Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Orthopedics Forum

Right Hip Scope Torn Labrum (Page 2)

Must Read
Think you might be experiencing bone loss? Check out this Intro to Osteoporosis and evaluate your risk for developing bone weakness. ...
Although bone mass loss is normal as we age, some people are more at risk of developing osteoporosis than others. Are you at risk? More here....
Do you have severe back pain? Do your bones break frequently or with little pressure? You might be experiencing osteoporosis. Found out more here....

March 12th, 2010
Labral Hip Tear
After 10 years of thinking I was developing athritis in my right hip, 2009 became a year that was overbearingly painful. I'm only 38 years old .The pain was caused mostly getting in and out of my car, walking for 5 minutes or longer, standing or sitting for a period of time and missionary position. In 2009 missionary position with my husband would put me in agony and I was in horrible pain for days. The pain was in my groin and lower back and I felt stiff when I would get up, from any position. One month of physical therapy and the therapist told me she thought I needed an MRI with a dye so that the doctor could see a Labral tear that she suspected. I have a labral tear and heading to the only doctor in Oregon that does the surgery. Just waiting for the next step. So glad the pain is a fixable problem. Looking back, this must have been a skiing injury that progressively got worse.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied April 10th, 2010
Here is an update, I spent 2 and a half hours with the surgeon who will be doing the arthoscopy on my right hip in 2 and a half weeks. She told me that the tear was caused by a section of my hip bone that is a sort of bump that caused the laberal tear. She will be shaving off that section of the bone so that it will no longer tear the labrum, and fix the tear. She told me half of the surgery is diagnostic, half is repair. This website has been helpful to me to understand things that I am, and may be facing. So I hope my blog helps another person. Not much more to say now, but I will in weeks to come.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied April 22nd, 2010
Post surgery
Wow! Ok, now I''m scared. I had a hip labrum repair three days ago. My surgeon told me I would be able to get up and walk out of the recovery room, would not need crutches, or physical therapy. Needless to say, I was in so much pain after the surgery, I demanded crutches. The male nurse acted like I was being a baby, I didn''t care.

I was doing pretty good, I think (with pain meds) until last night when I tried to get up out of bed and had a horrible searing pain down the outside of my thigh all the way down to my kneee. I screamed and stopped in my tracks. This morning I am having the same pain on a lesser scale, but the pain radiating down the top of my thigh and groin are back (preop pain that led to surgery). I have been able to walk carefully without crutches around my house and out in the yard some, but this morning it hurts. I haven''t called my doctor being that acording to him, by the third day I would be fine, not needing pain meds, and should be able to get back regular activities.

I don''t know what to do now and I am terrified I have re-injured something in there. I''m not worried that I re-tore anything because my surgeon said he "shaved out" the tear, it''s gone.

Any suggestions? Anyone had this happen and still recover fine?
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied June 16th, 2010
I have been to the surgeon to talk about the labrum repair and he also told me that I wouldn't need crutches to walk on and that after about 4 days I could go back to work. After reading all this I am wondering if that is even true. ranchfolks I hope you are doing alot better and your recovery has been easier.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 5th, 2010
R hip labral tear/scope/
First of all, in talking with my OS he said 3 years ago they weren't even doing many labral tear repairs in the hip so it looks like all of us are in the beginning stages of this. I am 48 and the mom of 4-been thru 2 csect and hystectomy.
I injured my labrum a little over a year ago stretching and thinking it was just a bad pull-got thru graduation 09 then rested, continued with pain thru the fall, and then tried PT during the first part of the year. Hindsight, I shouldn't have put this off and also should have had it checked before using most of my PT. Had the scope in the middle of child #4 graduation-oh well-wanted to be healed before snow and ice.
The artherogram showed debris in there but he couldn't quite tell if there was a tear. There was pain with almost any movement and esp. an impingement.
During the scope, he was able to clean out the debris, debride the area(which means shaving/trimming it), and he also shaved off some wear and tear on the front. However, the slight tear was very high and the anchor failed. This surgeon is one of the best in northern IN.
and was frustrated because the orthopedic rep in the surgery didn't have instruments with him that were long enough to reach it. I actually live in the orthopedic capital of the world too!(This surgeon is 30 min away though. So, I am now 6 weeks postop and still have the impingement. Because the tear wasn't repaired I was only on crutches for 10 days(7-8 inside the house). I am walking slow but increasing distance. Inclines cause pain as well as pushing off, extending the leg, etc. I am starting my PT on my own from what I had been doing prior to surgery but am back at the beginning. Long term-prob. will have to have it again. I am also looking at some exercises by Damian Griffith(just google his name) to incorporate.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 8th, 2010
Hip operation
hallo

