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Life Expectancy After Triple Bypass? (Page 3)

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July 18th, 2010
i feel for u all
hi everyone i feel for you all i know what everyone is going through i am 41 and have 7 stents 9 heartattacks and 2 months ago i had to have triple bypass . i know how it makes u feel sometimes i feel i ont make it to be 43 but i just do what i can and take it day by day and try to deal with what comes up oh also 3 weeks ago i had another mild heart attack again life can be so cruel at times just keep your chin up its got to get better soon
tim
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replied July 20th, 2010
There are companies out there that provide life expectancy calculations based on your specific health history. You could send all your medical records to these companies and they in turn would give you a detailed life expectancy report....Fasano, AVS, and 21st Services are the big three life expectancy companies.
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replied August 14th, 2010
I know how you feel! I had a tripple by oass in December 2000, after six months I went back on duty for the Sheriff's Office working patrol in the streets I did this for eight more years and the Cardiologists said no more cops and robbers. Boy do I miss the lights and sirens now more then ever.
I take each day as it comes and visit our kids and grandkids all over the country. We fly to and from the east coast and sometimes drive. My best friend my wife is always at my side, play the cards you were dealt make peace with youself and your maker. and enjoy life each day..... Good luck Rich
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replied August 19th, 2010
I had quadruple bypass at 49 and am 54 now - no idea how long I will live and don't really care - I have 4 more years than I would have, had i not had the surgery, since surgery i have my first grandson and a second on the way; the best thing that ever happened to me - so i consider myself lucky, every day is borrowed so make the most of it! As to the sex thing; let's face it, if you are a male you are always wanting more and a women is always looking for a reason to have less; unless of course you are one of the few who don't fit the mold and get all you want - oops, not quite so lucky - you have heart disease, guess we can't have everything.
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replied August 19th, 2010
Last word was censored - rhymes with "itching".
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replied August 20th, 2010
Heart bypass, diabetes & anxiety
Sorry Deb, I don't have a reply. I am just in the same boat as you and came looking for an answer and came upon your question. Did you ever receive an answer?
My husband had quadruple bypass less than 6 months ago and is having the same feelings as your husband, so I believe for the most part that they are common. He also has dreams of being visited by dead friends/relatives every night. As you may imagine this makes me nervous. My husband also has type 2 diabetes, insulin dependent and 53 years of age.
I don't honestly think anyone will ever answer the original question, not even the doctors, because no one can ever say how long anyone will live, that and no one will, unless confronted, give an educated guess for fear of causing unnecessary stress and anxiety to the patient. We just need to keep optimistic.
Most importantly, how is your husband now?
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replied September 11th, 2010
I had triple bypass very sucessful!
Well if the unhappy people are still reading I had the opposite. I knew I had a problem, was ignored, but I was teaching at the time and we are of tough stuff. Plus I am an Irishman (woman) I had my triple bypass 9 years ago at the age of 59. Never was concerned about the surgery( had great doctors); was home in 5 days and on the way home stopped, with my sister, at a drugstore. I came home only with pain medication and felt fine. I couldn't go back to work as soon as I would have liked because of my job. Needed to wait till I coud take a direct hit as can happen when you are short and weigh about 100lbs. My biggest complaint was the one area from which they took and artery and never thought to ask for refill on pain med. When I went back to surgeon and told him my only complaint he immediately renewed Rx for pain and that did it. No depresssion and no other meds. Went back full time and really have never thought much about it. I also am alone but hey I have been since I left home, no big deal. Could worry be causing some of the problems? I only ask because maybe I was dumb and didn't know those things could happen. I am now retired and enjoying not having to get up so early; I may wake up early but now I don't care. I am enjoying life and I have a lot of stress, but don't we all? Please try to take a positive approach and realize that the surgery was the cure. My only perstonn to whom I could relate was David Letterman and he had a great outlook and I thought that was how it was and thinking must have made it so. Have a GREAT cardiologist with a good sense of humor. We argue for fun and depending on the point is how he wins and I do also. See him 2x a year and that is all. So hang in there and watch Judge Judy, she makes me laugh and that is a good thing.
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replied December 7th, 2010
Please watch online videos of Dr. Esselstyn. May save your life
Seriously consider a plant based diet based on Dr Esselstyn, Dr Fuhrmann, or Dr Orinsh. Google them, watch the videos, and do it. Heart disease can be repaired in time, but you need to do it yourself. I am 56, my dad is 80 and almost died this summer from heart disease. He is in process of cleaning his arteries with this diet and he feels better than he has in years. I changed my diet to it too. No meat, little or no oil, reduced sugars, no dairy. Hey, the food cravings go away, and I have lost 29 pounds, feel great. Try it, not easy the first week is the hardest, but it can be done if you want to do it. Doctors have no training in this and can not help you. they are trained to dish out pills for symptoms that is it. you need to do this on your own. Good luck, D.
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replied January 20th, 2011
Triple bypass 12 years ago
