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Mysterious, Numerous Brown Spots Overnight (Page 6)

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December 11th, 2010
Mine are approximately 5 - 10 spots, approx 0.2 - 0.5 mm and starts as a dark spot fading over 14 days - appearing on the inside tips of my thumbs (both) and one spot to the right of my ringfinger nail. So far, I've had these come and go over the years, that's why I don't try topical creams or anything, because they will fade when your skin regenerates in approx 2 weeks. Color and depth in the skin (just under the surface) leads me to believe it could be the ends of blood vessels, or someone earlier mentioned possibly iodine. Mine is (I believe) stress-related and appears approx a week or so after prolonged periods of stress (exams when a student, now stress periods at work - quarterly reforecasts, budget times, etc). I do not eat or touch citrus fruits, I do not drink excessively, and smoke only 2 - 3 cigarettes a day. It is not fungal or bacterial, does not itch, but does sometimes have tiny bumps with clear fluid - you understand that these things are 0.2 of a mm! It is under the outer layer of skin, but like the guy that cuts it off, it is not deep and you can dig around with a needle like removing a thorn.
So to sum up: I feel mine are stress-related, but would still like to know what the medical cause of it is - blood-vessels etc?
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replied December 17th, 2010
These spots looks like not an allergic one but realting derma infections because of the less oxygen level in tissues and its solution is to have as much oxygen source which will eradicate these. medicines will be a good solution but it will effect for some period but a proper course of red wines will help.
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replied February 7th, 2011
Brown spots on skin
I was getting ready For a shower when I looked In the mirror and noticed these brown spots on my shoulders that have never been there. They Were small,like freckles, when turned around I noticed them all over my back I'm freaking Out some of them are so dark they look like Beaty marks. This is very recent because I have like a whole outbreak on the top of my shoulders and arms and all over my back If anyone hears anything please post oh and by the way I haunt been in the sun at all
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replied February 16th, 2011
Brown pin head sized spots, with dying skin
Sounds like there are definitely two different skin things going on here. I for one don't have spots, but just noticed today while in the hot tub, that my right index finger has 5 brown pin head like dots, 1 of them is raised almost like a wart(the center has a small brow dot in it).

I became pretty curious and started to check all of my right hand, then moved to my left hand, phew nothing there, oh wait... crap.. I noticed a "cluster" of these brown pin head spots located on the outside palm close to the wrist area, strange thing with these is the skit is pretty much dead, I can peal them right off, well.. some of them.. others I can't because the skin isn't dead... this has pretty much freaked me out. I just turned 30, I am male. Never had anything like this before. To make sure there is no confusion, these are not blotch like or patch like, not large at all, they are barely noticeable until you look directly at them.

The only thing after reading all these posts I can think of is maybe mango, but the mango I consumed over the last 2 weeks was in juice form with rum(not a bad boat drink), so I definitely haven't touched, lime, mango or lemons in a while.

My diet does consist of eggs(just about every other morning for the last 3 weeks). I have also introduced mixed nuts(cashews, dried cranberries, pecans). I also switched out my bread from whole wheat to sprouted grains to knock out the soy intake.