If I have a hip operation in August will I be fully mobile in December to attend a wedding which involves flying about 8 hours? I am 69
Thank you
Maria
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 8th, 2010
Hello

I had right hip arthroscopy for a labrar tear 4 months ago and I'm still in pain.I'm going to another orthopedic doctor for a second opinion. I'm 40 years old and not in bad shape but I have pain sitting, standing on my feet for more than half hour climbing the stairs and is so frustating to deal with that every day. I heard that resurfacing might be another solution for us that not had relief from this but the doctor will decide if you are a candidate or not for this type of procedure. Good Luck to everybody with the recovery.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied September 12th, 2010
How do I walk after labral tear surgery? If with crutches, how
I just had orthoscopic surgery on my labral tear. I was sent home with a wonderful machine that is attached t o an ice belt. It is set to keep my hip cooled to 49 degrees for 30 minutes. Then I rest it for 30 then hit it again. It is WONDErFUL. I am to do this for 4 hours z day for ten days. I am not for sure how much walking I am to do? Do I use my crutches for two days or 10 days? Do I just try to walk? Does anyone know?
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied September 24th, 2010
hip labral tear
It took me 4 doctors and a chiropracter to finally get a diagnosis for my labral tear. I had actually decided that I would just live with the pain,which I have had for years. The pain over the past year got increasingly worse, to the point that I had trouble walking. I am a police officer and found that wearing the gun belt and sitting in a cruiser excessively aggravated the situation to the point that I did not feel I could effectively and safely perform my job.
The first few doctors did xrays and an MRI. Since they could not see much from either it was determined (pretty much assumed) that I was in the beginning stages of degenerative arthritis and my only option was a hip replacement. ( I tried the injections, no relief ) I am 40 years old and had a difficult time believing that there was nothing else that could be done and that this "arthritis" attacked me so quickly and severely. I searched the internet under "hip pain misdiagnosis" and found the labral tear. It fit my symptoms and I became hopeful again, since there was some treatment for a tear. I made an appointment with a new doctor and took my copy of my recent xrays and mri. My disappointment when he told me the "arthritis" theory again brought unexpected tears to my eyes. I told him all of the above and how let down I was that he gave the same opinion. It was then that he offered me an appointment with his partner who specialized in arthroscopic surgery, he told me that he wasnt hopeful that he could help me but that I could make and appointment for his opinion. I think he offered it because he was feeling sorry for me in my emotional state. As discouraged as I was I made the appointment. I returned , armed with information about labral tears and met with the specialist. I am so glad I did. He reviewed my (the same ones) MRI and xrays and IMMEDIATELY was able to see what all the others could not. He pointed out what he believed to be a labral tear. I never even had to show him or tell him about my own labral tear self-diagnosis. He showed me photographs of a surgery he had done on a man the day prior , before and after. I scheduled the surgery and had it done on September 14. I am still off work recovering. I am still having discomfort from the surgery and start pt in a couple days. I was told to stay on crutches for 5-6 weeks and that I would not be able to return to full duty for 5-6 months. I can go back restricted duty sooner. It is too soon for me to know if the surgery is a success, but from looking at MY pictures he shaved, removed, repaired alot. I had the option of a hip replacement, but because I am 40 he recommended I do the scope. I think I will be glad I did. I hate being stationary, but for the long run I think I will be glad I did it. Have too many adventures waiting.....we are very active with hunting, hiking, dirtbiking, climbing, and on and on.....couldnt imagine not even being able to walk for more than short periods of time. Keeping my fingers crossed.

