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Galvanic Shock

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I just had a filling done yesterday and when I got home I was in unbearable pain. Every 15 to 30 minutes I was getting what felt like a shock in my teeth. Imagine when you bite a piece of tin foil but only magnify it 100 times. I was doubled over every time it happened. I call my dentist and he told me it was galvanic shock and it would go away in 24 hours.

Well I feel better today; it's still happening but it's not bad. My question is has anyone else ever gone through this? I would like to hear how bad the pain was for you. My wife was supportive but I was getting the feeling that she thought I was overreacting about the pain. For me, on a scale from 1 to 10 it was a 20. Maybe i'm just a big baby?

Looking forward to hearing anybody's stories.

Semper fi,

bob
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First Helper solongag0
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replied February 18th, 2009
Galvanic Shock
Heck No, Bob! You are not a big baby. I am going thru this as we speak. I just had a partial made and then a filling. I started getting this pain that felt like my face was inflamed and it shot thru my face, chin, ear neck. I went back to my dentist 3x before he figured it out. It hurts excruciatingly!!!My dentist took my partial but it still hurts just not as bad. Without the partial it now comes down to is it the filling and another filling or something wrong with the tooth.
Semper Fi,
Rick
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replied May 18th, 2009
Galvanic Shock
Your body may have gradually adapted to the Galvanic current and it may adapt to the toxic metals carried by the electric current but eventually it will poison several organs and functions in your body, not least your brain.
If you want to be healthy, avoid mercury amalgam. It should have been outlawed years ago

Anthony Hughes
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replied February 6th, 2010
Dear Bob
Dear Bod,
I'm a metallurgist. I'm not saying that I'm a profecient in corrosion scie but I've done several projects in this field. From the electrochemical point of view, this shock relates to the galvanic driving force between even dissimilar amalgam!! This will generate some galvanic current which it's transference through dental nerves causes "galvanic shock".
For the hazzardous effects of the amalgam, I should notice that although the alloy (amalgam) constituents may be poisenous by themselves, they in composition with other constituents defenetely show a different chemical or physical behaiviors.
I advise you not too drink hot drinks, not to contact metallic goods to your tooth and finally not to eat acidic foods or drinks.
I hope you will get better sooner than you expect.
Do not hesistate to contact me if you have any question.


Best Wishes,
Your friend,

Reza
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replied April 6th, 2010
Galvanic Shock with Amalgam Fillings
Hi Bob,
I had a huge problem with galvanic shock with my amalgam filling - one huge one in particular. Every time a utensil would touch my tooth when i was eating, it would send me through the roof. This went on for 2 yrs - dentist kept telling me that the galvanic shock shouldn''t be happening for so long - I finally replaced the amalgam filling with a composite filling and don''t have a problem any more !! Thank goodness - that was unbearable. Those amalgam fillings are bad news.
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replied May 14th, 2010
I just had the same thing happen to me! I went to the dentist and had an old filing removed. He asked me if i wanted a white filing and i was in a rush so i said "whatever is faster".. We went with the metal filing. When i got home i started to feel like a shock feeling whenever my saliva would touch my tooth. It got so bad i went back to the dentist and he said it was "galvanic shock". He applied some floride on it and the pain went away. But and hour later it is back!.. I just made an appointment to have the filing removed and replaced with white filings. I hope the pain will stop in 24 hours like they said!!!!!!

Fudge.
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replied August 25th, 2010
Galvanic shock
Same problem here. I had a filling yesterday in a tooth that sits next to another tooth that was rebuilt (with metal filling) about 15 years ago. After the anaesthetic wore off I started getting these jolting shocks in those teeth - oh my gosh, it was awful. I'm sure I looked like I was about to have a seizure in the grocery store later! I went back to the dentist and she said to rub boiled egg yolk on it. ???? I did that several times, but over two days it got no better, so tomorrow I'm having the new filling removed and replaced with a white filling. Why in the heck don't they ask you before you have a filling what sort you want? If I'd thought about it, I'd have chosen the white one in the first place. Now I would love to have the other two she did on the other side (but which aren't causing me any trouble) removed, but it's too expensive I'm sure. Good luck with yours - I have dental floss stuffed between my two affected teeth right now to prevent them from touching and driving me up the wall until tomorrow. That's a good short-term solution. Wonder how much floss I'll wind up swallowing in my sleep tonight?
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replied October 27th, 2010
galvanic shock
why dont these doctors just use the correct material on the teeth that galvanic shock hurts. does it get better with time. i dont want it removed but i want an alternative that it will heal quick. its driving me up the wall.
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replied January 10th, 2011
Galvanic Shock cured for me. (Anecdotal Evidence)
Accidentally, I experienced instant relief from Galvanic Shock when I ate a breakfast of bacon and eggs. I posited that the sodium nitrate in bacon had a mitigating effect upon the electricity flowing from a gold capped tooth which contacted a freshly repaired tooth with amalgam filling. The relief lasted 12 to 14 hours, so I cut a couple of 1" squares from my morning bacon and placed them in a small zip-lock plastic for carrying in my pocket for emergency relief. At bedtime, AFTER brushing, I chew one of the tiny squares, and the result was that I have no more pain. I suspect the shock-discomfort-factor will gradually lessen and eventually disappear. Meanwhile, I am absolutely pain free. Who says a little nitrate (nitrite) is bad?
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Users who thank mendelssohn7 for this post: kirks4 

replied September 22nd, 2013
Holy Crap! I just had a root canal done a week ago and had a temporary metal crown put in. I was fine for a few days and then I started getting shocked by it. It got so bad I couldn't sleep last night at all. Came across this post and, as skeptical as I was, I had my wife go out and buy some bacon to try this out since it was the only thing I could find.

