Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > TMJ Forum

Tmj And Vertigo (dizziness) (Page 1)

I was told I had tmj after years of trying to figure out what was wrong with me. My neck and jaw muscles are so stiff and hard ,whenever I move them its like trying to pull a thick elastic. I wear a mouth guard because I clench my teeth, something that happens a night..Usually, but I find myself wearing it during the day now more and more. For the pain I take extra strengh tylenol or robacaxet. The worse part of this is the dizziness and vertigo. I also have what they call positional vertigo and allergies. Ive learn to control the positional vertigo but when the vertigo happens just by streching my neck muscles now thats scary, the nausia and vomiting is very much part of it also, I take bonnamine for that. I just started physio and she got my exercising my jaw muscles by stretching them, I was told that your supposed to let the muscles heal by letting them relax, and moving my neck from side to side to stretch the neck muscles, not a neck roll because it makes your neck crack and thats not good (so im told). I also seem to have sinuse congestion all the time and I steam them morning and night to help keep my tubes unclogged. If anyone has the same problems would like to hear what you do to help improve your tmj and vertigo problems.

Edna
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First Helper edina963
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replied November 28th, 2004
Re: Tmj And Vertigo (dizziness)
edina963 wrote:
i was told I had tmj after years of trying to figure out what was wrong with me. My neck and jaw muscles are so stiff and hard ,whenever I move them its like trying to pull a thick elastia. I wear a mouth guard because I clench my teeth, something that happens a night..Usually, but I find myself wearing it during the day now more and more. For the pain I take extra strengh tylenol or robacaxet. The worse part of this is the dizziness and vertigo. I also have what they call positional vertigo and allergies. Ive learn to control the positional vertigo but when the vertigo happens just by streching my neck muscles now thats scary, the nausia and vomiting is very much part of it also, I take bonnamine for that.! I just started physio and she got my exercising my jaw muscles by stretching them, I was told that your supposed to let the muscles heal by letting them relax, and moving my neck from side to side to stretch the neck muscles, not a neck roll because it makes your neck crack and thats not good (so im told). I also seem to have sinuse congestion all the time and I steam them morning and night to help keep my tubes unclogged. If anyone has the same problems would like to hear what you do to help improve your tmj and vertigo problems.


Edna
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replied May 11th, 2011
dizzyness light headedness?
a long time ago i was hit in the jaw then i twisted my neck and now like 8 years later it seems to get worse the neck and jaw feel like not connected right but ive been feeling dizzy like crazy though and i never went to the hospital or doctor but i dont know whats making me dizzy the dizzyness seems to get worse and worse and i cant really move around a lot i just like to lay in bed because that helps .do you think the dizzyness could be an inner ear thing or a jaw neck thing. im going to the doctor on friday its like a lightheaded dizzyness
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replied September 7th, 2011
tmj
hello,
a few years ago i had a bad bang to the back of the head, within momths i had vertigo,jawpain, earache nausia,and i found i could no longer look st an lcd screen, i was misdiagnose with minieres disease, finally after about two years i was diagnosed with tmj,i was put on dosulepin, it actually relaxes the muscle in the jaw and gets rid of the earache, and the vertigo i do clench my teeth which sets the pain of in my jaw, the tablets are an antidepressant, but work well with tmj
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replied January 30th, 2012
I have the same issues and I see a psychiatrist. He put me on clonopin at night and that realy helps the bruxism which is at the core of the issue. Try to hit it from all sides.
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replied March 16th, 2005
I Am Going Through This
Just as you describe it. Some symtoms are more and some less but it is identical even in the way the symptoms go together. For a longest time I thought I had allergies and sinus trouble. Even taking alegra. What was strange that alegra would help. Only since the end of november I felt a strong positional vertigo and dizziness. I have not gone to every doctor to diagnose because after trying a few I see there is no help coming, I have to do it myself. I suspected tmj now for over a month and seeing your post confirms what I was feared. How did you find it and are you sure its tmj 100%. I also give a possibility that the neck may cause the symptoms of tmj, c1 and c2 not the other way around.
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replied January 30th, 2012
its very important to see a tmj SPECIALIST that just does this type of thing. It is curable but you have to find the correct practitioner. Again clonopin at night helps the bruxism which is realy hard to understand because you do it in your asleep and dont know it.
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replied February 18th, 2012
TMJ Recovery is possible
you need to see a tmj or TMD (temper mandibular disorder) specialst which is a dentist. they will provide you with a splint for the day which will balance your jaw and relieve the tight nest and cause your entire muscular system to relax to its natural state. I have had TMJ for over 20 years. All my symptoms were relieved just be the mouth splint. No one should need to suffer from this problem. Seek out a dentist that specializes in TMJ. and Yoga helps too.
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replied September 21st, 2012
I had arthrocentesis yesterday, and now my face and arms are numb and I feel dizzy. Is this normal?
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replied June 22nd, 2005
Reference to What Edna963
I just wanted to let you know that I was diagnosed with bppv a couple of yeats of ago. It is very scary and comes on without any warning. I went for physical therapy and this helped. Now I have tmj on my left side the same side that the vertigo affected. I took your suggestion and tried bonnamine and this has helped. Thank you, keep your fingers crossed.