Are there any other officers reading this that believe the gun belt is a contributing factor to this injury? Or have any information or resources? Thanks... and good luck to everyone considering the surgery..
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied April 10th, 2011
Hi i am also a police officer, 15years now. In wearing the rig, i have always had pain on the hip. don't know how i got the labral tear...I have felt it coming on for a while now. everytime i made a sudden turn to the right, i got a pain that would almost make me drop. Over the past couple months now, the pain has gotten worse. Lower back pain is unbelievable!! Went to orthopedic, when my back and hip (groin) area too, didnt get any better. He did an xray, whick showed alot of arthritis in my lower back. I am only 46 years old. When explaining my other pain, hip/groin area, he immediately said it sounds like a labral tear. He sent me for an MRI, and sure enough, not even 24 hours later, he called and said cyst/labral tear on right side. Now i have an orthopedic surgeon appt. tomorrow 4-11-11 to see what can be done. Just worried about the down time if surgery is recommended. That is alot of sick time that would have to be used. Your question about the gun belt is interesting, I am definitely gonna ask the surgeon about that. I never even thought that could be the cause. I just know, I do not want to live with this pain, hopefully i will get relief soon.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 13th, 2010
Hip scoping NOT for me. REGRET!!!
I am 32 yrs old and just had surgery on Sept 12th for a labral tear, arthritis cleaned out, bone spurs shaved down. I found out before the surgery that my bones have also deteriorated. What I didn't realize was that they have to remove a cap from your hip in order to get inside and do the work they need to do. So for any normal patient they will become slightly unstable after surgery but will adjust to the cap being removed. How ever, I went into surgery unstable before the cap was removed because my bones are deteriorated. So the down side to my surgery is that I have NOT adjusted to the removal of the cap so my hip literally dislocates 1-5 times a day. The pain is horrific. I am supposed to have the same surgery on my other hip. NOT A CHANCE!!!! Had I know this would make me this unstable I never would have had the procedure done. I was a waitress/bartender so I thought it would improve my quality of life. Boy was I wrong! All I have to do is move wrong. I can be sitting, standing, or even lying down. It is awful. Just be aware of everything before you decide to do the procedure. My doc didn't give me any warning of the side affects. Good luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied October 2nd, 2013
Remove what?
I need a medical term please

