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Injury And Gout

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I have been diagnosed with gout now for about three years. Even though I think I may have been having gout attacks a lot longer than this. I was wondering if an injury to your foot can set a gout attack off. I also have charcot marie tooth a form of motor nerone. So I tend to go over a lot on my ankles. I have had a bad attack now for four days as I went over on my ankle last weekend. Can this happen?
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First Helper JYY2
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replied May 14th, 2006
Experienced User
Charcot's joint and gout have similar symptoms. To be sure you have gout, you need to test the joint fluid for msu crystals (arthrocentesis). Yes, injuries to the joints such as sprain are known to trigger gout attacks. Avoid using colchicine to treat gout as its toxicity can exacerbate charcot-marie-tooth. More gout info can be found at http://www.Icuredmygout.Org. Good luck.

Interestingly, the doctoral thesis of Dr. Jean martin charcot (1825-1893) -- the founder of modern neurology and the discoverer of charcot's joint and charcot-marie-tooth-- presents the original work to differentiate gout from other forms of chronic rheumatism.
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replied May 14th, 2006
The only test I have ever had to diagnose gout is a blood test and I have this quit often. Does this give you a definate diagnose of gout or do you have to have the joint fluid tested? Is colchincine the colgout or the progout?
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replied May 14th, 2006
Experienced User
Gout attacks are caused by monosodium urate (msu) crystals in the joints. Therefore, the best way to diagnose gout is to have joint fluid tested to id msu crystals. The blood uric acid test is not a very reliable diagnostic tool for gout because: 1) about 80~92 % of people who have abnormally high uric acid level do not have gout in their life time, 2) during gout attacks, kidneys excrete extra uric acid such that about 50% of gout patients have normal uric acid level, 3) the blood uric acid level can fluctuate during the day (up to 1~2 mg/dl or more, normal 4.5~7.2 mg/dl) depending on physical and mental activities, level of hydration/dehydration, use of medicines, injestion of alcohol, time after meals, ... No wonder many recent medical publications state that the blood uric acid test alone is the most misused test in diagnosis of gout. Joint fluid test is the only sure way to diagnose gout -- provided the test is done properly.

Colgout is colchicine. It is used to reduce inflammation and pain caused by gout. Its side effects include neuropathy and myoneuropathy which exacerbate charcot-marie-tooth. Therefore, it is a medicine to avoid for c-m-t patients.

Progout is allopurinol. It's used to lower the blood uric acid level to reduce the frequency and severity of gout attacks. It does not reduce the inflammation and pain from gout attacks. It should be taken continuously. When allopurinol is initiated, it can significantly drop the uric acid level rapidly (up to 2~3 mg/dl, normal 4.5~7.2 mg/dl) and trigger gout attacks. So, if a patient uses allopurinol on and off, it will keep triggering gout attacks.
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replied August 9th, 2013
Old injury and gout
About 30 years ago I sustained an injury to my left foot. A nail gun misfired and put an 8 penny nail through the second metatarsal about an inch back of my toe. That's been the precise location of recurring gout since 2003. I've made lifestyle and dietary changes (Quit drinking except on rare occasion and cut out red meat) and it still comes back every couple months. I can get Prednisone from the VA, but cider vinegar and pomegranate juice seem to do a pretty good job without a prescription. The fact that it always occurs in the same spot where I was injured isn't just a coincidence, is it?
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replied October 23rd, 2013
I have had gout for 2 years and only had 2 attacks up until a few weeks ago. Those 2 attacks were minor and the doctors I saw (podiatrist and internist on 2 separate occasions over the course of a year) were not concerned with the intensity of the attacks. I was not prescribed any drugs for the two instances, and my uric acid level was checked about a year ago and the doctor did not seem concerned at the time either.

About a month ago I stubbed my toe when I slipped and fell down my stairs. I have size 15 feet so slips and falls and stubs are very easy for me. The stubbed toe was the same toe that had previously been infected with gout. A few days after I thought I fully recovered, I had the most extreme gout attack to date. I could not walk for approximately 5 days, and for 10 days I had a fever over 100, headaches, I developed pleurisy and generally felt like I had the flu and a knife stuck in my toe at all times.

When I saw a doctor again all he could tell me was that had I not injured the toe, I would not have gotten the gout attack. I'm not sure that makes any sense to me or makes me feel better considering there are so many bad health-related considerations when it comes to gout. How can I be sure gout is a result of injury and not something more major? Every doctor and website I google seems to have a different opinion. This is a darn screwy little disorder.
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