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Overactive Gallbladder 91% (Page 1)

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I've been having gallbladder attacks since the end of may. At first I wasn't sure what was wrong, I thought I had an ulcer or that my illness was stress related (still unsure if it is). Then I had a scan done that says my gallbladder is hyperkinetic & releasing too much bile, 91%. My gastro doctor suggests I have my gb removed. I've never had any surgeries and would rather not have one.

Has anyone ever had this condition, if so what happened, what causes it & what is the outcome? Please help i've been sick for way too long and am suffering pretty much everyday. I have an appointment with a surgeon tomorrow and would like to know more before I see him.

Thanks,
maria
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First Helper tlcp777
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replied August 21st, 2007
92%
Hey...well i had a hida scan done back in june and had a 92% and my doctor said i was good to go. Well i have had a thousand other tests done and i'm sick and sick of being sick too. So i came home to my home state and brought records with me to show my grandpa and uncle who are both doctors...and the first thing they said is that a 92% is BAD. So...i'm not real sure what to do b/c my stupid doctor i'm seeing doesnt think that 92 is bad...well it is.
But anyways...no i haven't had the surgery...just thought i'd post back...i'm new!
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replied September 20th, 2011
u have an overactive gallbladder, look it up, your doctor is stupid, u need it taken out and you will be good as new!!!
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replied September 12th, 2009
91%
I too have a 91% gallbladder function and have been sick for almost 2 years, Pain, diarrhea, high liver function, dizzy, bloated, and hart burn. one doc said 91% is normal and another one said its to high. I dont know what to think anymore. If you find out please let me know. I cant take this any more. Im only 23years old and wish every day that i get better or die soon. Please tell me anything you find out. thanks
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replied September 16th, 2009
Abdomen Pain
I too have 92%. Told by one doc its ok and another its too high. I have had many many test done and NOTHING. Pain is in upper abdomen like dull stomach cramps. Pain is Worse as day progresses. By evening pain is usually debilitating. Not too bad when I first get up. Going for another EGD first ERCP next Friday. Have had MRCP, Ultrasound, upper GI with SBF, Abdomen CT, CTA, EGD bloodwork X5, Taken too many meds to list....NOTHING. 46year old male Chronic diarrhea Symptoms first presented in May after routine EGD. Scared but will have Gallbladder removed if EGD/ERCP is Neg. Have to try something. Will post again if any cures. God Bless
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replied September 16th, 2009
gb
Please do and i wish you luck. Im also talking with my Doc about removing my gallbladder. I understand what your going through. I hope we find something out soon.
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replied October 3rd, 2009
93%
I've been having abdomoinal pains and other weird things happening since 2001. I have a small hiatal hernia and gastritis but it seemed like that wouldn't be causing this kind of chronic pain and acid reducers and ppi's don't help.I had a hita scan in 2004 I was 27 at the time and he said my gallbladder was a 93% and he never saw a gallblader that active but there was nothing wrong with that.I wonder if that's really true. This suffering has gone on long enough.
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replied October 12th, 2009
I have HIDA of 96% which is the highest my doctor has ever seen. He said it is rare but there is some evidence that an overactive gall bladder can lead to symptoms similar to that of gall stones and that he will refer me to a surgeon if my upper GI comes back clean. Looks like my gall bladder will have to go. I certainly can't live with this pain forever if I want to fully enjoy my life.
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replied October 21st, 2009
I just spoke to my GI, and my HIDA came back at 100%. I am going to get my gallbladder removed.
While looking into overactive gallbladder, I saw a link between celiac's and gallbladder disease. Most of the time when the overactive gallbladder is removed from the celiac it shows gallbladder disease.
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replied November 19th, 2009
overactive gallbladder 99%
I was diagnosed with 99% overactive and have seen 5 doctors been thru every test including a colonoscopy tom still the doctors arent convinced they should take my gallbladder out Im so miserable it bothers me more every day im down to 97 lbs cause everything bothers me anymore im living off of cream of wheat and toast thinking about telling to take my gallbladder out. Has anyone had theres out and felt better after a overactive gallbladder is diagnosed? tlc
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replied November 21st, 2012
My ejection fraction was at 99% also. I am miserable all the time..waiting on my Dr. to get the surgery scheduled...I WILL have that thing taken out...anything has to be better than this pain. Good luck!!
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replied November 24th, 2009
tlc, I am the same person who posted as Tigerfan above. There is a study that was done in the last year by a Doctor by the name of Holes-Lewis: Here is the text:

July 10, 2009 (Toronto, Canada) � Patients with suspected biliary dyskinesia but a biliary ejection fraction above the cut-off of 35% may benefit from cholecystectomy, according to research presented here at the Society of Nuclear Medicine 56th Annual Meeting.

Cholecystokinin heptobiliary scans were employed to assess patients with suspected biliary dyskinesia presenting with abdominal pain, explained Kelly Holes-Lewis, MD, a former chief resident in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the State University of New York in Buffalo, and now a resident in the Department of Psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

A diagnosis of chronic acalculous cholecystitis is made in patients with an ejection fraction of less than 35%. When the ejection fraction exceeds that percentage, patients are classified as normal, explained Dr. Holes-Lewis, who conducted the research while at the State University of New York in Buffalo.

"We know a lot about patients with low gallbladder ejection fractions � specifically, below 35%," said Dr. Holes-Lewis. "There is little known about patients who have high ejection fractions � in particular, those who have high gallbladder ejection fractions of 80% or more.

"We wondered if there is something at the other end of the spectrum that is pathological that is causing the severe, debilitating symptoms that these patients are having," she told Medscape Radiology. "They typically have pain that is felt after having a fatty meal and may cause nausea and vomiting."

Patients who are suspected of having biliary dyskinesia frequently present with comorbid anxiety, noted Dr. Holes-Lewis.

She and her colleagues retrospectively analyzed 108 patients during a 1-year period who had received cholecystokinin hepatobiliary scans and had gallbladder ejection fractions of 80% or greater. Questionnaires were obtained from primary care providers about patients' symptoms, whether a cholecystectomy was performed and � if it was performed � whether symptoms improved, were partially resolved, or completely resolved. Complete data were obtained for 63 patients.

A cholecystectomy was performed in cases in which the scan was negative if there was clinically significant pain, said Dr. Holes-Lewis. She noted that the scans had ruled out the presence of any gallstones in the gallbladder.

A total of 28 (44%) of 63 patients with high ejection fractions received a cholecystectomy. Twenty-seven (97%) of 28 patients indicated that they had improvement in their symptoms after the procedure, and 22 (79%) of 28 patients said they had total resolution of their symptoms. One patient did not respond to the procedure. Investigators did not gather data on those patients who did not receive a cholecystectomy.

The data are preliminary at this point, but the findings suggest that surgery may be warranted despite a high ejection fraction, according to Dr. Holes-Lewis.

"We want to pursue this further and see if there is some pathology at the other end of the spectrum of gallbladder disorder that would be amenable to surgical correction," she said. "A lot more work needs to be done before we recommend surgical removal."

She speculated that a possible explanation is that patients might have an increased density of cholecystokinin receptors that, in response to a fatty meal, cause the gallbladder to clamp down intensely and result in pain, despite the absence of a low ejection fraction.

"It is very interesting preliminary work," said Harvey Ziessman, MD, professor of radiology in the Division of Nuclear Medicine at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

"If it is true, it will have an important clinical impact in that it's suggested that patients with hyperkinetic gallbladders get better after cholecystectomy," he said. "Most of those patients don't get referred for cholecystectomy because it's usually the patients with low gallbladder ejection fractions that get referred. We focus on the lower levels of normal. If this is correct, we have to start paying attention to the upper levels."

The research also raises the issue of neurohumoral etiology of gastrointestinal diseases, added Dr. Ziessman.

Dr. Ziessman noted that the researchers need to gather more retrospective data to confirm their findings and then consider conducting a prospective study. "They need a lot more patients and...to examine this further," he said.

The study was independently conducted. Dr. Holes-Lewis and Dr. Ziessman have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Society of Nuclear Medicine 56th Annual Meeting: Abstract 1312. Presented June 15, 2009.