Ty
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 19th, 2010
Hi, I'm Natalie. I'm 15 years old. I found out about 5 weeks ago that my left labrum in my hip was completely torn off after undergoing 3 MRI's. I was sentenced to 6 weeks on crutches. It's been 5 and 1/2 weeks and now I'm finally getting surgery so my bones do not rub together as well as getting a cyst drained that had formed. I dance 5 hours a day and dancing was my only way to college. Please tell me I'll be able to dance again? Good luck with your hip and I hope you fell better. Hang in there Smile
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 19th, 2010
Hi, I'm Natalie. I'm 15 years old. I found out about 5 weeks ago that my left labrum in my hip was completely torn off after undergoing 3 MRI's. I was sentenced to 6 weeks on crutches. It's been 5 and 1/2 weeks and now I'm finally getting surgery so my bones do not rub together as well as getting a cyst drained that had formed. I dance 5 hours a day and dancing was my only way to college. Please tell me I'll be able to dance again? Good luck with your hip and I hope you fell better. Hang in there Smile
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied November 20th, 2010
In June I slipped on water and fell at a store. I had pain but had been recovering from another illness that was life threatening at the time. When the pain continued for as much as 1-2 months after my family doctor sent me to PT. I went to 3 wks of PT and did not get much in the way of results so they sent me back to the doctor who then refered me to orthepedic. The first orthopedic sent me for a scan that showed I had cyst on my overies. So I had to have and ultra sound on that the cyst had burst by the time I had gotten it done. Then was sent for an MRI. The result was a degeneration of hip and possible labrum tear. I was told by him that the pain I was having in my groin area had to be something else and I should see a OBGYN. I called my family doctor who said I should go the pain managment route while I waited I could get a second opinion. The 2nd ortho doc said I should see one that specializes with the hip scope. So I went he had me do the injection it was so painful the first 3 days then got a lot of relief but was short term. I then had a MRI with dye that confirmed a tear. I had a lot of pain with the MRI dye injection for the first 3-4 days. Is that normal? I saw the surgoen today and he told me that I have a lot more pain then he would suspect for just a tear. 97% is in my groin area and trying to open my legs hurts the worst. This has killed my sex life. He also told me today that he think we may to do surgery but wants to hold of for 4 weeks to see if there is any improvment. Anyone have advise?
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied April 6th, 2011
wow it seems that many have gone through multiple doctors just to get a dignostic. im a 24 year old male i always kept myself in good shape watch what i ate took vitamins and minerals supplements. i had felt a locking of the joint [ left hip ] for about the last 2-3 years. if i was pushing myself at the gym the pain slowly crept up on me. i would immediately discontinue, slowly strecth and beging at a calmer pace. note; if your doing any type of activity and its causing a slight pain dont tough it out. listen to your body for these are warnings signs. during this time i discovered that glucosamine and chondroitin make a big impact on releaving the pain. but this alone was not enough to remidiate the pain when i started my brazilian jiu jitsu classes. this type of martial arts really test the hip motion. the pain was to the point were i could not even lift my leg 2 inch high from a sitting position in my car. got x rays done everything looked fine. then got an MRI with contrast which i kid you not felt as if my hip was about to explode from so much pressure. but the torn labrum appeared on the charts. took my time picking a doctor he studied the chart told me i had a slight bumb on the head femor which is causing the labrum to tear. after explaining the pros and cons he then said this which i would never forget [ son theres no rush for this think this through carefully ] i then went home studied everything about this surgery. look at the pt workouts everything. month in halve later decided to do the surgery. i have already learned that it will not heal on its own and will in fact continue to worsen with having such an active lifestyle. doctor trimed the dangled labrum and slightly shaved the bump off from the head femur. 2 incisions. now this doctor is big on doing things at a slow pace so i was on crutches for about 3 weeks, off from work for about 4 months. during that time rented a hip flexion machine[ recommendations of the doctor] that would give me motion to the hip before i was able to go to physical therapy bike and swimming highly recommended. physical therapy was great. have a desire to improve and always ask what else can you do i notice they rather work with someone who is positive. surgery was on november 9 im back running swimming cycling at full stregnth and doing bjj workouts but no sparring. doctor doesnt recommend full contact sport just yet advises to let it completely heal. theres still a slight pain but no where near to before the surgery. yoga and stretching helps with the flexibility and also reduces the pain to which theres no pain. hope this was helpful doctor had plenty of experience in arthoscopic surgery of the hip.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 3rd, 2011
Finally got the answer to the issue. I self-diagnosed and told the PT I thought it was a torn labrum 2 years ago and he just ignored me. In hindsight - what he was doing wouldn't have helped anyways. I'm a contemporary dancer and I've been pretty miserable not being able to dance as much as I'd like for two years. Called up my Dr.'s office and got a referral for an orthapaedist who took X-rays, said things looked fine, and I had to twist his arm to order an MRI. Sure enough, torn superior labrum and he said their is something structurally with my hips that made pinching natural (I guess the X-ray didn't show that.) I asked if not having the labrum repaired would lead to arthritis and he was extremely rude and told me - you are going to get it anyways. I had a lot of questions I didn't get answers to because his rudeness caused me to freeze up. I still need to gather more information from doctors. Have an appointment scheduled for when I'm in New York with someone whose area of research is in the area of dancers with torn labrums. I'll have to pay out of pocket - but I don't care. Good information is worth everything. My GP is supportive of this . . . he is going to research and see if under some special code this can be covered. I've read almost every free article I could find on the internet about torn labrums - from scientific studies to exercises that are supposed to help and have begun my own regime. I am getting relief from my new approach to wellness. The approach has largely been intuitive. A really valuable tool has been videotaping myself in basic positions, standing, then walking, basic plies, forward folds, down dogs and watching them exercise by exercise. I wear as