I had a triple bypass on halloween 1998. I had several blackouts in the prior 8 years and all the testing that was done apparently indicated no heart problem until the final blackout which got me an ambulance ride to the hospital and after a week of various tests finally an angiogram. Within minutes the doctors said do we do it tonight or tomorrow? No choice, no alternative, they said so I agreed and it was done. Triple Bypass. I will be 79 within the month and passed my 12th operation anniversary last Halloween. I adjusted my lifestyle and found the right food combinations and whole food concentrates. Took a strong interest in knowing as much as my doctors and found that I often am ahead of them in checking the research.Never a smoker. No statins, baby aspirin once a day, ace inhibitor(small dose) omega 3 capsule, CoQ10, and most important, fruit and veggie concentrates. I expect to continue my active life for a long time and I do recommend and represent the good stuff that keeps me going. Bob M.
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replied February 23rd, 2011
I am a divorced, 58.9 month female. I have diabetes type II. In Nov '09, had moved to a new state, where I now live and I knew two souls, my 2 kitties. 2 months later I had a major heart attack and triple bypass surgery. One cardiologist AND his PA told me I had 5 to 10 years to live and then I would need another bypass surgery. No one explained depression could be expected afterward. But, in the meantime I have fallen in love with a guy I used to know in middle school. Such timing! I am so glad I found this site because what I know is this, we all die. It's a matter of when. I finally realize I need to live each day of my life! Each and every writing here just blew me away. Thank you all. Something else, I am a Christian and I know God has a purpose for me, I just need to figure it out. Smile
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replied May 15th, 2011
I am a 60 year old diabetic with high blood presure and had been taking meds for several years. On Jan 23 of this year I had what they called a massive heart attack and they did a stent on the right side of my heart. They sent me home and brought me back a week later to do another stent on the left side. They could not do it because the vein/artery with too beat up. They kept me in the hospital for another week and on Valentine's Day they did a triple bypass. I have been feeling kinda crappy with numbness and pain on my left chest. I have started feeling like maybe I am getting water in my lungs (forgot the word). I guess I too am feeling depressed but mainly because they don't let me do much of anything. Oh, I am married and my wife worries about me and takes care of me. If I go to the back yard, she sends my son or my grandson out with me to take care of me. I am not afraid to die, but I really don't want to leave me wife and kids alone! I have to take care of myself and my family. I am back to work and it helps to take my mind off me. I have made my peace with my savior and I plan on being around a long time, God willing!
tzepeda
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replied July 7th, 2011
Folks, Im in Australia. I had a triple by pass 2.5 years ago. I am now 52. I was of course 49 at the time.
Firstly, I recognise we are all different and we live under different circumstances, but really, dont let this simply procedure get you down.
I have a father whom has reached 85 and its been about 20 years since his triple by pass.
It is going to be a combination of either prostrate cancer or Merkel Cell Cancer that he will surcome too, not his Vascular disease or his Chronary Heart disease.
As is the general contributing factors of mortality at such an age. Meaning a lowering of efficiency of the immune system.
I continue to enjoy life fully, Ive traveled around the world for the first time, walked countless kilometres around Rome, New York, Washington, Connecticut, U.K.
The issue is to treat the experience like a bad flu bought. It lasts for about the same time and that is 4 or 5 days in hospital.
Im not saying its all plain sailing, for it appears that although I had NO HEART MUSCLE DAMAGE from any event prior and including the procedure giving me a clean bill of health for the Heart muscle it appears that in October last year, about 10 months ago I did have a "little Heart Attack" and sustained a small amount of damage.
You see the doctors bless them develope their personal view on concensus which often has no basis in fact, so when I went to the Heart Specialist the other day, he didnt pick up the obvious fact that after my heart bypass I had no heart muscle damage and now I do after a unusual event that keft me vomiting, losing consciousness when moving and incrediable nausea.
Thery thought it might be a stroke,but they forgot to consider a heart attack because I had a triple by pass only 18 months earlier. The bottom line is I dont rely solely on the doctors or the specialists, so Im not freaked out, even though I have never had the "pain" or "chest tightness" every one talks about.
In fact I have learnt that up to 20% of Heart Attack sufferers do not experience 'Pain".
No, you all have the burden of a lot more time, and whislt that will not apply to all it will to the overwhelming majority.
If like me you might need surgery in 15 to 20 years time, so what. 4 to 5 days in hospital, they do grafts up to 16 grafts if thats what you require and that is rare. Its simply blood flow so dont stress out. There are many tens of thousands performed in every country, its really routine.
Have fun enjoy tomorrow but for goodness sake plan to do something fun and personally rewarding in a years time and in 20 years time.
It is no more a death sentence as having your wisdom tooth out. Dont give this important but routine procedure any of your head space or create fear. Enjoy everything and remember it continues to be your life and you are the one responsible to make sure you enjoy it. I no hero and I havnt lost 1 miinutes sleep. Mark
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replied July 18th, 2011
Bypass surgery and diabetes
Hi Deb
I had my triple bypass 5 years at age 42 ago and i am also a type 2 diabetic and yes depression is someting you have to overcome for the first two years post op.Happy pills are not the answer happy family and happy freinds are. As for sex, dpression would be the root cause not the bypass, experiment to encourage sexual activity.The longevity post op is 10-15 years if you do not look after yourself then bypass would be needed if healthy 20-25 years as per my cardiologist.
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replied August 5th, 2011
Happy Story
A happy story. I kind of have one. Even though I still struggle with some depression, I am getting help for that. I had an emergency triple bypass three months ago. My scars are fresh. I was 46 with no previous indication of heart problems. I am not 100% my old self but getting stronger everyday. I've been back to work for a month now. In some ways it helps but my job is stressful so in some ways it hurts.

