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Strenuous Exercise After Hip Replacement (Page 1)

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I was wondering if there are any very active people out there who've had one or two of their hips replaced? I had one of mine replaced two years ago, and have been working out very regularly so I can hike and climb mountains with my husband. My doctor has said anything goes as long as I don't feel pain, but i've also read that jogging and any high impact exercise is not good. Any feedback, folks? We're getting ready to racewalk a 20k race in a couple of weeks, and i'm starting to wonder how many years i'll have this hip for at the rate i'm going. Oh yes, I do a little bit of jogging, but mostly walking and cardio machine workouts, with strength training. Thanks for any help you can provide Smile
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First Helper User Profile Gaelic
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replied July 25th, 2005
Please be very careful with weight bearing exercises. My hip replacement is 9 years old and I am scheduled for a revision soon. The stem is loose which may or may not be a result of over-doing it at the gym. It's easy to forget that you are and always will be vulnerable. Good luck.
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replied January 18th, 2013
Need a replacement
Hi, I am 19 years old and was just told that I need a total hip replacement. I am very scared and obviously nervous that I won't be able to do some of the things I do now. I'm not super active, but I sometimes go to the gym. Does anyone have any suggestions for me before I get the surgery?
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replied January 18th, 2013
Especially eHealthy
campusgirl,

If you are needing a total hip replacement at the age of 19, you are probably not very active right now, or you would not be needing the replacement.

As to what you can do after a hip replacement, is probably pretty much the same as you are doing right now, or even a lot more.

In the immediate post-op period, there will be some restrictions on what activities and positions that you can do, to prevent the dislocation of the prosthesis.

Once you are out of the immediate post-op period (a few months after the surgery), you will be able to do just about anything you want, that is not impact in nature. In other words, you should not plan on running, jogging, or impact dancing. Twisting and pivoting activities should also be limited.

But, you can go out on walks as much as you would like. Stationary cycling and swimming are also great activities for joint replacement patients. Light weight lifting (avoid squats and the like) is also permited.


So, again, if you are so bad off that you are needing a total joint at such an extremely young age, you are probably pretty sedentary already. Thus, you will most likely be able to do a lot more after the surgery, than you can do now.

The big thing is to protect your total joint after it is put in. The indication for a joint replacement is for the treatment of pain (not managed by any other method). So, you will most likely feel a lot better after the replacement, and as such, will want to go out a do a lot of things that you cannot do now. But, remember, the prosthesis will only last for so long, before it wears out.

Having a replacement at such an extremely young age will mean that you will have to have some revisions of the joint during your lifetime. Revision surgery is much more difficult and carries higher risks/complications, than the initial replacement. So, you will want to keep them to a minimum. Thus, it is very important for you to protect your joint prosthesis.

Staying fit and strong are ways to protect the joint. Maintaining a healthy weight is another.

Patients who stay in "good shape" by walking, cycling, or swimming, generally can make their prostheses last a lot longer. So, total joint patients are actually highly encouraged to be physically active. Just limit the amount of impact and twisting activities that you do. Other than that, you can do just about anything you want to do (including sexual intercourse and childbirth).


Good luck. Hope you have a very successful surgery.
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replied January 19th, 2013
Well I was somewhat active, but then I was diagnosed with avascular necrosis.
If your not aware of what that is, it is lack of or cut off of blood flow to a joint causing bone death. I have that in both hips, but worse in my right. So the doctors limited me to what I should be doing to try to keep my condition from getting worse. However, it still got worse. So I do need the surgery and at such a young age it's terrible but this contisiong I guess is very rare in someone my age anyways. But they seem hopeful that it will help. So thank you for you input!
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replied January 19th, 2013
Especially eHealthy
campusgirl,

Sorry that you developed AVN.

Are they going to try to do any core decompression surgery or a vascularized bone graft, before jumping straight to a total joint replacement (to try to salvage the femoral head)?

Usually, if the femoral head has not collapsed, a core decompression of the femoral neck and head is tried, in extremely young patients. Sometimes, again, if the head has not collapsed, a bone graft taken from the leg (the fibula), along with its artery, is transplanted to the femoral neck. The use of the vascularized graft can sometimes bring the blood supply back into the femoral neck and head, thus saving the joint.


But, if the femoral head has already collapsed, then the decompression surgery cannot be used. And, about the only option is to replace the joint.


It is very uncommon to put a total joint in a very young patient, but not unheard of. Total joint surgeons try to avoid it if at all possible, or delay as long as possible, just because the joint prostheses do wear out.

And, replacement is not a panacea, it does have its problems. But, if it is the only viable option, then the patient just has to deal with problems as they arise and try to prevent them as much as possible.