I have no clue what these tiny brown pin head spots are, I am leaning more towards the fungus thing. More research needed on this one.
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replied February 28th, 2011
brown spots on the skin
Ive had them too but im a muslim and i wear a scarf so basically im rarely exposed to that amount of sunlight and im only 20
i had them overnight, ITS CRAZY painless my sister noticed them on my neck, all over it
they said its age, i said im 20
they said its sun i said im not exposed to it
then they said its a post inflammatory hypermelatonin something like that and it could be hereditary since color changes on the skin due to disruption of hormones that regulate melanin due to pressure and stress which could be it
anyhow im going to the doctor and il see what hed tell me
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replied February 28th, 2011
For who have brown spots that are bleeding
ive had this issue long time ago, now it changed but not much better, ive had it 3 years ago when it was just brown spots on my finger, i ignored it for like a year until it started to itch so badly
i went to an amazing dermatologist after trying several ones who are idiots
first of all, she said u need to takecare of ur skin ,its dry so she told me to keep neutrogena in my pocket every time id use it even it 10 times a day, and she gave me a GREAT cream named ELOCOM theres cream and ointment, only the ointment works but not the cream, twice a day leave for several hours put gloves or something
one more thing, she said that these come and go and shes right coz i had them when i was 5 but i had them again 3 years ago, theyre treatable with cortisol needles in every finger however cortisone will suppress ur immune system and will cause u several other problems so she said unless it gets very serious and the bleeding never stops, wed consider the needle option
they started bleeding after they were brown, now they disappeared but i still have some cuts too tiny that show up whenever i stop the ointment for several days
so u guys if u have that its alright, treatable just eithe rbuy the medicine or consult a doctor
most importantly, u should know how the food helps. when my mom found it out, she changed my WHOLE LIFE STYLE, every break, pasta, anything with doughs are now organic and brown, also same to sugar ( brown sugar)
try organic food, STAY away from fried food its a disaster because all fast food resturant they use the oil the same day for all fries and thats not good since oil can take 2-3 tmes max then it should be thrown away, and when its used alot it begins to harm ur body
if ur stressful, find a different way to look and deal with ur life because stress also raises ur cortisone, shuts down ur immune system and u become prone to any sort of cancer , god forbid, disorders, mood swings, allergies, inflammation and infections
i hope i helped
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replied March 2nd, 2011
I've got brown henna like stains on my left breast and torso... I did make Lime juice yesterday, but was fully dressed and have no stains on my hands or face (used my mouth to squeeze them like Oprah). It's really bizarre and I had no idea what they were. I spent that morning catching up with a friend under fig trees and thought maybe it was from that, but again, no stains on my clothes, just my skin. This has got me REALLY stumped as I've made lime juice many many times in my life (love it!) and have never experienced anything like it!! My husband thinks it looks like henna too (dark brown - they look like flat moles) but because my tummy skin is so stretched (I had BIG twins a year ago) the colour is sort of "bleeding" at the edges... I can only pressume it's from the lime, but it still has me completely perlexed as I have no stains on my clothes and was fully dressed with two layers, a singlet and a shirt. Hmm?
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replied March 12th, 2011
I found i have these same spots, not anywhere near as dark as liver spots, but showing up between my thumb and forefinger seemingly overnight. I've had this happen once before and they disappeared about two months. In doing a little research I have read that it can be from very dry skin. I started a pottery class 6 weeks ago and my hands are very dry from the clay and washing them more than usual. So the person doing painting might have them for the same reason. I found from most research that it's nothing to panic over unless it looks like a mole is raised or very dark brown to black.
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replied April 15th, 2011
Metal-nitrates
I just had these for the first time, and it turns out it is common in my industry (research chemistry). It is due (in my case!) to nitrates. I use them a lot and sometimes I dont put gloves on all the time, and apparently the nitrate compounds I am using can stain and cause this sort of reaction. Might not be the case for all of you, but that is mine!
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replied April 18th, 2011
hi , i am a 16 girl whose very light skinned and have noticed that overnight these small spots appeared (the biggest one being about a millimeter ranging to a pin dot and almost not visible) they are very dark, almost black or completely black, and appeared first on the soles and balls of my feet, also on the bottom of my toes and in between them,( about 30-50 on my right foot) and 8 or so on my left foot, there were also 4 on my left hand knuckles (index and middle finger) . now it is a few days later and i have noticed some on the palm of my hand and on my fingertip, and on the side of my right hand. one is on my big toe nail on the right foot and more appeared on my foot ( some are on top of my toes now). i didn't touch any mangoes or limes; which probably wouldn't effect my foot soles anyways. they don't itch, burn or anything, they are completely flat. NOT RAISED AT ALL. i dont know what they are or how they got there, but if anyone knows what this is , please inform me.
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replied May 28th, 2011
Hello,
I think you should go see an Endocrinologist or any Dr. and get some blood work. Ask them to check your hormone levels: ACTH and Cortisol. My pigmentation/ discoloration was on my knuckles. It was very odd. It wasn't black like yours, it was an orange brown weird tan.

I remember researching the same thing about 2 months ago online: "discoloration/ pigmentation on knuckles/ hands that had appeared overnight and wouldn't remove. I thought it was nothing, I was wrong. I saw my dr. and the first thing she said to me was ADDISON'S DISEASE. I was referred to an Endocrinologist and apparently I have Addison's Disease. I am being transfered to see a specialist at Cedars Sinai this month. Apparently brownish discoloration is the first prominent sign of Addison's. Please do NOT dismiss this. GO SEE YOUR DR. This could be serious, or it could be nothing- whatever you do, don't just ignore it. I have always been healthy my whole life. I live a totally health- conscious lifestyle and maintain a veggetarian diet. I don't know how I contracted this disease but I did. My point is, it can happen to anyone. See your doctor.
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replied May 21st, 2011
Question from Norway
Hi, i'm a girl from Norway. I have the exact same thing that most of people here do/did. Small brown spots on my RIGHT hand, nowhere else. And the came overnight. I think this is a little strange! Almost all who wrightes here have the same symphtons. And all the doctor says is go to the doctor... No wonder people are a litte afraid.
I have had mine fore almost two weeks now and they are not faiding at all. I have not been i contact with any citrus fruits. I have not been in the sun.

