Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Hypoglycemia Forum

Food Logs, Fruits, Uncooked Cornstarch?

1) are there any techies lurking here that might have found a good food log software program for the palm os? All the ones i've found are glucose trackers (which have as much use as a paperweight for us hypos...), or calorie counters ..... ?

2) stan and others - what is your take on fruits? (if there is another thread for this, would you point me to it?) i've been reading that mangos are ok due to the high fiber content? Is this true? A dream come true!! Has anyone tried the new "nectar" clif bars? Low gi, organic fruit/nut bars ...

3) uncooked cornstarch to help prevent nighttime hypo episodes. Which bar have you had luck with? I've tried the extend bar, and nitebite bars .... Not sure either is helping though ... Last night I had a can of tuna with a little mayo right before bed, that was a good choice I think, b/c I slept well and had no night sweats ....

It has been almost 3 weeks since i've had any caffeine, alcohol, or obvious source of refined sugar. So that in itself is something of an accomplishment, and a milestone...Right?
Did you find this post helpful?
|

User Profile
replied August 21st, 2006
Community Volunteer
1. I go to www.Nutritiondata.Com to learn all about nutrients, carbohydrate content and the like. Don't know of any programs or anything though.

2. Don't eat any of those bars. Make sure you carefully read through and/or print out my list of foods to avoid at first. If any fruit is not on that list it's okay, but only in small amounts! Small means like one half of an apple slice or a small spoonful of blueberries, that's it! Don't eat more than that at first.

3. Anything with cornstarch will make you sick and never get better. Don't eat anything made from corn and always read labels. Do not eat any of those bars, they probably have some sort of added trick organic sugar like turbinado or dehydrated cane juice.

4. It's good that you're avoiding those things, some people can't. Hopefully you'll get even better in not too long!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied August 28th, 2006
Hey stan while were on topic, what vitamins do u take? I think thats why im so tired im not taking any vitamin c or fiber-calcium and no multi-vitamin. I noticed on a multi-vitamin bottle I have it has glucose and sucrose listed as ingredients so I dont take them. Actually im not taking anything besides meat, oil, nuts, squash, lettuce, 2 big glasses of water.


Also any list of ok vegetables? That would be extremely helpful! Thx buddy

also what yogurt are you eating? I cant find any without some form of sugar.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied August 28th, 2006
Community Volunteer
Any vegetable not listed there is perfectly fine. The kind of vitamin you need is not going to be found at a supermarket, so I hope you have a whole foods or a natural food store nearby. You need to check the label and find one that has no ingredient derived from what you see on that list I made. They exist, and they're relatively cheap. Good ones will say on the label something like: no sugar, starch, artificial colors, flavors, preservatives, corn, yeast, wheat, grain, egg or milk products. Look for that. Also, when you get the vitamins, take one, put a penny in some water and wait about 30 minutes, then put one of the vitamins in the water. If it doesn't break down in about 10 minutes or so, it's crap and you might as well not even bother. It means you're hardly digesting any of it. The only yogurt you can get, if you want to try it (i suggest to wait until the second part of my diet, but it's up to you) is sheep's milk yogurt, preferably raw, but that's not easy to find. It should at least be from free range sheep. The best out there, which you can have actually delivered to your home is sheep's milk products are good for hypoglycemics because the protein content is high, whereas the carbohydrate content is low, and, more importantly, it's only about 10% sugar while cow and goat products are usually around 90% sugar.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied August 28th, 2006
Uncooked Cornstarch Bars (extend Bar, Nite Bites)
Stan,

in your original reply to this thread, you said (quoted here for conveinence and others benefit):

"
3. Anything with cornstarch will make you sick and never get better. Don't eat anything made from corn and always read labels. Do not eat any of those bars, they probably have some sort of added trick organic sugar like turbinado or dehydrated cane juice.
"

do you feel this way in spite of research that shows the uncooked cornstarch metabolizes very slowly and is therefore an effective means of preventing nighttime hypo attacks? (from pubmed)

------------------------------------------
1: diabetes res clin pract. 2001 sep;53(3):137-9. Related articles, links

the effect of extend bar containing uncooked cornstarch on night-time glycemic excursion in subjects with type 2 diabetes.



Dyer-parziale m.





the objective of this study was to determine the effects of ingesting a snack bar containing uncooked cornstarch (extend bar, clinical products, limited, key biscayne, fl) on nocturnal glycemic excursion in 28 adults (ages 22-78 years) with type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean hbalc 8.21+/-1.28%). Thirteen subjects were treated with oral agents, eight with a combination of insulin and oral agents, and seven with insulin alone. Subjects ingested the study bar (extend bar, containing 30 g of total carbohydrate, including 5 g of uncooked cornstarch, 3 g protein, and 3 g fat) for three evenings followed by a placebo bar for 3 evenings (30 g of total carbohydrate, 3 g protein, and 3 g fat), or vice versa. Pre-snack before bedtime, midnight and before breakfast finger stick blood glucose levels were compared to determine the incidence of hypoglycemia (<60 mg/dl), hyperglycemia (>250 mg/dl), and to calculate any differences in the group's mean blood glucose levels when ingesting the study versus the placebo bar. There were no episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. The mean blood glucose levels pre-snack at bedtime were nearly identical (extend bar value 117.5+/-45.6 mg/dl; placebo bar value 117.3+/-40.0 mg/dl; p=0.977), and lower at midnight and before breakfast on the extend bar nights compared to the placebo bar nights (extend bar, midnight value 127.9+/-31.0 mg/dl; placebo bar midnight value 148.2+/-32.1 mg/dl; p=0.0001; extend bar breakfast value 114.2+/-15.8 mg/dl; placebo bar breakfast value 158.49+/-30.3 mg/dl; p<0.0001). These data suggest that ingesting extend bar containing uncooked cornstarch as the nighttime snack may be an effective strategy to lesson the frequency of nocturnal and morning hyperglycemia in subjects with type 2 diabetes.


*** this link another study that is far more verbose and easier to read :
http://clinical.Diabetesjournals.Org/cgi/c ontent/full/19/1/4

-----------------------------------------

p.S. - I just tried the penny-in-the-glass-of-water trick and my vitamin failed miserably. But what source can you site for its scientific validity? It kinda sounds like a wives tale....
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied August 28th, 2006
Community Volunteer
The problem is you're referencing studies about cornstarch and diabetes. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar condition, yes, but totally different. The rate at which your blood sugar increases from different types of carbohydrates is one of the things you need to control to get better. Corn based products raise the blood sugar faster than something like a cup of lettuce. Sure, maybe it metabolizes more slowly, but we also have the double problem of our pancreas realizing when we're eating some with a high carbohydrate load. One bar with 30g? You're only supposed to be eating around 100g per day and that bar takes care of almost 1/3 your daily requirement, which isn't good at all. Using carbohydrates to return low sugar to normal levels is only acceptable for diabetes, not hypoglycemia because your pancreas will adapt and learn to release more insulin if you keep treating it that way. I know because that's what I did on my first diet (before I even knew I had it). It will slowly get worse and worse and then crash. Any foods that contribute to this must be avoided at first. The penny trick I read in a muscle magazine. I believe it was in one of last year's men's health or something like that. My wife's father first mentioned it, I read it, and then tried it with a few. Most mass-market vitamins, like centrum, are !**@!. I actually heard of this test before but that was the first time I saw it written.
|
Did you find this post helpful?