Again, the biggest problem is that the prosthesis does wear out. Currently, the prostheses are lasting about 15 years, give or take.

The longer the patient can get the prosthesis to last, the fewer revision surgeries will be needed. Revision surgery is more difficult to do, and carries higher risk/complications. Every time surgery is done, scar tissue forms and some of the bone stock around the joint is lost. So, there comes a time, when no more revisions are possible. This varies between patients. Some patients can have three, four, five revisions, and do okay. Others, have problems after just a couple.

So, you want to keep the numbner of replacements/revisions you have to a minimum. You can do that by protecting the prosthesis. And, you can protect the prosthesis by maintaining a proper weight, staying physically fit, and avoiding impact/twisting activities.


Thus, if you are currently using crutches (or a wheelchair), after the surgery you should be able to walk unassisted and even do light athletics (walking, swimming, cycling, weight lifting, etc). Most surgeons want their patients to do physical therapy before the total joint, so that they will have the best range of motion possible and be as strong as possible. By doing this, getting over the surgery is a lot easier.


So, again, you will most likely be able to do just about anything you want to do, as long as you are not putting a lot of impact stress on the joint. You just have to be very smart and protect your joint.


You should discuss your surgery at length with your surgeon. Be sure to ask what you can do after the surgery. You might also want to look up the website for the AAHKS (American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons). The Association has several very good articles on post- replacement activities and therapy. It also has a website dedicated to the “proper” positions for sexual intercourse after having a total hip. Having a total hip at such a very young age, you will most likely be very interested in this website. This is also something that you should discuss with your surgeon. Also, having a total hip does not preclude you from having a baby, if you so desire.


Good luck. Hope your surgery goes well. Work hard on your post-op therapy, and protect your joint.
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replied January 19th, 2013
Yeah I have discussed the decompression and other options with my surgeon and he said they were not an option because of where the avn is at in my hips, like where exactly it is on the femoral head, and how mine is advanced. He said the other surgeries would not be to my advantage and would have a very low success rate. So, we are down to getting a replacement. I am not the most happy with that but if it is going to help, I will do anything to help. I have been in constant pain for years and I need something. But I did discuss the surgery and he explained most of it. Also explained that I will be able to return to my normal activities after recovery. He just said I won't be able to do impact sports or anything like that, which I don't do anyways. So I feel that overall it should work out well for me. I appreciate your help.
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replied January 20th, 2013
Especially eHealthy
campusgirl,

No problem.

Yes, if you are significantly impaired by your hip pain, and nothing else is possible, then a total joint is a viable option. You just have to be careful.

Do look up the AAHKS website, specifically the one on "sex after a total hip". Many patients do not like to discuss this with their surgeon, but it IS a very important aspect of life. And, most likely, something that you are going to want to do (LOL). Again, there are some "positions" which could put the wrong stress on the total hip, causing a dislocation. So, it is very important to know what to avoid and how to do "it" properly.

Good luck. Wishing you the best.
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replied February 5th, 2013
Hey. I am 20 and have AVN and between July 12th 2012- december12th 2012 I had core decompression that failed and then 2 total hip replacements. I had the right one in September and left in December I'm 6 weeks out from the last one and I'm doing really awesome. It's been tough being down for 8 months but was worth it. If you want to contact me you can email me
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replied July 25th, 2005
youngatheart wrote:
please be very careful with weight bearing exercises. My hip replacement is 9 years old and I am scheduled for a revision soon. The stem is loose which may or may not be a result of over-doing it at the gym. It's easy to forget that you are and always will be vulnerable. Good luck.