J Nuclear Med. 2009;50:453P.

You certainly should see a doctor and ask if he knows of the study.
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replied December 15th, 2009
Hi Tigerfan2 Thank-you for the information you sent I was wondering if you had your gallbladder out or if anyone you personally know has that was diagnosed with a hyperkinetic gallbladder? Im sceduled for surgery on fri dec 18 and was told theres a chance it will help but theres also a chance it wont. So tired of feeling like i do that im taking the risk. Let me know anyone of u as soon as possible. Wish me luck Im nervous about the whole thing. Thanx tlcp777
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replied December 29th, 2013
Did your surgery work? I have an ejection fraction of 99%. John Hopkins is not sure if they take it out if it will help or not.
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replied December 16th, 2009
Well guess what? I have mine taken out tomorrow. Good luck, and I too am really nervous but have to risk it to have a shot to get my life back. I wish the best for you, I keep forgetting my password so I keep making up a new name to post!
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replied February 15th, 2010
Gall Bladder removal
tigerfan22, How are you doing now post-op? Was your symptoms relieved after your GB was removed. I had a Hida Scan today and was told mine GB is 94%. I was already scheduled for a laparoscope in 2 days to see if they can figure out why I am having all these symptom. Wondering if I should just have them remove it while they are in there. I have all the gastric symptoms, but my pain is left lower side not right upper, where the GB is located..
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replied January 25th, 2012
CAT63, I was so excited when I read your reply! My pain is always in my lower left quadrant as well! And that is part of the reason why my doctor is not quite sure about things. However, my HIDA scan showed an EF of 86%, so while not as bad as yours, I am still definitely above the normal range, but I am so glad that I finally found someone with the same referred pain as me. Have you had your gb out or anything?
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replied March 18th, 2010
Hida Scan 91% Ejection Fraction
Hi, I too have been suffering for 2 years with constant pressure under the right rib cage and a knawing pain where my gallbladder should be. I also suffer from constant nausea sometimes waking me up in the middle of the night for no reason. I recently started getting a pressure in my upper right shoulder that felt like someone was pushing on me from the outside and it burns like a pulled muscle. I had an upper/lower sonogram of the gallbladder (normal and no stones), colonoscopy (normal), EGD (showed chronic gastrits), and I just had a hida scan which showed an ejection fraction of 91%. My doc states it is normal but why do I feel like this? My doc did refer me to a GI specialist and will see them in April. I have also been tested for Celiac's but the test were normal but I do feel better on a gluten free diet. If I cheat a little, the pressure comes right back. Any ideas? Has anyone found out anything about their symptoms?
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replied April 3rd, 2010
11 years old with hyperactive gallbladder
My son is 11 and has had an Abdominal CT, EDG, esophageal ultrasound, rectal exams, ultrasounds, MRCP, and HIDA scan. His HIDA scan came back with ejection fraction of 90%. We have been to the best children''s hospital around and possibly the nation (Riley Children''s Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana). They keep sending us to a different department. He was told by the GI specialist that he was 30 pounds overweight. I know for a fact that it doesn''t hurt to be fat. I personally think that they were looking for new people for a new clinic they just opened for overweight children. He''s been allergy tested and had dozens of labs done. Everything but the hida scan comes back ok. He has gallbladder symptoms constantly--nausea, diarrhea, spasms, all in the right upper quadrant under his rib cage. This has been going on for 5 months. He has missed a ton of school days and is now considered truant because the doctors can''t find anything wrong. We have a surgeon consult next week and I am praying he will listen to me. This has gone on long enough. My son can''t function as a normal child and he has had enough. He lies on the floor and cries and begs me to do something. It''s so sad!
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replied April 13th, 2010
Hi, Calliope3129 here - I just realized i posted this in 2006 & have had my gallbladder removed since 9/2006 - I''ve been totally healthy since. No more crazy stomach aches or any issues. I have also since been a vegetarian & avoid most dairy. If your gallbladder is overactive - get that puppy removed!!! You''ll be much happier & healthier without the pain & aggravation.