I tried to put some lime on my left hand and went out in the sun one day. Nothing. It was sunnyer that day than the day before i got the spots.

I guess an american doctor cant answer an norwegian girl (tax and all that), but I cuold not find a norwegian site to ask on for free.

Have a nice summer! Don't mix sun and lime, kids Smile
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replied May 28th, 2011
Hello,
I think you should go see an Endocrinologist or any Dr. and get some blood work. Ask them to check your hormone levels: ACTH and Cortisol.

I remember researching the same thing about 2 months ago online: "discoloration/ pigmentation on knuckles/ hands that had appeared overnight and wouldn't remove. I thought it was nothing, I was wrong. I saw my dr. and the first thing she said to me was ADDISON'S DISEASE. I was referred to an Endocrinologist and apparently I have Addison's Disease. I am being transfered to see a specialist at Cedars Sinai this month. Apparently brownish discoloration is the first prominent sign of Addison's. Please do NOT dismiss this. GO SEE YOUR DR. This could be serious, or it could be nothing- whatever you do, don't just ignore it. I have always been healthy my whole life. I live a totally health- conscious lifestyle and maintain a veggetarian diet. I don't know how I contracted this disease but I did. My point is, it can happen to anyone. See your doctor.
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replied April 10th, 2012
Hjelp!
Hei!

Vet det er en stund siden du skrev dette, men jeg er en norsk jente (25 aar) som har akkurat samme problemet!!! Skjoenner ikke hva det kommer av, og blir helt stressa for om det skulle vaere skin cancer eller noe lignende! .. :S
Fant du ut av hva det var? Gikk det bort? Har hatt det i ca 3 uker naa, null fading!

Det er en skummel verden vi lever i...

Any help is appreciated! Smile

Klem fra fellow Norwegian Wink
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replied May 28th, 2011
Brown Discoloration/ Pigmentation on skin
I remember researching the same thing about 2 months ago online: "discoloration/ pigmentation on knuckles/ hands that had appeared overnight and wouldn't remove. I thought it was nothing, I was wrong. I saw my dr. and the first thing she said to me was ADDISON'S DISEASE. I was referred to an Endocrinologist and apparently I have Addison's Disease. I am being transfered to see a specialist at Cedars Sinai this month. Apparently brownish discoloration is the first prominent sign of Addison's. Please do NOT dismiss this. GO SEE YOUR DR. This could be serious, or it could be nothing- whatever you do, don't just ignore it. I have always been healthy my whole life. I live a totally health- conscious lifestyle and maintain a veggetarian diet. I don't know how I contracted this disease but I did. My point is, it can happen to anyone. See your doctor.
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replied May 28th, 2011
Brown Discoloration/ Pigmentation on skin
I remember researching the same thing about 2 months ago online: "discoloration/ pigmentation on knuckles/ hands that had appeared overnight and wouldn't remove. I thought it was nothing, I was wrong. I saw my dr. and the first thing she said to me was ADDISON'S DISEASE. I was referred to an Endocrinologist and apparently I have Addison's Disease. I am being transfered to see a specialist at Cedars Sinai this month. Apparently brownish discoloration is the first prominent sign of Addison's. Please do NOT dismiss this. GO SEE YOUR DR. This could be serious, or it could be nothing- whatever you do, don't just ignore it. I have always been healthy my whole life. I live a totally health- conscious lifestyle and maintain a veggetarian diet. I don't know how I contracted this disease but I did. My point is, it can happen to anyone. See your doctor.
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Did you find this post helpful?

replied May 28th, 2011
Hello,
I think you should go see an Endocrinologist or any Dr. and get some blood work. Ask them to check your hormone levels: ACTH and Cortisol.

I remember researching the same thing about 2 months ago online: "discoloration/ pigmentation on knuckles/ hands that had appeared overnight and wouldn't remove. I thought it was nothing, I was wrong. I saw my dr. and the first thing she said to me was ADDISON'S DISEASE. I was referred to an Endocrinologist and apparently I have Addison's Disease. I am being transfered to see a specialist at Cedars Sinai this month. Apparently brownish discoloration is the first prominent sign of Addison's. Please do NOT dismiss this. GO SEE YOUR DR. This could be serious, or it could be nothing- whatever you do, don't just ignore it. I have always been healthy my whole life. I live a totally health- conscious lifestyle and maintain a veggetarian diet. I don't know how I contracted this disease but I did. My point is, it can happen to anyone. See your doctor.
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replied June 3rd, 2011
I have been reading all of the posts on here as I have been experiencing similar symptoms too. Only in the last few months since becoming pregnant I have awoke with stained patches on my hands much like henna or fake tan (of which I dont use either). The lime theory does not apply to me as I dont consume them, however I have had a craving for fresh cherries. I have eaten these before in my life and never has this patchy problem on my hands. Also yesterday (being in baby mode) I had a spring clean in the kitchen using household chemicals such as dettol and coming into contact with grease, could this be a cause of the patches?

