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Heel Pain While Working Out?

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If you suffer from heel pain while working out or cardio training, there is a very easy solution. Please post your symptoms on the site so I can review them and give you more information.

Pain is how your body is trying to tell you something is wrong! Listen to your body! I have alot of information on heel pain and physical activity.

You can find my research at: plantar fasciitis information

and

heel pain treatment
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replied January 23rd, 2004
Heel Pain Article
Here is an article with good information:

heel pain stopping you?

Many things can slow down your active lifestyle, but heel pain can definitely bring it to a stop. The most common form of heel pain in active people is known as plantar fasciitis (pronounced plan-tar fashee-eye-tiss). It occurs when the long, flat ligament on the bottom of the foot (plantar fascia) stretches irregularly and develops small tears that cause the ligament to become inflamed. The pain is described as being dull aching or sharp and can be reproduced by flexing the toes upwards (dorsiflexion) and tensing the fascia.

Although the fascia is invested with countless sturdy 'cables' of connective tissue called collagen fibers, it is certainly not immune to injury. In fact, about 5 to 10 per cent of all athletic injuries are inflammations of the fascia, an incidence rate that in the united states would produce about a million cases of plantar fasciitis per year, just among runners and joggers. Basketball players, tennis players, volleyballer’s, step-aerobics participants, and dancers are also prone to plantar problems, as are non-athletic people who spend a lot of time on their feet or suddenly become active after a long period of lethargy. A recent study found that over 50 per cent of people who suffer from plantar fasciitis are on their feet nearly all day.

Plantar fasciitis usually develops gradually. Heel pain may only occur when taking the first steps after getting out of bed or when taking the first steps after sitting for a long period of time. If the plantar fascia ligament is not rested, the inflammation and heel pain will get worse. Other conditions or aggravating factors, such as the repetitive stress of walking, standing, running, or jumping, will contribute to the inflammation and pain. In some cases, the inflamed ligament may not heal because many people who have plantar fasciitis do not completely stop the aggravating activity.

In athletes, a number of factors are associated with development of plantar fasciitis. These factors can lead the athlete to change his or her gait (the way the feet strike the ground), which can cause symptoms and injury. Risk factors for athletes include:

· biomechanical factors, such as decreased flexibility in the foot and ankle, imbalances in muscle strength (muscles in one leg or foot are weaker than the other), abnormal foot mechanics (when stepping down), and tightness in the achilles tendon.
· the repetitive nature of sports activities and improper training.
· rapidly increasing the number of miles run.
· running on steep hills.
· wearing shoes that are worn out.
· wearing shoes that do not have a cushioned sole or enough arch support.
· abruptly changing the intensity or duration of the running routine.

The traditional remedies for plantar fasciitis include stretching the calf, massaging, decreasing one's training, losing weight, purchasing better-fitting shoes (with a raised heel and arch support), icing the sore heel, and taking ibuprofen.

Another treatment option, also known as one of the easiest, is using heel seats in your shoes. Heel seats pick up and re-stretch the plantar fascia, redistribute the heels natural fat pad, provide structural reinforcement to the foot, and apply acupressure to relieve the pain while your feet heal. You can find such heel seats through your podiatrist or at www.Heel-that-pain.Com.

In any case, when you feel pain, your body is trying to warn you that something is wrong. See a doctor or specialist at the first sign of pain. Treating problems early is key to a healthy lifestyle.
Jason schultz – author of plantar-fasciitis.Org & treatment specialist at www.Heel-that-pain.Com
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replied January 23rd, 2004
Other Forms of Heel Pain.. (addition)
Other forms of heel pain:

bruised heels -
a bruised heel can occur when there is a tremendous amount of impact around the heel region of the foot. This can be associated with shoes that are worn out or shoes that offer very little protection to the bottom of the foot. The soft tissue around the heel gets bruised and inflamed. If you do not have a good heel cup for the foot to rest in, then the fat pad splays outwardly and reduces the amount of material directly underneath the heel bone. At that point, the foot has less shock absorbing capabilities.