Good luck to all!!!!
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replied April 20th, 2010
overactive gallbladder, pain, celiac?
Has anyone "cured" their overactive gallbladder by following a celiac diet?

I asked my gastro to check me (4years ago) and the biospy was negative. Since a year and a half ago, I have had a constant burning pain in the gallbladder area. Had a HIDA scan and it came back 92%. The gastro said he had never seen one that high and it must be good.

Talked to a nuclear med tech I met and she said that is NOT a good number. Started to research on my own and it is a strong indicator of celiac. Started to follow a gluten free diet about a week ago and I have been slammed with the worst pain ever.

Going back to see if they will run the celiac antibody test in a couple of days and hoping my gallbladder attack will subside.

Also, has anyone had success liver flushing with an overactive gallbladder?
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Users who thank grumpysnoopy for this post: lilsackkk 

replied April 29th, 2010
I will tell anyone and everyone that has an EF of 85% or higher...FIND A DOCTOR TO REMOVE THE GALLBLADDER!!! I had a EF number of 95% and found a doctor back home that my mother works with who said to remove it. So I went home and this particular doctor perform the surgery. I had the surgery a month ago and have never felt better. All my pain, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, diarrhea and constipation are gone. PLEASE PLEASE listen to me...Surgery is scary and I had never had surgery before and was crying my eyes out the whole way back to the operating room and yes was in pain for about 1 week and then very mild pain for the 2-3 weeks afterwards but I have never, no matter how much pain or soreness after surgery, regretted it for 1 second of any day. I promise that it will give you quite a bit of relief if not total relief!
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replied May 23rd, 2010
Gall bladder dyskinesia
See above article, text posted by tigerfan2.

I shoved this article into the medical residents hand when they were trying to tell me my gall bladder function was normal, and wanted to run a number of other tests. The HIDA scan report said "normal," but both my husband and I saw my response to the CCK injection during the scan (my whole side convulsed in response- it took 1 hour and 4mg of morphine to get it to stop) . . .and the technician (who reported the "normal" result, mind you) even remarked at how quickly my gall bladder emptied- turns out is was a 95% ejection fraction, and when I described what happened to the attending physician (who I had to get a patient advocate involved before they would see me), she said, oh! I wish I had known this, I would have had you in surgery yesterday to have it out (this is after a 5 day hospital stay of NPO, oxycodone, & morphine to control pain). So I had it out. Pain was gone, no more spasms. That was 2 months ago.

Now I am having RUQ pain again, not spastic this time, and controllable with oral pain meds at home, so not as intense as original bout of pain. However, they have no idea what is causing it- endoscopy to duodenum is negative, and surgeons insist that it could not be from the surgery (would have shown up sooner). I have found numerous blogs discussing this phenomenon, many with physicians dismissing it as IBS. Other possibilities: Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (which most GI specialists sneer at, and the surgery carries a pretty high risk of pancreatitis), and now the most plausible that I can find, Thoracic nerve problems (either a pinched nerve or herniated disc in T9)- I am somewhat beginning to wonder if this might even be the source of my gall bladder dysfunction. Trying to get an appointment with an osteopath later this week to ask his opinion, while still meeting with general surgery team who removed my gall bladder, and trying to get an appointment with a GI specialist.

Female, aged 30, had two kids, healthy eater, takes vitamins, fairly decent exercise with history of athleticism, not overweight, non-smoker, do not drink excessively or take any illicit drugs and do not even take over the counter drugs very frequently (only if I have a cold).
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replied June 14th, 2010
99%
I too have a 99% gall bladder function. After reading all of this I went to the surgeon today and he refused to take my gall bladder out. He wants me to have a CT scan and see the GI doctor. I had the light run down my throat in August so I know everything is ok there. I have been my liver is fine, they have tested me for celiac disease and that is all normal. My regular doctor said that there is not a lot out there on this and I might have a hard time finding someone to take it out. She really could not say what they would be looking for on a CT scan. This is crazy. She is sending me to another surgeon for a second opinion. I hope I can get some help.
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replied September 20th, 2011
it is an overactive gallbladder 4 SURE, u need to find some1 2 take it out rite now and you will be back to normal!!!
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