No joke, that zapping went away the minute I ate a strip of bacon. I've been good now for 4 hours or so.

Thank you sir. You just saved me an emergency call to my dentist tonight! I'm getting my "permanent" crown put on next week so this won't be an issue too much longer, but you are a life saver!!

Bacon. A gift from the gods. Smile
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replied May 19th, 2011
galvanic current
As a dentist I have come across a few patients with this problem. As a patient, I have experienced it myself so I know what everyone has gone though!

The galvanic current flows when two different metals are in near contact. The saliva acts as the connector between either fillings in the opposing teeth, or teeth next door.

It is pretty difficult to predict whether a patient will have this problem although metal (amalgam) fillings should be avoided if they are going to bite on each other.

The only solution is either to wait until the tooth settles down (which it inevitably will in time), or have the filling removed and a white (composite) filling placed.
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replied May 19th, 2011
galvanic current
As a dentist I have come across a few patients with this problem. As a patient, I have experienced it myself so I know what everyone has gone though!

The galvanic current flows when two different metals are in near contact. The saliva acts as the connector between either fillings in the opposing teeth, or teeth next door.

It is pretty difficult to predict whether a patient will have this problem although metal (amalgam) fillings should be avoided if they are going to bite on each other.

The only solution is either to wait until the tooth settles down (which it inevitably will in time), or have the filling removed and a white (composite) filling placed.
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replied October 23rd, 2011
hi i also get this shock and have done for bout 20 years i avoid dentist as i cant bear the thought ov some1 going near my mouth with any type ov metal im 36 and in desperate need ov dentist work but am so scared ha yes scared ov going, this affects my daily life in a big way and have only today found that others suffer from this as i thought people was thinking i was going mad when i explained i was getting electric shocks . im hoping i find some help through this forum :0)
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replied November 22nd, 2011
Itching in the ear
After exhausting all other possible sources and spending money and time with ENT specialists, I wonder if the chronic itching in my ear inside and out might be due to galvanic shock. I have many fillings, gold, amalgam,composite etc. It reacts when there is movement in the air around the ear, when anything presses on the ear and really anytime. Does anyone have this condition? What can be done if anything. Jay
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replied November 22nd, 2011
Itching in the ear
After exhausting all other possible sources and spending money and time with ENT specialists, I wonder if the chronic itching in my ear inside and out might be due to galvanic shock. I have many fillings, gold, amalgam,composite etc. It reacts when there is movement in the air around the ear, when anything presses on the ear and really anytime. Does anyone have this condition? What can be done if anything. Jay
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replied September 20th, 2012
As I drove home from the dentist's office today, I started feeling the sensitivity. I've been home for about 30 minutes and the pain/annoyance level is through the roof! I can't even talk without the horrible shocks. I've gargled with salt water as my dentist recommended, and am now swishing Pepsi in my mouth. so far- still getting the horrible shocks. this is crazy! any other home remedies that might work for me? the dentist feels that this will be gone soon, but after reading all these responses on here- I'm not so sure. ughh Sad
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replied March 27th, 2013
I have the same problem going on. My dentist replaced an old silver (amalgam) filling in a tooth that is next to a gold crown. As soon a the novacaine started wearing off, I started feeling shocks. It hurt bad enough to make me yell OUCH out loud as I jumped out of my seat at work. As I yelled, it happened again. I quickly figured out that each time I move my tongue, I got jolted. I phoned my dentist, who suggested eating egg yokes (the sulfur counteracts the galvanic current). So I listened with disbelief to my dentist telling me that the metals in my mouth (ions) were not working well together. At about this time, I'm almost crying--wondering how much worse it will get and how long it will last. That was 4 days ago. I've been eating eggs and bacon (I read on the net where someone was eating bacon and possibly the nitrate helps). Anyway, the bacon seems to be helping. I, too, brought a little baggie of bacon to work to chew on when the problem starts back up. WEIRD, RIGHT? I'm wondering if I should go through the pain of having this replaced -- and why didn't my dentist think about this possibilty when he was putting the filling in? And why didn't he mention the health problems with amalgam?

More to my story -- I work at an electrical association. I was checking in with our electricians, who reminded me not to eat potatoes, which conduct electricity. They also said I could be more susceptible to lighting strikes. The sulphur in egg yokes seem to be a viable solution to them. They had some good laughs on me that day! I just wish I could wave a magic wand and have it be ok.

Thank you everyone on this page who has posted. I'm not sure I would have bought into this whole story without your stories. How rare or common is this? If it's pretty rare, I might consider forgiving my dentist. Right now I don't feel like I can trust anyone to put their hands on my teeth.
Diane
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replied November 12th, 2013
thanks to all this people that posted I thought I was going to loose my tooth and have to expend a fortune in my mouth again. I just had my partials made without insurance a bundle perhaps and a month later I had a filling and when I put my partials I received a shock. I had all my antibiotic and still no better. thanks to this post I'm going to my old Dr. miles away but have her remove this thing and refixed this metal filling.
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