I am very fortunate to have a boyfriend that cares deeply for me and can see passed the scars. We are back to our usual routine of amazing sex on a regular basis. Even with the scars, he makes beautiful love to me.

I am able to walk up to three miles now and even went for a little uphill hike in the forest with my boyfriend recently. Slow but sure, I made it to the top.

Like most people who have had this kind of surgery, I wonder at times how long I have, and what's the use of continuing. But, I learned to take it one day at a time. Afterall, on the day of my heart attack and surgery, we weren't sure there would be a next day. Bottom line, no is really sure there will be another day. So if you can live for today...and make the most of it...you're doing pretty good.

I wish you all the best.
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replied August 16th, 2011
My mother is 69 years old. She had a quadruple bypass on 7/13/2011. She lives with my brother (41). I'm am writing because I am beside myself with worry. She is depressed and nothing is helping to get her out of it. I was with her in the hospital 24/7. I came home with her 24/7 for the first two weeks, and then eased out.. to go home to be with my family. I am 44 and have 2 young children at home (9 & 12). The first week home, it was a struggle to get her to do what she needed to do. "Get up and walk" "Eat" "Use your breathing exercises" "Take a shower" At one point she broke down, "I can't... you think I can.. but I can't." I was firm with her, "You have to... if you want to live, you have to. You get up, and you keep getting up. If you can't eat, you eat what you can.. and then take a bike every ten minutes till its gone. You need FOOD in your system to help you heal." While I was with her.. I pushed when I could gently push. And she got it. Pissed off and snarling.. but she got it. We hit the 3 week mark and the doc gave her the green-light. He told her she was doing great. "Go out.. go shopping, go for a walk, go visit friends, go to church... you can do light driving. You are good to go." The day after that, I started to ease out. My children needed me. My husband needed me. And I needed my home. After all, she lives with my 41 yr old brother. It wasn't as if I left her all together alone DAY 1. Here's my problem... She is LIVID. If I don't stop in a day, she's upset. If I go over there for an hour, she's upset. My brother said she's upset because she expects me to be there... 24/7. But she's got a funny way of showing it. When I do go over, she's snarling at me. IF I ask her.. "How are you?" she says.. 'what the flip do you care?' If I ask her "what did you do today?" she'll sarcasticaly reply... "I walked 3 miles today." or... she'll ignore me, and later tell my brother, "CAN YOU BELIEVE SHE ASKED ME WHAT I DID ALL DAY?"

She has lost all interest in doing anything. She won't pick up her hobbies. The day before quad bypass surgery, she sat there in bed crocheting. Now she looks at me like I've grown another head if I ask her if she wants to crochet. Yesterday, I took my daughter over with a sewing machine. I thought it would give her something to do if she showed my daughter how to sew. It's one of her loves. My mother looked at it as if I laid a dead animal at her feet. "How dare you? How can you be so cruel? How can you be so heartless? How can you be so unfeeling?" She looked at me in complete digust.