Heel pump bumps -
heel pump bump is associated with the style of shoe that is referred to as high heel pumps. Heel pump bump just designates its location, stating that it is on back of the heel bone. It may exist either on the left or right side. The pump bump is generally to the outside of the achilles tendon. The bump generally starts out very small as soft tissue inflammation. As more friction and pressure continues in back of the heel bone, the soft tissue inflammation expands.

Achilles tendon pain -
pain can be created in this tendon in a number of different situations. One of the causes of achilles tendon pain can be associated with the foot pronating. As the foot pronates, collapses, and the heel bone begins to twist sideways, it stretches the achilles tendon, very much like a guitar string, and puts stress on the tendon. Pain can be created in this tendon in a number of different situations. One of the causes of achilles tendon pain can be associated with the foot pronating. As the foot pronates, collapses, and the heel bone begins to twist sideways, it stretches the achilles tendon, very much like a guitar string, and puts stress on the tendon.
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replied March 31st, 2004
Here Is Some More Info On Heel Spurs
It sounds like you might have a heel spur. I found this site and they offer some good advice on what causes heel pain and some stretches and exercises to help too. I think they even have a free guide.<p>

i hope it helps.
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replied June 12th, 2013
Heel spurs are really painful and it is the next disorder which come after plantar fasciitis. So avoid getting heel spur. Here is some information on Heel spurs, heel pain and plantar fasciits and their treatments
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replied June 29th, 2004
Plantar Fasciitis
Are night splints supposed to bring on heel pain and other foot/calf pain and cause numbness in the toes?
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replied July 2nd, 2004
Yes, night splints can bring the onset of other types of pain because they are physically stretching your foot (and everything inside). The numbness in your toes is coming from poor circulation, due to the night splint. Like the article above suggested, whether it be for heel spurs, or plantar fasciitis, the heel seat is your best bet.

Make sure you talk with your doctor also. He/she will bring an opinion based after looking at you, something we cannot do over the web.


Cheers
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replied July 2nd, 2004
Also.
Ps: night splints do work for some people, you just happen to be one of the many people that don't do well wearing one. If you can adjust to sleeping with a bulky brace on your foot through the night, have excellent circulation, and are somewhat flexible, then a night splint may work.

Cheers
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replied July 27th, 2004
Experienced User
I used to have my heel hurt also when doing cardio. The trick is your shoes. There is to much pressure and weight going on yu heel because your shoes dont give the proper suppert. You can buy arch supports that you can put in your shoes. This should evenly distribute the weight on your feet. If that doesnt work then see a docter
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replied February 2nd, 2007
Pump Bumps
I have been diagnosed with pump bumps, but the army said that there is nothing they can do for it, unless it calcifies. Than they can do go in and grind them down. I get the most pain after pt, during the day walking from place to place, and while driving, only the right foot.

Is there really nothing I can do for it?
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replied April 25th, 2010
Arch Pain
My arch on both feet hurt when doing cardio and/or workout videos. No pain while on treadmill or bike. I''ve purchased two different pairs of shoes-New Balance running shoe and a Nike cross trainer. I also purchased a crosstrainer insole but the pain is still there. Help?
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replied July 10th, 2011
heel spurs
Try the Sketchers Trainers with the rolled heel. It keeps you off the heel.
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replied March 14th, 2012
Inner Arch Pain - Help!!
I am experiencing some major inner arch pain on my right foot. Its particularly sore after wearing high heels and also after heavy personal training at the gym where im running or jogging. I seem to get away with it OK on a cross trainer, but when I take my shoes off and relax the pain really kicks in. It goes between an ache and a stab when I walk. If I flex my foot it really is sore, and arch my toes I feel it as well. Im putting some ice on it now to hopefully calm it down. I started exercising 6 days a week last July and have been doing so ever since, dropping 20kgs so far with another 25kg to go. Im guessing my heel doesnt like the training?
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replied July 23rd, 2012
I just started doing insanity and it's been 2 weeks n my inner heel/arch hurts more n more after I finish working out!!! What could it be??
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