Jodevan
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replied February 16th, 2006
Positional Vertigo And Sinus Congestion
I've had infrequent problems with vertigo, especially coming on at times when I have had sinus congestion. Recently when it didn't go away shortly after waking I saw a doctor again who suggested rinsing my sinuses with a saline solution. I have had good results with the rinsing, although at first it was a little difficult (squirting a lot of water up my nose). There is a pretty good kit out there if you can find it. It's made by neilmed and I bough mine at the kaiser permanente pharmacy.
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replied February 17th, 2006
Tmj......does It Ever Go Away
Since my last posting, I have had no luck with my mouth guard...My problem was the clenching was so bad that they had to remove my teeth, the clenching had caused damage to my teeth ,gums and jaw. Im still getting use to the dentures but the pain is less severe. I do use a sinuse rinse, about 4/times a day, it has realy help keep my tubes from blocking wich then causes the liquid not to build in my ears.

I do the stretching,exercise, massage...I eat right...But I feel that nothing has realy changed, it hurts when I eat,laugh,smile, talk. My neck muscles get so tight that when I move my head I get an instant spin that just makes me drop to the floor for fear of falling,,(its scary)... My jaw doesnt open very wide,,even have trouble sliding my dentures into place.

Giving up is not an option,, I feel that maibe im doing something wrong and that why after so many years im not getting better...Im up for suggestion and willing to try anything ...Except drugs. Doctors have been giving so many meds that I dont take them for fear of addiction,,besides who takes meds that cause dizziness when you have a problem with dizziness.

Thanks for reading,,

edna
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replied July 7th, 2011
Treating TMJ syndrome is a multi-step approach. Your bite must be flawless (I've had a couple porcelan onlays to perfect it, and they were life savers.) You must hit rock solid on your molars at the same time. Your bite cannot be too tall or high. You can't bite and slide. When the joint is tired or strained, you must find a way to jack open the back of the jaw while pushing up on the chin. I use my finger to push down hard on the last molar. My thumb pushes up on the chin hard. I have neck issues due to heredity and poor posture. The TMJ will get better but it takes years and a very good dentist, who is good at equilabrating. Equilabrating should be done gradually and with a polishing stone. I've had my teeth eqil. over 25 times. Mouth guards are bad because they raise your bite. Anything that raises your bite is a no-no. Remember, more folks have TMJ than don't have it. My opinion only-hope it helps!
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replied January 30th, 2012
try the clonopin only at night.
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replied February 17th, 2006
How do you steam your sinuses? My sinuses are clogged every morning when I wake up and all day they stay bad. I cant even blow nothing out. Maybe all of my bad sinus problems are because of tmj...
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replied February 18th, 2006
Sinuse Congestion
Hi kevin, saw your posting....Steaming your sinuses is just inhaling steam, I would put hot water in a bowl place a towel over my head over the bowl and just breath in my nose....I have however stopped doing it because my doctor told me it that it only made the stuffiness worse, I now just place a mask (mask with a gel inside ) that I heat up and place over my eyes, with the nasal rinse it helps get the mucus flowing and then relieves the sinuse pain. But if I am realy stuffed up I will steam but not for long just enough to get the flow of mucus. I cant realy say if my sinuse problems are caused by my tmj but everything seems to be connected together, its realy weird. Today im feeling the sinuse pain and with that I have jaw pain and tight muscles in the back of my head,neck and shoulders...Could be the cold weather were having, might be the way I slept last night...Im just trying to get through the day.....