I have spoken to my brother ad-nauseum about 'DEPRESSION' and she's showing all the classic signs. He thinks she's fine. There is nothing wrong. He did take her to see her cardiologist last week, because "I" had a job interview. (again, how dare I look for a job at a time like this.)..... My brother relayed our fears regarding depression, and apparently the cardiologist said,"sure, I can prescribe her an anti-depressant. But it's just pushing another pill. Depression after bypass surgery is normal. If she wants it fine. Although, I have to tell you some patients have suicidal thoughts taking anti-depresants."

I think all my brother heard was the last part. He asked her, "Do you want this pill? You'll have suicidal thoughts from them..." and so they declined the script. He says she's fine. And yet today, she sat there staring at a blank TV screen, with her face devoid of all expression. THIS WOMAN IS NOT MY MOTHER. And I have no idea.. what to do. I can't be there 24/7.. I have children, I have a home, I have responsibilities.

I too think I'm starting to suffer from "care-giver" depresson. What to do. What to do?
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replied August 22nd, 2011
You can’t understand what your mother is going through. Sounds silly but it’s true. Unless you have experienced something like this, there is no way for you to understand. She has come face to face with mortality as a human. And more than that, she most likely living with daily pain. This goes on long after surgery. Her entire body is weakened. It hurts to move. It hurts to turn her head. It hurts to look up. It hurts to breathe deeply. Her back hurts because they pried her open. The list goes on and on. Her surgery was not so long ago. Sleeping is difficult. Her chest hurts when she tries to lie on your side. Her arms fall asleep and go numb but hurt at the same time. She tosses and turns every night and is never fully rested. Combine all of that with the emotions of knowing, really knowing that your time is short and it becomes an overwhelming struggle. I understand because I had this surgery in May of this year.
I’m 47 and this was very difficult for me. I can’t imagine being 69 and going through it. She must be tough! And I commend her for getting this far. Think about it. They cut her open with a saw. Took her heart out of her body. And then wired, sutured, and if she is like me, also glued and stapled her back together. If you think it was easy…you are mistaken!
Depression is common with this surgery. You will need to advocate for her. The doctor’s kind of take a step back at some point and leave it in the hands of the patient. Another pill in the scheme of things in miniscule. If it helps her it is worth it.
Taking one day at a time is the best advice I have to offer. We triple bypass people suspect our time is shorter. No one can really predict their time but ours is on our mind more than most. Be patient. Show love. It isn’t personal or against you. She is struggling. Don’t let what happened erase all the previous years of happiness and a good relationship.
Also understand that for some reason this surgery makes you feel very alone. Loved ones and friends want us to go back to being the person we were before the surgery. That may not be easy to do. May not even happen. They want us to simply get over it. We need more understanding than that. We need to be able to say every day that we are still in pain. That we are anxious because we are afraid where we were near fearless before. We are lonely and need comfort and love. We are lonely even when you are in the room.
Look for support groups in your area. I have not found any in mine but am thinking of starting one. Being able to share with others that know what you are feeling can help tremendously. I met someone recently in a store that saw my scar. He mentioned that he had the same and we chatted. It felt really nice to have someone who understood it all. I could have talked with him all day.
I wish you both the best.
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replied September 16th, 2011
I also would like more answers...My husband at 50 years old just had a massive heartattack and five by passes, the doctors call him a miracle...were not even sure he would survive the surgery, this happened on april 26th 2011...to look at my husband he looks every bit of 40, healthy good looking exmarine, who would have known..although his father died at the age of 53 of a heartattack..lucky i was at home with him when this happened i was smart enough to give him and aspirin, one of the first things the doctors did in the ER...I also often wonder what his life span is now, i do have alot of anxiety about this, i think that he is a miracle, but how long will i have my miracle...also he did not have cholesterol issues, he had blood clots, which is called (widow makers)...he does take blood thinners and an aspirin a day...I pray that a doctor will look at this site and give us some relief, i could ask his cardiologist but scared to...i lost my first husband to terminal cancer, iam only 48 years old, with my stress, he will probably outlive me!!! love and hugs to all!! kelli
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replied March 6th, 2012
Caltexchikk, My story is very similar. I was 45 and had a cardiac arrest during a cardiac cath test. They did 55 minutes of CPR and then a Quintuple bypass. They did not expect me to live and if I did they did not expect me to have much brain power. The removed the veins completely in both legs and I was in the hospital for two weeks. I too had no cholesterol or blood pressure issues prior to the surgery. It was quite an ordeal and I had some real depression following the surgery (which is common)and have often spent time being concerned that I would have a short life. We had figured that it was hereditary as by grandfather had died when he was in his 30's. To complicate my depression more I had to experience the death of my only child, my beautiful daughter, 6 weeks after my surgery. That was all in April 1997! It has been 15 years and I am still here. I have had a few issues with blood pressure and irregular heart beats which are corrected with medication. I am basically OK and while I continue to wonder about my life expectancy I am hopeful that I have years left. Medicine can do so much. Keep up with the doctor appointments. My cardiologist seems to keep his patients alive for a long time!!! Debby
