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Risks of Smoking Cessation

Have a friend who was a heavy smoker for more than 30 years. Recently
he stopped smoking but his health condition suddenly went down tremendously. The following symptoms occurred: brownish mucus from nose, fell sick, burning throat and etc. He was a heavy smoker with daily
consumption of 30 sticks and he reduced smoking from 30 sticks to none in 3 months. When he found his health condition worsening, immediately he consulted medical doctor. The doctor advised him to smoke again in order to recover his health. My friend wants to refrain from smoking badly but he felt his body cannot sustain the outcome. He heard that some people stop smoking and caused them death. Thus I would like to seek your opinion in helping him to curb the bad habits for the sake of his health.
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replied January 27th, 2005
Friend Should Step Down Alot More Gradually
Hi,

i have smoked for over 20 years, and outside of when I was pregnant, I have never quit entirely successfully. However, I have been trying a "step down" approach this passed year. I was about a 2 pack a day person, now I smoke maybe 2 to 5 sticks a day, sometimes I skip a day. Much less shock to the system. Some vitamins and herbal cleansing remedies have not hurt either (see your local healthfood store).

My mom died from lung cancer in 1992, and I figure the risks of that are far worse than the risks of "shock"---he may try an herbal smoking cessation product, in the form of a homeopathic medication, which usually contains some trace of tobacco to ease the transition and detoxifying ingredients. The phlegm is going to come up, and probably for some time!

Herbal teas, hot baths or showers to cleanse and purify, lots of drinking water and light exercise--just walking--can really help. It has for me.


Good luck to you. R
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replied May 24th, 2005
Quit Smoking !!
Hi,
anecdotal evidence and several studies have linked depression to smoking and suggested that depression contributes to the inability to quit smoking. Glassman and colleagues studied patients during smoking cessation to determine if they were at increased risk of clinical depression.

If you have asthma, smoking is probably the worst thing you could do. Not all asthma symptoms are triggered by allergens, such as pollen or animal dander. Irritants in the air, like cigarette smoke, may trigger an asthma attack. People with asthma often have chronically inflamed lower airways. Smoke can aggravate this inflammation and exacerbate asthma symptoms. This month’s topic focuses on smoking cessation. How to stop smoking.

Quitting smoking has immediate benefits. Within minutes after smoking that last cigarette, you begin a series of changes to a healthier body. You will have more energy and breathe easier. Food will smell and taste better. Quitting smoking makes it easier to exercise and increases the benefits to your body, including an overall improvement of your fitness.

Good luck
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replied August 3rd, 2006
The only reason this happened was because his body was so damn toxic, and after he quit smoking the body was rapidly detoxifying itself... The worst thing you could do to yourself it so start again. The only reason it got better is because the body is unable to detoxify when there's that much going in at the same time.
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