Edna
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replied February 19th, 2006
Supporter
All the symptoms that have been mentioned here are definitely tmj symptoms, but also check with an ent doctor about your ears. It will probably still be tmj, but it still wise to check.

Also, I recently began going to a massage therapist who specializes in cranial sacral work and my sinuses have unbelievably opened up and that's only after one appointment. I have had tmj, sinus and ear problems for years so this is a really major event. I am looking forward to see what happens when I continue going to this therapist (which I am).

To find out if you have tmj, go to a dentist who is familiar with tmj and ask. Usually the jaw joint will pop occasionally and there might be pain, but not always. Mris will show if a tmj disc is out of place but again, you can have tmj with a disc looking like it's in place. It's a very complicated disorder with most medical people either overlooking it or at a loss as to what to do. The most reliable treatment so far has been bite splints (make sure to get them adjusted occasionally) and stress reduction.

Carol
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replied March 4th, 2006
Hi carol,,,the funny thing about ent's is that they are not alike, ive seen two of them and they dont agree on the same method for my ear problem. But both agree that the ear clog feeling , the dizziness, the virtigo, the tightness near the ears are not caused but tmj, but the dentist who specialises in tmj said its all connected. In april im going to the department of otolaryngology/head and neck clinic, my last hope......He better be worth the trip to toronto.
Massage therapy wasnt working for me so they gave up....After the session my muscles would tighten up again,,but im curious about this cranial sacral...What is it and what do they do??????
I dont hear any popping sounds or grinding , I figure its just my muscles ,but when examined he told me he felt the grinding sound...He did say I needed to work on my clenching, relax the jaw.....Easier said then done..........

Edna
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replied March 5th, 2006
Hi edna,

i just wanted to tell you that I can totally relate to a lot of what you are saying. I have tried physical therapy many, many times and although it helps at that moment, it seems like the minute I leave everything tightens back up again and the cycle starts all over. It is very frustrating. I tried acupuncture and had the same experience. I know that i, too, clench at night - I had an nti-tss night guard and I cracked it within 6 months. The dentist was surprised and said he had never seen anything like that and suggested we go back to the upper one and that one also is starting to crack a bit. I even take a muscle relaxant at night but it doesn't seem to help me from clenching. I wake up every morning with horrible headaches. I'm sorry I don't have any suggestions - just wanted to let you know that I can relate. :) take care.

-kerianne
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replied January 30th, 2012
clonopin is an anti anxiety drug that dramatically reduces bruxism at night. you should realy look into it. It will get you back on your feet. I also have had success with a GOOD chiropractor. One that can actually make adjustments and realign your spine. No clicky voodoo stuff. Remember that not all doctors are alike and some are just plane crap. So if your not getting results switch doctors and get other opinions. And see a TMJ Specialist that actualy knows what he's doing. dont give up hope!
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replied March 6th, 2006
Supporter
Edina
Edina,
there are many different types of massage therapy and then there are good, so-so and bad massage therapists. So you usually end up having to try a few before you get the perfect one. Call before you go and ask questions what they do for tmj patients. Below is a list and explanation of several types of massage therapy. Hopefully this will help you decide what to do.

Types of massage or techniques
(there are other kinds also. If anyone would like to add others, please do.)

terms & descriptions that can help when choosing a therapist.

Deep tissue massage
techniques which utilize deep tissue/deep muscle massage are administered to affect the sub-layer of musculature and fascia. These techniques require more advanced training and a more thorough understanding of anatomy and physiology. The muscles must be relaxed in order to effectively perform deep tissue massage, otherwise tight surface muscles prevent the practitioner from reaching deeper musculature. It helps with chronic muscular pain and injury rehabilitation, and reduces inflammation-related pain caused by arthritis and tendinitis. It is generally integrated with other massage techniques.

