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Transmission Through Drinks

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Hey guys

Im really paranoid about this incident, whether it may or may not get me infected with HEPATITIS B or even HIV

It goes like this:

I was buying a cold drink and saw how the guy prepared my drink. He stirred the drink with a stirrer and tasted the stirrer(I presume its to see whether the amount of ingredients added is right). After he tasted it, he put the stirrer back into my drink and stirred it again.

Knowing that I have bitten on my tongue a little(and it bled) in the morning, I hesistated whether or not to drink it. In the end, i did and now Im getting really very paranoid about whether there is a risk of transmission of diseases such as Hepatits B or even HIV. Im not really sure whether or not, at the point of drinking, my tongue was still bleeding.

Can some experts tell me whether is there any risk of infection of Hepatitis B or even HIV virus? What if there is blood in his saliva? If there isn't, does it make a difference? Please help me!
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replied January 16th, 2009
Community Volunteer
No, you cant get anything from him doing that but it is grouse.I would have told him to please make me another one and not drank it just because its disgusting but you cant get any disease from that.Even if he was bleeding...
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replied January 16th, 2009
thanks Homerx! but would you mind explaining to me why isnt there any risk?

There's an open wound on my tongue and if theres blood, won't there be some kind of transmission?
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Users who thank ohmygoose for this post: homerx 

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replied January 16th, 2009
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dont worry
No, the virus dies outside the body within seconds and cant live in liquid,especially alcohol..that would kill it instantly..take care! peace
Homer rainbow
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replied January 16th, 2009
thanks again for the reply!

Are you referring to the HIV virus or HEPATITIS B virus?

Or are you referring to the both of them?

Just wana make sure.. Im really paranoid. Rolling Eyes
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replied January 16th, 2009
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ohmygoose wrote:
thanks again for the reply!
Are you referring to the HIV virus or HEPATITIS B virus?
HIV...
Hepatitis B virus is spread or acquired through exposure to infected blood or the body's secretions. The highest concentrations of hepatitis B virus are found in the blood, semen, vaginal discharge, breast milk, and saliva. There are only low concentrations of hepatitis B virus in the urine and none in the feces. Therefore, hepatitis B is not spread through food or water or by casual contact. Furthermore, hepatitis B virus is no longer transmitted by blood transfusions because all blood for transfusion is screened (tested) to exclude contamination with hepatitis B virus.

In the U.S., adolescents and young adults account for the majority of reported cases of hepatitis B infection. Sexual contact (intercourse) is the most common means of transmission. The virus also can be spread by hepatitis B virus-contaminated blood or body fluid in several different ways. These ways include intravenous drug use, skin-popping (injecting under the skin), tattooing, body piercing, and acupuncture using unsterile instruments. Additionally, hepatitis B virus can be transmitted through the sharing of toothbrushes and razors. Finally, blood-sucking insects such as mosquitoes and bed bugs in the tropics have reportedly spread hepatitis B virus.

Last (but not least), hepatitis B virus can be spread from infected mothers to their babies at the time of birth (so-called vertical transmission). This is the most important means of transmission in regions where the hepatitis B viral infection is always present (endemic), such as in Southeast Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. The rate of transmission of hepatitis B virus to the newborn of highly infectious mothers is very high, approaching 100%. Moreover, as indicated earlier, almost all of these infants will develop chronic hepatitis B viral infection.
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Users who thank homerx for this post: ohmygoose 

replied January 16th, 2009
Thank you really for the wonderful effort in letting me know more.

I'll find out more about transmission of HEP B virus.

Last but not least, I would like to wish you a wonderful 2009 ahead Very Happy
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replied December 6th, 2009
help also needed
hi , i had a similar incident, where i feel like someone may have "planted something" in my drink they had made, if it had been infected blood, could it have been transmitted to me if i drank it about 1 minute after he made it?

thanks so much ,i am very worried!
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