little as possible so I can see the bones. I videotape from the back, the side, and the front. After I do one side I watch it and try and figure out what is causing the misalignment - boy was my body ever screwed up - things are shifting though! I've also begun some work in a pool. I began with simply walking and trying to walk with good alignment. I was shocked at how weak one side is. I'm taking a new approach to stretching. I used to stretch both sides equally, but then I'd open up equally. My right hip externally rotated around 15 degrees less than my right and my left hip internally rotated around 15 degrees less. I just work on the externally rotation of my right hip and internal rotation of my left. It is working! My flexibility is becoming more even. Before the torn labrum diagnosis I also researched trigger points and began myofascial release with foam rollers - this is really helping my body open up. When I'm in the studio rehearsing if ANYTHING hurts, I stop. If the muscles feel tired, I stop. I am hoping to get information about what sort of things would tend to aggravate it so I know what type of movement to avoid, or eliminate if needed. I've stopped taking the stairs at work. When I walk to and from my care I focus on walking with good alignment. For the pain I've found what works is a combination of ice, heat, ice, heat - 10 minutes each. I don't use anti-inflamatories when I exercise because I don't want to mask the pain - helps indicate what you SHOULDN'T BE DOING. At night I've stacked up pillows so that my shins lay on top of them. This helps with the alignment of the pelvis. When I lie on my side I lie with the pillows between my shins. Reading a good book right now called "Heal your Hips" that has some great aquatherapy exercises in it. Most of all - trying to remain hopeful. Torn labrums don't heal themselves (I think there is a chance if where your tear is there is some vascularizaton and I do believe in miracles) and if I find out that dancing will risk further injury I'll have to work on acceptance and find different ways to express myself. I haven't found the studies, but have heard buzz on boards that often those with arthoscopic surgery end up with hip replacements, sort of buys time. The doc. in New York I'm sure will have good information re: if he thinks surgery would be advisable. My guess is no - not at 52 years of age. Depressing...really depressing. If anyone else has ideas on managing a torn labrum with conservative treatment - bring it on! I too would like to know the name of the person who has done a ton of these type of surgerys.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 3rd, 2011
Superior Labral Tear - anyone have this type?
Wondering if anyone else has/had a superior torn labrum. I've recently discovered that this has been the cause of 2 1/2 years of on and off pain (1st time I couldn't move for 2 months!) I self-diagnosed and told the PT I thought it was a torn labrum 2 years ago and he just ignored me. In hindsight - what he was doing wouldn't have helped anyways. I'm a contemporary dancer and I've been pretty miserable not being able to dance as much as I'd like for two years. Called up my Dr.'s office and got a referral for an orthapaedist who took X-rays, said things looked fine, and I had to twist his arm to order an MRI. Sure enough, torn superior labrum and he said their is something structurally with my hips that made pinching natural (I guess the X-ray didn't show that.) I asked if not having the labrum repaired would lead to arthritis and he was extremely rude and told me - you are going to get it anyways. I had a lot of questions I didn't get answers to because his rudeness caused me to freeze up. I still need to gather more information from doctors. Have an appointment scheduled for when I'm in New York with someone whose area of research is in the area of dancers with torn labrums. I'll have to pay out of pocket - but I don't care. Good information is worth everything. My GP is supportive of this . . . he is going to research and see if under some special code this can be covered. I've read almost every free article I could find on the internet about torn labrums - from scientific studies to exercises that are supposed to help and have begun my own regime. I am getting relief from my new approach to wellness. The approach has largely been intuitive. A really valuable tool has been videotaping myself in basic positions, standing, then walking, basic plies, forward folds, down dogs and watching them exercise by exercise. I wear as little as possible so I can see the bones. I videotape from the back, the side, and the front. After I do one side I watch it and try and figure out what is causing the misalignment - boy was my body ever screwed up - things are shifting though! I've also begun some work in a pool. I began with simply walking and trying to walk with good alignment. I was shocked at how weak one side is. I'm taking a new approach to stretching. I used to stretch both sides equally, but then I'd open up equally. My right hip externally rotated around 15 degrees less than my right and my left hip internally rotated around 15 degrees less. I just work on the externally rotation of my right hip and internal rotation of my left. It is working! My flexibility is becoming more even. Before the torn labrum diagnosis I also researched trigger points and began myofascial release with foam rollers - this is really helping my body open up. When I'm in the studio rehearsing if ANYTHING hurts, I stop. If the muscles feel tired, I stop. I am hoping to get information about what sort of things would tend to aggravate it so I know what type of movement to avoid, or eliminate if needed. I've stopped taking the stairs at work. When I walk to and from my care I focus on walking with good alignment. For the pain I've found what works is a combination of ice, heat, ice, heat - 10 minutes each. I don't use anti-inflamatories when I exercise because I don't want to mask the pain - helps indicate what you SHOULDN'T BE DOING. At night I've stacked up pillows so that my shins lay on top of them. This helps with the alignment of the pelvis. When I lie on my side I lie with the pillows between my shins. Reading a good book right now called "Heal your Hips" that has some great aquatherapy exercises in it. Most of all - trying to remain hopeful. Torn labrums don't heal themselves (I think there is a chance if where your tear is there is some vascularizaton and I do believe in miracles) and if I find out that dancing will risk further injury I'll have to work on acceptance and find different ways to express myself. I haven't found the studies, but have heard buzz on boards that often those with arthoscopic surgery end up with hip replacements, sort of buys time. The doc. in New York I'm sure will have good information re: if he thinks surgery would be advisable. My guess is no - not at 52 years of age. Depressing...really depressing. If anyone else has ideas on managing a torn labrum with conservative treatment - bring it on! I too would like to know the name of the person who has done a ton of these type of surgerys.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied October 3rd, 2011
Especially eHealthy
sunhope,