Intraoral massage
intraoral massage is an effective treatment for clients who suffer from tmj dysfunction, trigger point-related headaches or excess jaw tension. Latex-free gloves are worn while working inside the mouth to release the muscles and fascia involved in mastication and jaw clenching. This modality is used in conjunction with massage techniques for the face, scalp and neck muscles that affect jaw alignment and tension. Common factors in tmj dysfunction that can be helped by massage include poor posture, whiplash injuries, chronic tension or overuse, bruxism, stress, and muscle imbalance caused by occupational habits.

Lymph drainage therapy
lymph drainage therapy is unique in that healthcare professionals learn how to palpate the lymphatic flow. As they develop their skills, they can then identify the rhythm, direction, and quality of the lymphatic flow. Advanced practitioners will be able to precisely map the lymphatic flow to find alternate pathways for drainage. Developed by bruno chikly, m.D., lymph drainage therapy evolved from years of training in traditional medicine, oriental medicine practices, and manual therapies. (definition provided by the upledger institute.)

myofascial release
myofascial release is the three-dimensional application of sustained pressure and movement into the fascial system in order to eliminate fascial restrictions and facilitate the emergence of emotional patterns and belief systems that are no longer relevant or are impeding progress. First, an assessment is made by visually analyzing the human frame, followed by the palpation of the tissue texture of various fascial layers. Upon locating an area of fascial tension, gentle pressure is applied in the direction of the restriction. Myofascial release is an effective therapeutic approach in the relief of cervical pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, scoliosis, neurological dysfunction, restriction of motion, chronic pain, and headaches.


Myofascial trigger point therapy
based on the discoveries of drs. Janet travell and david simons in which they found the causal relationship between chronic pain and its source, myofascial trigger point therapy is used to relieve muscular pain and dysfunction through applied pressure to trigger points of referred pain and through stretching exercises. These points are defined as localized areas in which the muscle and connective tissue are highly sensitive to pain when compressed. Pressure on these points can send referred pain to other specific parts of the body.


Neuromuscular therapy
this comprehensive program of soft-tissue manipulation balances the body’s central nervous system with the musculoskeletal system. Based on neurological laws that explain how the central nervous system initiates and maintains pain, the goal is to help relieve the pain and dysfunction by understanding and alleviating the underlying cause. Neuromuscular therapy can help individuals who experience distortion and biomechanical dysfunction, which is often a symptom of a deeper problem. It is also used to locate and release spasms and hypercontraction in the tissue, eliminate trigger points that cause referred pain, rebuild the strength of injured tissues, assist venous and lymphatic flow, and restore postural alignment, proper biomechanics, and flexibility to the tissues.


St. John
st. John’s neuromuscular therapy seeks out the cause of pain, focusing on creating a balance between the muscular and nervous systems. This bodywork focuses on five basic principles — biomechanics, ischemis, trigger points, postural distortion, and nerve entrapment and compression — that are important factors in the body’s physical homeostasis. Also, attention is given to hormonal balance, nutrition, and elimination of toxins. This therapy is used to treat soft-tissue pain throughout most of the body.


Swedish massage
one of the most commonly taught and well-known massage techniques, swedish massage is a vigorous system of treatment designed to energize the body by stimulating circulation. Five basic strokes, all flowing toward the heart, are used to manipulate the soft tissues of the body. The disrobed client is covered by a sheet, with only the area being worked on exposed. Therapists use a combination of kneading, rolling, vibrational, percussive, and tapping movements, with the application of oil, to reduce friction on the skin. The many benefits of swedish massage may include generalized relaxation, dissolution of scar tissue adhesions, and improved circulation, which may speed healing and reduce swelling from injury.

