you Angie, as you and your son turn what could have been a bad situation to a good situation. your son might be dislexic but He is a champ. He is going to do great things. Keep encouraging him, and like someone said keep a positive demeanor around him. Le him focus on his strengths and not his weaknesses. Have a blessed time. Smile
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replied January 30th, 2013
Why do teacher refuse to see dyslexia as a viable need?
We are just beginning the path...I am seriously questioning my daughter, here in the middle of First grade...but the teacher is blowing me off...and I am seeing tons of RED FLAGS...what is with dyslexia and refusing to see the needs of a child??? If you are a teacher worth your salt, you would want kids to be successful!!! This is mind-numbing to be forced to look for testing out of the school system, because the school refuses to see a problem...Glad you found help for your boy, I hope to see your success....

I am a dyslexic and I don't want my daughter to struggle with what I did.
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replied January 30th, 2013
Why do teacher refuse to see dyslexia as a viable need?
We are just beginning the path...I am seriously questioning my daughter, here in the middle of First grade...but the teacher is blowing me off...and I am seeing tons of RED FLAGS...what is with dyslexia and refusing to see the needs of a child??? If you are a teacher worth your salt, you would want kids to be successful!!! This is mind-numbing to be forced to look for testing out of the school system, because the school refuses to see a problem...Glad you found help for your boy, I hope to see your success....

I am a dyslexic and I don't want my daughter to struggle with what I did.
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replied February 10th, 2013
There is nothing wrong with being dyslexic. Being Dyslexic does not hinder you, only if you let it. I have gone to school, college and now grad school. I learned English, German and I hope soon to learn Russian. (I majored in Linguistics to help with my dyslexia.) I spend a lot of my time reading and re-writing a lot of my papers but I see it as a way to work on my problem. I never asked to be this way, but I am happy with who I am.

I have concluded-when I write something without thinking it makes zero sense; I need to think and be patient. People will never understand you. They think either A) he can't read B) he's uneducated or C) he's dumb. None are further from the truth.
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replied May 9th, 2013
AngieHen... I found your post because I have found myself in your similar situation. Please remember that probably many of the 100+ people who viewed your page were looking for help for their child and, like you at the time, had no answers.
Can anyone suggest a free program for my 8yo, 2nd grader to be tested?
I am so glad a few of you have found the answers you were looking for. I am hoping for a light at the end of this tunnel where I find a way to help my daughter before she loses the LOVE of books and reading....
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replied June 23rd, 2013
Hello everyone
This is the first time I am reading this please understand that I am dyslexic an did not read every comment made. I am 30 and have lived with dyslexia since I was very young.
My mother does not believe that dyslexia is real so I struggled growing up.
My advice to you is to understand dyslexia as best you can and the only way I think this is posible is to speak with dyslexic people who are okay to talk about it.
I have it mildly but I learnt as an adult that it is best to be positive about it as you are more able to learn how to cope with it.
I have a very good memory that is how I learnd to cope by remembering how things looked.
I think you need to take your son to the options as they might be able to give him some special glasses that will help the way he sees the numbers and letters.
Also try using coloured paper for him to write on as white paper is hard for any dyslexic person to read or write on.
Try not to worry his life will only be hard if everyone around him is negative about it. Do not make him feel abnormal as this will mess up his confidence levels when he gets older.

Try the old saying if you don't have something nice to say then say nothing Smile



I hope this helps
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