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treatment for alzheimers disease?

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Ok I guess I'll just ask these questions before I post the kind of proposed treatment.
1. What drugs or what could be used to help do this? I read that these drugs already exist. I know this is not a legitimate treatment, but could it possible be? I'm so desperate I don't really care what it takes. Just want some thoughts of whether this could actually work?

ANyways thank you so much for just reading or if you could possibly help it would mean everything

The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a major system maintaining body homeostasis by regulating the neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems as well modulating immune function. Recent work has shown that the complex dynamics of this system accommodate several stable steady states, one of which corresponds to the hypocortisol state observed in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). At present these dynamics are not formally considered in the development of treatment strategies. Here we use model-based predictive control (MPC) methodology to estimate robust treatment courses for displacing the HPA axis from an abnormal hypocortisol steady state back to a healthy cortisol level. This approach was applied to a recent model of HPA axis dynamics incorporating glucocorticoid receptor kinetics. A candidate treatment that displays robust properties in the face of significant biological variability and measurement uncertainty requires that cortisol be further suppressed for a short period until adrenocorticotropic hormone levels exceed 30% of baseline. Treatment may then be discontinued, and the HPA axis will naturally progress to a stable attractor defined by normal hormone levels. Suppression of biologically available cortisol may be achieved through the use of binding proteins such as CBG and certain metabolizing enzymes, thus offering possible avenues for deployment in a clinical setting. Treatment strategies can therefore be designed that maximally exploit system dynamics to provide a robust response to treatment and ensure a positive outcome over a wide range of conditions. Perhaps most importantly, a treatment course involving further reduction in cortisol, even transient, is quite counterintuitive and challenges the conventional strategy of supplementing cortisol levels, an approach based on steady-state reasoning.

This is the site from which it came from and more information on the treatment here:
http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info%3 Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pcbi.1000273
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replied July 7th, 2012
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There is something else science says is related to every disease and disorder. Glutathione, you may have heard of it. It's becoming talked about as word of mouth. I'm constantly finding more info on this everyday now. I assure you, there a lots of information on Alzhiemer and Glutatione.
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replied July 7th, 2012
Experienced User
There is something else science says is related to every disease and disorder. Glutathione, you may have heard of it. It's becoming talked about as word of mouth. I'm constantly finding more info on this everyday now. I assure you, there a lots of information on Alzhiemer and Glutatione.
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replied July 18th, 2012
Thanks for the info, its very interesting. My grandpa has alzheimer, and I would love to help him
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replied September 25th, 2012
Re: Alzheimer Disease Forum
The HPA axis is involved in the neurobiology of mood disorders and functional illnesses, including anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, insomnia, posttraumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, ADHD, major depressive disorder, burnout, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, and alcoholism. Antidepressants, which are routinely prescribed for many of these illnesses, serve to regulate HPA axis function
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replied October 17th, 2012
If you want to go over some of the options regarding non-drug related treatments, there's very few studies that deal specifically with HPA or others, but there's a significant body of evidence that any neurological disorders that deal with some sort of deficiency in repair of myelin sheaths, creation of new neural pathways/axons, and also increased connections between neurons. Here are a couple of studies that I've found
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/17/c arbs-cognitive-impairment_n_1970905.html
http://iospress.metapress.com/content/qh34 1365j35865q7/

The core of these studies rely on reduction of carbohydrates (decreased glucose dependence by the brain to about 75% ketones and 25% glucose - ketones are a more efficient energy transport system for neural connections) as well as increasing fat intake (saturated fats, normally vilified by the media, are actually essential to avoiding various neurological/metabolic diseases).

Hope this helps! And check out my facebook page if you're interested. Smile
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replied December 2nd, 2013
The homoeopathy treatment uses various drugs to relieve the Alzheimer symptoms and control the progress of Alzheimer disease. The duration of treatment varies as per the stage and the extent of the disease.
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replied February 20th, 2014
3 Important Reasons to Exercise & Test Memory

1. Memory testing could indicate an early issue: Did you know that memory testing through programs like MemTrax will allow users to potentially reveal indications of possible Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), dementia, or Alzheimer’s disease? Working through quick and simple memory testing activities could lead to the early detection of various cognitive conditions and could thus allow for better preparation or treatment.

2. See what your brain can do: Exercising your brain through memory testing and related activities keeps you personally aware of your own cognitive abilities. Be proactive at all times. Just because you aren’t in your twenties doesn’t mean that you can’t maintain sharp mental stamina. Working your brain through these manageable activities and tests will undoubtedly aid in gauging your own brain’s mental capacity as you move forward in your life.

3. Exercising the brain keeps your body fresh: Your brain is the central hub of the rest of your body; why wouldn’t you keep it as active as you would keep your legs or core? We take the time to go to the gym and eat healthy, yet many of us seem to forget that our brains are the most important part of our bodies and deserve an enormous amount of love and attention. Running on the treadmill may be a 30 minute battle for some of us, but remember that a memory testing through MemTrax only takes 3 minutes and can be done in the comfort of your own home without having to lace up those running shoes. Keep in mind that without the health of your brain, you might not be able to maintain such an active lifestyle.

Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive decline conditions don’t have to be part of your future, and by making smart decisions now, you are protecting yourself from potential complications later. After all, exercising your brain is quick and easy, what do you have to lose? Take the first step and try the MemTrax screening today!
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