Craniosacral therapy
craniosacral therapy is a gentle, noninvasive method of evaluating and enhancing the function of a physiological body arrangement called the craniosacral system. Developed by john e. Upledger, d.O., o.M.M., this manual therapy enhances the body’s natural healing processes and has proven effective in treating a wide range of medical problems associated with pain and dysfunction. The craniosacral system consists of the membranes and cerebrospinal fluid that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord. It extends from the bones of the skull, face, and mouth — which make up the cranium — down to the sacrum or tailbone. Since this system influences the development and function of the brain and spinal cord, any imbalance or dysfunction in the craniosacral system could cause sensory, motor, or neurological disabilities. These problems may include chronic pain, eye difficulties, scoliosis, motor-coordination impairments, learning disabilities, and other dysfunctions of the central nervous system. Craniosacral therapy encourages the body’s natural healing mechanisms to improve the functioning of the central nervous system, dissipate the negative effects of stress, and enhance health and resistance to disease. The craniosacral therapy practitioner uses a light touch to assist the natural movement of fluid within the craniosacral system. Therapists generally use only 5 grams of pressure, roughly the weight of a nickel, to test for restrictions in various parts of the craniosacral system. It’s often possible for the evaluation alone to remove the restriction and allow the system to correct itself.


Soft tissue release
soft tissue release (str) is a powerful injury treatment technique developed in europe with the world’s fastest sprinters. Due to the amazing amounts of prize money and endorsement contracts available to these athletes, faster and more permanent results were warranted. Str was developed to meet this need. Recovery rates once considered impossible by traditional therapists and sports medicine doctors were achieved. These are not new concepts, but are based on european osteopathy techniques, along with insights from quantum physics. In recent years, str has been given clinical application for chronic low back pain and whiplash injuries. Str deals directly with the reasons for soft tissue dysfunctions and subsequent referred pain and nerve entrapment. In acute conditions, str affects the insidious way scar tissue is formed, and in chronic conditions str breaks up the fibrotic and adhered mass of scar tissue to quickly allow the muscle to return to its natural resting length. Once the muscle or muscle group has returned to the original resting length, there is an immediate release from the pain induced by the inflammation response. With str, the client is placed in a particular position so that the muscle begins to stretch in a very specific direction or plane. The exact location of the injury has been defined and a determined pressure is applied directly into the affected tissue or along a specific line of injury. At the same time, depending whether passive or active techniques are being used, the client is given a set of instructions that now engage the antagonist of the muscles involved. The muscle is extended from a fixed position in a determined direction under a pinpoint of pressure. Decrease in pain and increase in range of motion are often immediate, offsetting any minor discomfort experienced. Str can be modified so there is no client discomfort at all. The flowing motions of str and total client control afford new levels of deep tissue work and subsequent pain relief.

Visceral manipulation
visceral manipulation enhances the normal mobility and tissue motion of the organs of the visceral system. Hypertonicity, displacement, and adhesions can all cause organs to work against each other, creating chronic irritation and fixed, abnormal points of tension. The visceral organs are dependent on their ability to move freely in the visceral cavity to then work correctly and efficiently. When they are pulled out of their effective positions, they cease to function properly. By freeing each organ to work compatibly with the others, a therapist can potentially alter and improve the structure and functioning of the entire body.

Information came from cymy sue of tmj talk.

I hope this information helps. All the best to you and god bless...
Carol
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replied March 8th, 2006
Hi kerianne,, boy do I know what you mean about the clenching, I havent broken one of my mouth guard but ive cracked one and left another with my teeth marks that had to be smooth out every week , ive noticed now that I bite down on my denture during the day and I remove them at night. So if im clenching I only notice the tightness on the side of my temples and jaw. I dont know if this ever happen to you but when I wake up my eyes get freeky...Its like they are bouncing up and down and I see flashes, some say its migraine but my headaches are more sinuse related, I will also get a bit blurry but then my eyes are alright after a few hours, it might even come and go,,realy weird.

Hi carol, will certainly check out these different types of massages, im familiar with some, love the deep tissue massage, to bad it didnt work fo me. Thanks, very appreciated.
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replied April 14th, 2006
Helloi was curious about the kind of foods to eat,,i try to stick to soft foods..But then when I feel im ok i'll eat anything. I figgured the soft food diet was for when you couldnt chew because of the pain , but then it realy doesnt matter what I eat...I can realy feel it the next day when I wake up. Muscles are tight , headache, dizziness, can't open my mouth wide...And the pain. Well tmj sufferers you know what I mean...Should I stay on a complete soft diet, im on a liquid diet for a few days to rest the jaw, but still doing the exercise.