Its baffling how no one has definitive answers! I am going to speak to my midwife about it and see what she says, when I know more I will be back to update.

Good luck all
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replied June 3rd, 2011
I found this article on the website : http://www.bettermedicine.com/article/dark ened-skin

Darkened skin, or hyperpigmentation, is the appearance of patches of skin that become darker than the surrounding area. The change in color happens when there is overproduction of melanin, the pigment normally found in the skin, forming deposits that darken the skin color. Darkened skin can develop in people of all races.

Commonly, darkened skin appears as fairly small spots, called “age spots” or lentigines, which can be caused by sun damage acquired over a long period of time. In fact, sun exposure is one of the most common causes of darkened skin. Energy from the ultraviolet rays of the sun is absorbed by melanin as a normal way to protect the skin from overexposure. This can also darken areas that already have hyperpigmentation.

Sometimes darkened skin occurs as a result of a hormonal change (for example, during pregnancy or with the use of birth control pills) or as a symptom of a particular disorder, such as café au lait macules, which are light or dark brown patches of skin present from birth, or Addison’s disease, which is characterized by deceased production of hormones by the adrenal glands. Darkened skin can also result from a combination of sun exposure and an allergic reaction, usually to a specific plant or chemical.

In some cases, darkened skin can be temporary, such as during pregnancy or while using birth control pills. Some, but not all, forms of hyperpigmentation can be effectively lightened with medications or lasers; other forms can fade with a change in medication or a change in hormone levels.

Darkened skin is not a symptom of a life-threatening condition. However, in some cases it can be a symptom of another disorder that will need treatment. Seek prompt medical care if you have darkened skin and are also experiencing fatigue, loss of appetite, or sudden depression; if the darkened areas are also occurring in your mouth or other mucus membranes; or if you are experiencing diarrhea or constipation.
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replied June 3rd, 2011
What causes darkened skin?

Some of the most common forms of darkened skin are caused by sun damage, specifically from the ultraviolet rays of the sun. Darkening of the skin can also result from a hormonal change, a congenital or hormonal disorder, or a combination of sun exposure and allergic reaction (usually to a specific plant or chemical).

Genetic causes of darkened skin
Darkened skin may be caused by congenital or genetic conditions including:

•Neurofibromatosis (café au lait macules, which are light or dark brown patches of skin present from birth)

•Xeroderma pigmentosum (a genetic disorder of DNA repair)
Hormonal causes of darkened skin
Darkened skin can also be caused by hormonal changes in the body including:

•Addison’s disease (deceased production of hormones by the adrenal glands)

•Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid)

•Pregnancy

•Oral contraceptives
Environmental causes of darkened skin
Darkened skin can also be caused by exposure to external factors in the environment including:

Sunlight

Toxic chemicals

Other causes of darkened skin
Other causes of darkened skin include:

•Diabetic dermopathy (light brown, scaly patches due to diabetes-related changes in blood vessels)

• Freckles
Serious or life-threatening causes of darkened skin
In some cases, darkened skin may be a symptom of a serious or life-threatening condition that should be immediately evaluated in an emergency setting. These include:

•Addison’s disease (deceased production of hormones by the adrenal glands)

•Hemochromatosis (a disorder characterized by excess iron in the body)
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replied June 25th, 2011
pinpoint (small) brown spots on hands
Overview
There are several causes for brown spots on your hands, not all of which have to do with a vitamin deficiency. Brown spots may be due to a lack of vitamin C or B12, anemia, weak liver function or cumulative sun damage. It's important to investigate each potential cause; your doctor can help. If your brown spots are indeed caused by a lack of essential nutrients, add a vitamin supplement to your daily routine, and increase the amount of fruits and veggies you eat---prime natural sources for a host of all-important vitamins and minerals.

Lack of Vitamin C
You might remember scurvy as a disease that primarily affected Renaissance-era sailors confined to a ship for months at a time. Although it's rare now, scurvy does still appear in malnourished adults. It occurs when people don't ingest enough vitamin C, a vitamin the human body isn't capable of synthesizing on its own. Scurvy symptoms include bleeding gums and small, dark spots on the skin. The hair that grows out of these patches is curvy and shaped like a corkscrew.