You may have femoral-acetabular impingement (FAI), which has caused your labral tear. FAI has not been a diagnosis for very long (less than 10 years). So, young orthopedic surgeons and those with an interest in hip surgery should know about it. However, many established surgeon may not be that familiar with it, nor know how to pick it up on hip x-rays. If you don't know about something, you won't be looking for it.

A lot of the early research on the topic was done in the military. Many of the young recruits were having hip pain, not responding to the usual treatments. The military orthopedic surgeon got tired of just attributing this to groin muscle pulls or stress reactions/fractures in the hip and pelvis. A lot of these young soldier were medical boarded from the military, with "hip pain". So, the surgeons went looking for a reason.

It was finally noted that a lot of these recruits had the same looking deformity on x-ray. Hip arthroscopy was still in its infancy. But, over the past decade or so, hip 'scopes have become much more common.

If the impinging structures can be shaved off and the labrum debrided, the patient usually has at least some pain relief (if they don't already have degenerative changed within the joint). The labrum is like the meniscus in the knee, it cannot heal itself, it is cartilage, and thus, avascular. But, the torn part can be debrided or smooth out.

But, again, if the articular cartilage within the hip joint has already started to degenerate (osteoarthritis), then the 'scope debridement may not help much. So, usually, before the surgeon enters into a big surgery, he/she will look at the MRI to see how the cartilage in the joint is doing. If the cartilage is sound, then it does not matter what age you are, you may benefit from a debridement of the labral tear.


So, you may want to ask the surgeon you are going to see, what caused the tear? Is it from an FAI or is just degenerative in nature? Any hip surgeon worth his/her salt should know about FAI.

Good luck. Hope you get back to the activities that you wish to do.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied February 3rd, 2012
Repeat labral tear after arthroscopy
I had labral repair Nov. 2010 after struggling with hip pain, multiple steroid injections, 1 year of physical therapy, and misdiagnoses for almost 7 years. Prior to the surgery I could barely walk 200 feet before my chronic pain of a 4 out of 10 went up to a 6 out of 10. After a full day on my feet I would be bedbound for 2 days just recovering. I was on disability for 6 months after the surgery because it took that long for me to recover (And thus ate up all my savings). I maintained a light activity (pretty much walking only, no exercise/running, etc...). Finally I had complete pain relief- I felt like a totally new person. However, the pain relief only lasted 3 months before it came back. Exactly one year after my surgery, I get diagnosed again with a new labral tear in the same hip. Doctor and myself don't know how it could have been torn as I am not involved in sports, don't exercise, and had no traumatic injuries within the year. Now contemplating should I have the surgery again... any advise? Also my husband and I are talking about having kids one day, wondering if its really even an option for me? I am only 26 years old, any advise would be helpful.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied February 3rd, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Shayla,

Acetabular labral tears are often associated with femoral acetabular impingement (FAI). FAI and labral tears in the hip have really not been known about in the mainstream of orthopedic surgery for very many years. It may have been being studied in the military and some hip centers, maybe 7 to 10 years ago, but most of the procedures, like the hip scope really come into common usage until the last 3 to 5 years.

So, this is still sort of unknown territory, in terms of long term results.


However, back to FAI. There are a couple of different types, which can act as a cam or a pincher, causing the labrum to tear.

It takes an orthopedic surgeon who is trained in measuring out the acetabulum and femoral neck, to determine if FAI exists. It can be done on plain x-rays of the hip.

But, if you do have a cam or a pincher effect, then just doing the 'scope will not take care of the problem. The femoral neck also has to be taken care of, or the labrum will just keep tearing, until it is completely torn up.


You might inquire as to whether or not you have FAI.

Good luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?
<< 12
Tags: hip
Quick Reply