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replied September 16th, 2011
I also would like more answers...My husband at 50 years old just had a massive heartattack and five by passes, the doctors call him a miracle...were not even sure he would survive the surgery, this happened on april 26th 2011...to look at my husband he looks every bit of 40, healthy good looking exmarine, who would have known..although his father died at the age of 53 of a heartattack..lucky i was at home with him when this happened i was smart enough to give him and aspirin, one of the first things the doctors did in the ER...I also often wonder what his life span is now, i do have alot of anxiety about this, i think that he is a miracle, but how long will i have my miracle...also he did not have cholesterol issues, he had blood clots, which is called (widow makers)...he does take blood thinners and an aspirin a day...I pray that a doctor will look at this site and give us some relief, i could ask his cardiologist but scared to...i lost my first husband to terminal cancer, iam only 48 years old, with my stress, he will probably outlive me!!! love and hugs to all!! kelli
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replied November 9th, 2011
Hi friends
I'm sorry to hear ur stories. I wanna share mine, hoping it wud give u all peace, if not happiness. I'm 25 and married to the most wonderful husband. He is 30. He had an inferior wall MI when he was 25. Two months ago he had a quad-bypass surgery. He is fine now. We dont think about these things. We actually continue with our life as if nothing has happened. We follow a healthy lifestyle. We are very happy for being together. Death comes to everyone and at unexpected times. So we are not the only ones facing death. Everyday children and youngsters die in road accidents. We are all lucky to be alive today. Consider ur surgery as a rebirth. Life really is beautiful.
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replied November 24th, 2011
Hi I had a quad heart bypass 2yrs ago...contracted MRSA and in a coma for 9 days.needed kidney dialasis to help with that but survived !!!!Still get bruised feeling in chest but thats just where I was opened up dont suppose it will never go away but thats no big deal. Feel better than ever. ok Ive put on weight but colesterol is way down to 3.9 BP fine ...Ive a lot to be thankful for Keep smiling!! oh I just turned 64 yrs
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replied March 28th, 2012
life after triple by pass
listen all,
i can tell you first hand that life expectancy is not something to be worried about.best advice i can give is stop worrying and get on with the life you are so lucky to have!!
my dad had a triple bypass at age 57 and had all of the same feelings many of you are having but managed to get over it and he is still a very active man at age 75, 18 years aftewr the surgery. when i say active i mean more active than most other 75 year olds he plays golf 3 times a week at least, hill walks, goes to the gym daily and still does any typical dad tasks around the place. he also had high cholesterol, blood pressure and type 2 diabetes.
dads not a special guy in the sense that he wasnt born with some amazing healing powers he just got on with raising his family and is in better health than me at this stage.
there is more than hope people there is proof that there is life after surgery!! live it to the fullest the possibilities to how long you will live are what you make them
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replied March 29th, 2012
Respect for others
My step farther had a tripple by pass so now my mum molly cuddles him and when their is any running about to be done she sends me.. every time I mention my depression all I get is its good for you.. she does'nt ever think about the physical exertion on me.. she would prefer to wait and take the chance on loosing me because she so panic stricken about her hubby! Great Eh..she's lost all compassion on that aspect of mothering! So, he dodges out of the draft. I get it instead.. Those withheart bypasses should respect others.
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replied April 5th, 2012
the record for life after bypass is 29 years. eat like a rabbit, no smoking or heavy drinking. walk at laest 3 miles everyday. no fast food ever. i garlic tablet per day prevents plaque build up. 6000 mgs per day vtamin c , i aspirin. keep blood pressuer low as this will damage graphs. if you have deppression get medicine. without being mean or hurtful to anyone, do not care so much about yourself. by that i mean .......stop and do not worry. do what your doctor says. i am 55 years old and had triple bypass. the discomfort will go away. you will have depression, sturnam difficulty, pain in the muscles or discomfort in chest muscle around incision for 6-8 months. turn to christ. you are here for a reason,everything is relative and connected. listen, there is a plan for you..........listen to your heart. rise above this that you find yourself. evey story is unique and none are the same as we are all different. if you clean things up. you will live. 20 years for sure. its more than you had before surgery.
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