Lack of Vitamin B12
According to a 2008 joint study performed by India's Saveetha Medical College and Singapore General Hospital's Department of Family Medicine and Continuity Care, vitamin B12 deficiency can cause skin discoloration and lesions---without any other symptoms being present. Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause "cutaneous manifestations," including "hyperpigmentation"---an overdose of color in the skin, like that of a lesion or brown spot. When these manifestations occur on the hands and feet, this study says vitamin B12 deficiency should be investigated as a cause.

Fanconi Anemia
This type of anemia is genetically inherited---it's not the type of anemia that occurs when your body runs short of iron. In this case, the body can't produce enough red blood cells, white blood cells or platelets. A primary symptom of the disease is brown spots on the skin.

Weak Liver Function
Your liver is responsible for absorbing nutrients from the food you eat, as well as ridding your body of toxins. You may have heard discolored patches of skin referred to as "liver spots"---this can be an accurate description in some cases. The liver helps filter your blood, removing harmful chemicals that contain free radicals, elements that cause skin damage on a cellular level. If your liver isn't doing its job, several external signs revolve around your skin: rashes, itchy skin and brown spots.

Sun Damage
Flat brown spots, or lentigines, may be the result of sun damage that occurred earlier in your life. They're most often seen on the face and hands, appearing during middle age. They can fade on their own if your skin is protected from the sun with clothing and sunscreen, or you can have them treated with lasers or peels. You'll have to watch these spots carefully to make sure they don't change in color or shape; if they do, they could be a form of skin cancer and should be inspected by a doctor immediately.

References
University of Maryland Medical Center: Scurvy
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replied June 25th, 2011
Overview
There are several causes for brown spots on your hands, not all of which have to do with a vitamin deficiency. Brown spots may be due to a lack of vitamin C or B12, anemia, weak liver function or cumulative sun damage. It's important to investigate each potential cause; your doctor can help. If your brown spots are indeed caused by a lack of essential nutrients, add a vitamin supplement to your daily routine, and increase the amount of fruits and veggies you eat---prime natural sources for a host of all-important vitamins and minerals.

Lack of Vitamin C
You might remember scurvy as a disease that primarily affected Renaissance-era sailors confined to a ship for months at a time. Although it's rare now, scurvy does still appear in malnourished adults. It occurs when people don't ingest enough vitamin C, a vitamin the human body isn't capable of synthesizing on its own. Scurvy symptoms include bleeding gums and small, dark spots on the skin. The hair that grows out of these patches is curvy and shaped like a corkscrew.

Lack of Vitamin B12
According to a 2008 joint study performed by India's Saveetha Medical College and Singapore General Hospital's Department of Family Medicine and Continuity Care, vitamin B12 deficiency can cause skin discoloration and lesions---without any other symptoms being present. Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause "cutaneous manifestations," including "hyperpigmentation"---an overdose of color in the skin, like that of a lesion or brown spot. When these manifestations occur on the hands and feet, this study says vitamin B12 deficiency should be investigated as a cause.

Fanconi Anemia
This type of anemia is genetically inherited---it's not the type of anemia that occurs when your body runs short of iron. In this case, the body can't produce enough red blood cells, white blood cells or platelets. A primary symptom of the disease is brown spots on the skin.

Weak Liver Function
Your liver is responsible for absorbing nutrients from the food you eat, as well as ridding your body of toxins. You may have heard discolored patches of skin referred to as "liver spots"---this can be an accurate description in some cases. The liver helps filter your blood, removing harmful chemicals that contain free radicals, elements that cause skin damage on a cellular level. If your liver isn't doing its job, several external signs revolve around your skin: rashes, itchy skin and brown spots.

Sun Damage
Flat brown spots, or lentigines, may be the result of sun damage that occurred earlier in your life. They're most often seen on the face and hands, appearing during middle age. They can fade on their own if your skin is protected from the sun with clothing and sunscreen, or you can have them treated with lasers or peels. You'll have to watch these spots carefully to make sure they don't change in color or shape; if they do, they could be a form of skin cancer and should be inspected by a doctor immediately.

References
University of Maryland Medical Center: Scurvy
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replied July 7th, 2011
BROWN SPOTS COULD BE A FUNGAL INFECTION PEOPLE. Tinea Versicolor
I had brown freckle type spots appear on my chest and asked a doctor (informally) and they said it looked like a fungal infection so to get antifungal cream over the counter. My spots had been there for a while, they don't itch, they appear a bit dry, but other than that, no pain or anything. Just was worried it was because of my smoking. Thought everyone might like to know that a fungal infection could be the culprit.
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