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Wet hands causes extreme discomfort

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My ten-year-old daughter was diagnosed with OCD as early as 3 years of age. OCD runs in my family. My daughter used to always have her fists clenched as a baby/toddler. She finally started to unclench them, but whenever she bathes, she cries that her wet hands hurt and feel so uncomfortable. She cannot touch anything soft. She cannot use her hands for dressing, feeding, wiping, et cetera. She is always crying and saying she wants new hands. As her mother, my heart is breaking. She is on Paxil, 2.5 mg twice a day, liquid. After about 4-5 weeks with the medicine, she was saying it wasn't as bad after a shower, but 8 weks into it and it's just as bad. Is this OCD or a neurological problem? I would love to hear from any and all who have similar symptoms.
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First Helper User Profile Gaelic
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replied March 20th, 2011
Pain in my son's fingers after bath time
My seven year old son has a similar problem with his hands. He screams and cries if he is in the bath water more than 5 minutes. They become pruney extremely fast and he says it hurts him so bad. He was diagnosed with ADHD at age five. I don't know if this hand problem is a medical issue or neurological problem but it is getting worse with each bath or shower, to the point he doesn't want to bathe at all! I feel so bad for him and have tried to get help but nobody has ever heard of this issue! Any input would be appreciated!
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replied March 21st, 2011
Especially eHealthy
mrcv15 and mommyjj2003,

This could be sensory defensiveness. This is a condition defined as having "a tendency to react negatively or with alarm to sensory input which is generally considered harmless or non-irritating" to normal people.

It is not uncommon for a person to have a few mild sensory defensive traits. However, when the defensive traits impact the person's day-to-day life, that person is considered to be Sensory Defensive.

The symptoms may be brought on by one spefific type of input or it may be to several types of sensory input. Common types of stimuli that may precipitate sensory defensiveness include intolerance to noises, lights, touch, textures, smells, taste, and generally becoming overwhelmed when exposed to a lot of sensory stimuli at once.

Intolerance should not always be taken as unwillingness to be subject to the sensory stimuli; but rather, intolerance is an inability to process the sensory stimuli in any other way than as over-stimulating, because the sensory stimuli provokes a fight-or-flight reaction. This is also known as sensory overload.

It's believed that there may be multiple etiologies for sensory defensiveness, including: genetic factors, environmental conditioning, drug or alcohol abuse, sexual abuse, or premature birth. Those diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder report much higher than average rates of hypersensitivity to sensory stimulus. Also, stress usually increases sensitivity to sensory stimuli.

Stress due to reactions to sensory input can cause a chain reaction, leading to a meltdown. This may look much like a tantrum, the person may undergo dissociation, which causes him/her to withdraw into himself/herself. Individuals will often cope with their sensory difficulties by avoiding those situations that cause them irritation.

Sensory defensiveness is considered part of Sensory Integration Dysfunction. Sensory Integration Dysfunction may be included as a symptom of the autism spectrum, but a person does not have to display other autistic traits to have sensory defensiveness or sensory integration dysfunction. Sensory integration dysfunction and defensiveness are also common with developmental dyspraxia, cerebral palsy, and fetal alcohol syndrome.
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replied March 21st, 2011
Especially eHealthy
mrcv15 and mommyjj2003,

This could be sensory defensiveness. This is a condition defined as having "a tendency to react negatively or with alarm to sensory input which is generally considered harmless or non-irritating" to normal people.

It is not uncommon for a person to have a few mild sensory defensive traits. However, when the defensive traits impact the person's day-to-day life, that person is considered to be Sensory Defensive.

The symptoms may be brought on by one specific type of input or it may be to several types of sensory input. Common types of stimuli that may precipitate sensory defensiveness include intolerance to touch, textures, smells, taste, noise, lights, and generally becoming overwhelmed when exposed to a lot of sensory stimuli at once.

Intolerance should not be taken as unwillingness to experience the sensory stimuli; but rather, intolerance is an inability to process the sensory stimuli in any other way than as over-stimulating. Because the sensory stimuli provokes a fight-or-flight reaction. This is also known as sensory overload.

It's believed that there may be multiple etiologies for sensory defensiveness, including: genetic factors, environmental conditioning, drug or alcohol abuse, sexual abuse, or premature birth. Those diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder report much higher than average rates of hypersensitivity to sensory stimulus. Also, stress usually increases sensitivity to sensory stimuli.

Stress due to reactions to sensory input can cause a chain reaction, leading to a meltdown. This may look much like a tantrum, the person may also undergo dissociation, which causes him/her to withdraw into himself/herself. Individuals will often cope with their sensory difficulties by avoiding the situations that bother them.

Sensory defensiveness is considered part of Sensory Integration Dysfunction. Sensory Integration Dysfunction may be included as a symptom of the autism spectrum, but a person does not have to display other autistic traits to have sensory defensiveness or sensory integration dysfunction. Sensory integration dysfunction and defensiveness are also common with developmental dyspraxia, cerebral palsy, and fetal alcohol syndrome.

You may want to discuss this with a pediatric neurologist. No one can make a diagnosis over the internet and this was just provided as information. Hope you find the answers you are seeking. Good luck.
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replied April 29th, 2012
i have a similar problem.after having showers or swimming or just geting my hands wet,i can't basicly touch anything. when i clean dishes the feeling touching them makes me have a shiver down my back like scraping nail on a white board. this happens esspecial when i rub my hands together. this is bad because i have hyper hydrosis so i always have wet, sweaty hands.
please help me!!!!
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replied June 10th, 2012
Hand pain after shower
My 13 year old son has had this issue since about 4 or even earlier. He refuses to take showers and i try to understand and help him but nothing helps. He has been now diagnosed with childrens RA I dont think this is the cause PLEASE PLEASE HELP ME.... he is on a very dangerous drug methotrexate now and takes injections every week. We drive from pennsylvania to John Hopkins every two months and they just uped his dose Please anyone. I need help im dying inside watching him in this pain......
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