Thanks
edna
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replied April 16th, 2006
Supporter
Edna
Hi edna,
i don't know what type of exercises you are doing so i'm not sure what to suggest other than I know it is usually a good idea to keep muscles active, but if they are injured or painful, they are supposed to be rested. I like to do certain stretches rather than "exercises." http://www.Dcdoctor.Com/pages/rightpages_w ellnesscenter/homeexercises/homeexercise_n eck.Html

a soft food or no-chew diet is usually a good idea to rest the joint. Even when you are feeling good, you should rest the jaw to soft foods at least. No gum, chewy, hard, or open mouth very far. Baby your jaw at all times (even during those good times). I can't find the one resource I have seen but the following site has some recipes -
http://www.Tmjfriends.Com/forum/index.Php (go down to life and then nutrition, recipes, etc.)

also, watch your posture especially when you sit at a computer or desk. Check out the following site for pictures and further information -
http://www.Nismat/org/ptcor/tmj/

hope something helps. Take care (use lots of moist head and/or ice also).
Carol
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replied April 20th, 2006
Hi carol,,,wanted to let you know that the web sites dont seem to exist. I dont know why , I just cant seem to open the web page/site. When I mean exercise...I meant stretching,its about all I can do. I put heat....Ice. I try my hardest to keep the muscles active but its also possible that I might have over stretched them a bit,,,i do the stretching till I feel the stretch/some pain and hold......... But I think I know what the problem could be,,its what im eating. I will stick to a non chew diet or soft foods. I should have know when I would get the weird feeling after eating , I would get dizzy, instant headache and jaw numbness with some pain in front of my ears. Thanks
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replied June 4th, 2006
Soft Diet
Ive been doing it since mid april, soft diet....Liquified to the point of sucking through a straw...And still muscle tightness/dizziness after a meal. Ive noticed that my facial muscles are very tight and when I try to massage it it feels like there is a lump near the front of my ear, theres no pain just a numbness and tightness of the face. Because of neck and shoulder tighness/ stiffness/pain, my doctor gave me amitriptyline, like ive said before I hate taking pills but its getting to the point were nothing seems to be helping so I will see what this does.
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replied June 22nd, 2006
Well the amatriptiline didnt work, pain/ tightness still there...He now has me trying baclofen and for the pain endocet. I kinda feel that my dotor is a pill pusher..Should I suggest an examination of my jaw?....Maibe its dislocated or something...Its been over two years and I realy feel like nothing has been done or is ever gonna be done. The lump turned out to be muscles on my cheeks/in front of my ear. Tried to massage it but it doesnt go away. Could it be possible that my muscles are shrinking? Cant seem to keep my neck and back straight, always end up hunched over and as for my jaw im clenching more then I used to.

Edna
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replied December 4th, 2006
This Is What Worked For Me
I have been suffering from tmj for 2 years. I have had dizziness, sore neck muscles, facial pain, headaches, and clogged ears (all the time). I have been to 3 ent's, 2 oral surgeons, chiropractors and have had acupuncture performed. None of the above was able to help me. It was a living hell for more than 2 years. What I did was go back to the starting block. I did a great deal of reading about different symptoms and came to a conclusion that the neck mucles are in control of the equilibrium, the eustasion tubes and the facial musles. I started a daily exercise program using 10 lb. Dumbells. I perform 5 different exercises to help strengthen the neck muscles. After 4 weeks on this program, my tmj nightmare is over. My neck is strengthen and therefore my head position is correct and all of the symptoms are gone. This may not work for all, but it is something to consider.
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replied December 8th, 2011
strong neck
HI, i have suffered with similiar symptoms for three years and also believe strongly it is the upper cervical neck. Could you please tell which strengtheniing excersises you did and how much weight you used. thanks heaps.
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replied January 20th, 2007
Hey nightmare, had the same idea of working on my neck muscles, but my problem is that everytime I try to do weights I would get realy dizzy and my body felt weak. I try to keep wrist weights on for a few hours and its very difficult, and they are not even close to 5lb. I never knew that tmj was so hard to fix. I just try to keep positive and try to do the best I can to indure.

Edna
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