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Chickenpox And Pregnancy

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Could you tell me my 4 year old has just got chickenpox and I am 4 months pregnant should I be worried!!
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replied April 6th, 2006
Have you had chicken px before, if so you could get the adult form of it called shingles. I am not sure if its harmful to the baby
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replied April 6th, 2006
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meganm wrote:
have you had chicken px before, if so you could get the adult form of it called shingles. I am not sure if its harmful to the baby


i thought that if you had chicken pox before that you couldn't get it again...
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replied April 6th, 2006
I was told that u can get it again as an adult but it was much worse if u had it as a child. Im not 100% sure though
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replied April 6th, 2006
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I don't know if I believe that... I had chicken pox when I was four and I have baby sat all of my nieces and nephews when they had the chicken pox and I didn't get it again. But then again, maybe I was just lucky. Who knows? I'll google it for you....Brb....Okay, this is from babycenter.

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is it risky to be exposed to chicken pox during pregnancy?

It depends. If you've had chicken pox before, you're probably immune, so there's no need to worry. Up to 95 percent of adults in the united states are immune, including many people who had chicken pox and never even knew it. If you got the chicken pox vaccine (available in the united states since 1995), you're probably immune — it works for more than 80 percent of those who get it.

If you're not sure whether you're immune, a simple blood test can give you the answer. If you're not immune and you do happen to catch chicken pox while you're pregnant, there's a chance that it will affect your baby and that you could get quite sick.
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and this...

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what can happen to my baby if I get chicken pox while i'm pregnant?

Chances are good that no harm will come to your baby, but timing is a factor. If you get chicken pox during the first half of pregnancy, there's a slight risk that your baby will get something called congenital varicella syndrome. This condition is characterized by birth defects, including skin scarring, malformed limbs, an abnormally small head, vision or hearing problems, and motor or mental developmental disabilities. A baby with congenital varicella syndrome may also suffer poor growth in utero.

If you do contract chicken pox, you'll have a detailed ultrasound at 18 to 20 weeks to look for signs of defects or other problems and at least one follow-up sonogram later to see how your baby is doing. You may also choose to meet with a genetic counselor to discuss the risks in your particular case and decide how you want to proceed.

If you get chicken pox in the second half of pregnancy but more than five days before giving birth, your baby will probably be fine. Here's why: about five days after coming down with chicken pox, your body develops antibodies to the virus and passes them to your baby through the placenta, offering protection that his own immature immune system can't provide.

If you develop chicken pox five to 21 days before your baby is born, he might develop chicken pox days after birth, but because of the antibodies he received from you, it's much less likely to be serious. (some babies exposed to chicken pox in utero, particularly those exposed five to 21 days before birth, develop a case of shingles during infancy or early childhood without having had chicken pox after birth, but it's usually not serious.)

the most risky time to come down with chicken pox is between five days before giving birth and two days after delivery, because then your baby is exposed to the virus but doesn't have had time to receive antibodies from you before birth. In this case, he has a 30 to 40 percent chance of developing what's called neonatal varicella, or newborn chicken pox, which can be serious and even life threatening, especially if left untreated.

Fortunately, your baby's risk of a severe case can be greatly reduced if he gets a shot of varicella zoster immune globulin (vzig), a blood product that contains chicken pox antibodies. He'll be given the shot soon after birth if your chicken pox showed up within five days of delivery or as soon as you discover your rash if it's within two days after delivery.

If your baby shows any sign of developing the infection — such as coming down with a fever or showing a rash of even a few spots — he'll be treated intravenously with the antiviral drug acyclovir.

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hope that helps.
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replied April 7th, 2006
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sandralynn wrote:
depending on how severe you got it when you were a child, is what determines if you get it as an adult. When I got it, I only had maybe like, 10 spots on my body. I havent been around anyone with it since then, so I dunno if i'll get it again. (i hope not.. It sucks..)


i never heard that before. If that's truly the case then why do people get vaccines? Vaccines supposedly work by introducing a severely weakened form of the actual disease into your body so you can produce antibodies for it and thereby become immune. So if what you say is true, what is the point of getting a vaccine then? Not being argumentative, just genuinely trying to make sense of what you're saying.
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replied April 7th, 2006
Active User, very eHealthy
I don't think you can get it again once you've had it. And I don't think shingles is connected to chicken pox. My grandmother had shingles several years ago, and she had not been near anyone with chicken pox... And she'd had them when she was a child.

I'm not saying I know anything for sure, but i've always been told it's a one-time deal... That's why moms and dads will often (as was the case with me and my brother) make sure all children get chicken pox if one of them gets it.

My bf just said it's possible to get it again but that there's a very, very slim chance, as you are usually immune once you get it the first time.
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replied April 8th, 2006
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If you have had chicken pox the chances are you won't get it again but.....I have had chicken pox twice and shingles once!!!

My doctor says that my body obviously didn't make enough immunity the first time. Lucky me eh!!!! Lol
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replied April 8th, 2006
Active User, very eHealthy
I've heard that you can get the chicken pox twice, it's rare but possible.
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replied April 8th, 2006
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My moms friend was pregnant, and her step daughter got the chicken pox and they went to a drs appointment and the baby had died, and the doctor told her it was because her step daughter had chicken pox and it somehow killed the baby. I don't know the details, but I guess it can harm the baby.
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replied April 9th, 2006
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It is yes, u need see doctor!!!! Jus incase. Im sure it is risky. I mean if u have had it before u might be okay, but I have had it twice.
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replied April 9th, 2006
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Well when my gramma was pregnant with my mom one of my mom's brother's had the chicken pox and passed it onto my gramma. And my mom is fine. And she is now 48 and has never had the chicken pox even though she's been exposed to it many times.

As for getting it more than once, it can happen. My cousin got the chicken pox 4 or 5 times when she was a kid. I felt really bad for her.
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replied April 9th, 2006
Also most ob/gyn's do a blood test on preg women between 15 - 18 weeks to find out what you are immune to so you know what to avoid...Ie chicken pox, fifths disease, hepatitis a & b, mmr, etc. I would ask your ob and see if it has been done.
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