wow! 9 years? That's not very long for an artificial hip to last. What type of replacement do you have - metal, plastic, ceramic? I know the ceramic heads on polyethylene liners are expected to last 20+ years, and they are specially good for young, athletic patients.
There's a professional ice skater - rudy galindez - who had both hips replaced with ceramic implants and has been back skating professionally for years.
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replied June 15th, 2012
Total hip replacment
hi
I had my total hip replacement 7 weeks ago and im finding it easy to walk, the operated leg is 3 mm longer then the others, that takes a while to get used of but im getting there, i have apain in my shoulder and has anyone else had this, maybe its the alighnet now since new hip but all my pain is gone and i hope the body will realign to my new hip now, any ideas and i feel its so important to do the e xercies and walk as much. I walk 5 times aorund the house, 4 times a day with no crutch or anything now. Its all about the weight on that leg as my leg wonders now what is going on as the past 4 years, i had all my weight on the good leg, . I cant reach to tie my laces, when does the hip loosen so i can reach my toes etc, any replies would be great ty and any xerices for me so the hip gets 100% loose so i can tie my laces, maybe its to early yet after 7weeks???
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replied July 1st, 2012
Hip Replacement Recovery/Heel Lift
Hi Kevin,
I had my right hip replacement on April 16, 2012, and I started putting on my socks and tying my shoes (struggling) around 8 weeks, and each day got easier, and at 10 weeks no problem. My low back and right glut ached, so I went to get massages. My operated leg is also longer 2-4 mm and the physical therapist and doctor suggested I wear a heel lift and it does take some of the pressure off
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replied August 5th, 2012
Your leg will be ok in the end. If you do your exercises properly both legs eventually will be the same length. I had my second hip replaced in March 2012
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replied August 25th, 2012
HIP REPLACEMENT
Doing your exercises properly does NOT guarantee that both legs will eventually be the same length. This is such utter nonsense! I have had hip replacements, revisions and knee replacements and I really do know what I'm talking about. However, you do get used to the different leg lengths, and the different position the back is placed in.
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replied July 26th, 2005
Strenuous Exercise After Hip Replacement
I'm very active. I had my hip replaced 11 1/2 years ago with plastic and titanium. It's been a great ride so far. But i'm due for an update soon. I don't do impact activities, i'm a cyclist. Doctors recommend cycling and swimming for those patients who want their hips to last but want to stay active. If you're hip is made of newer materials it should last longer. And i've heard that keeping the muscles around your hips strong helps too in terms of the life of the hip.

Scotty
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replied July 29th, 2005
I'm one of those people who has to workout really hard in order to keep my weight down. It's kind of hard to do with a hip that hurts or aggravates you, but I always push myself to burn those calories. Regardless if i'm in pain or not. If and when I get an artifical hip, I know I will put it through the paces. Maybe by then the techniques and materials might have improved even more.
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replied August 3rd, 2005
Thank You
Thank you for all your input, folks. I've been taking it easier on the weight bearing exercises for a few months now, and it seems to have helped. Meanwhile, I hope you end up not needing the revision surgeries, youngatheart and scotty. Still, if you do get it done, at least I hope it goes better with you than the first replacement. Good luck, and god bless!
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replied September 6th, 2005
Thank you all for your input. I really don't know why my hip replacement failed after 9 years; it was titanium. The pain was most intense around and above the knee and in the middle thigh. I wasted a lot of time thinking it was a bad knee. My original hip surgeon thought everything looked fine; and of course, the knee surgeons couldn't find anything wrong with the knee. My biggest mistake was not getting a second opinion from another hip ortho early on. Sometimes you can have too much confidence in one doctor. At last I went to the mayo clinic and they diagnoised it right away as a loose stem. I'm going to have revision surgery later this month in jax. If you so inclined, please remember me in your prayers and blessings to you all.

Youngatheart
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replied October 20th, 2005
Re: Strenuous Exercise After Hip Replacement
ecbarbarian wrote:
i was wondering if there are any very active people out there who've had one or two of their hips replaced? I had one of mine replaced two years ago, and have been working out very regularly so I can hike and climb mountains with my husband. My doctor has said anything goes as long as I don't feel pain, but i've also read that jogging and any high impact exercise is not good. Any feedback, folks? We're getting ready to racewalk a 20k race in a couple of weeks, and i'm starting to wonder how many years i'll have this hip for at the rate i'm going. Oh yes, I do a little bit of jogging, but mostly walking and cardio machine workouts, with strength training. Thanks for any help you can provide :)
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replied October 20th, 2005
Hip Replacement
I´m 48 yearso old and need to go through a hip replacement because of arthrosis.My quality of life has become really uncomfortable and have pain when I walk more than 10 minutes. I used to be a very sportive person, I climbed mountains, hiked a lot and, most important of all I love skiing. Anybody knows whether there is any posibility of doing things like that once you go through the hip replacement?I´m interested mostly on people who has gone through that and keeps on doing exercises and sports.I can give up running and I could do some bike riding and swimm, which are specially indicated with this problem, but it is very difficult for me to quit hiking and skiing not very often, but at least from time to time.I know that moderns prothesis are good enough to last quite a lot, I could take care whenever I do exercises. But then I was told that there is the risk of luxation of the hip and that scares me a bit.
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replied May 7th, 2012
I am 59 and had both hips replaced (5 weeks apart) in 2008. I am also a Nurse and work 12 hour shifts. I don't climb mountains, but do work full time as well as drive a tractor during 'hay' season.
I have had luxation on my left hip... but not on my right. When it happens, it frightens you, but with slow movement the 'problem' will reduce on its own. Each time this has happened, I was cleaning low or weeding my flower beds. I have had so few problems and so little discomfort, I tend to forget and bend too far.
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replied October 22nd, 2005
Hip Replacement And Mountains Sports.
I would like to know the experience of anyone who is a mountainer or hiker, skiier, or love mountains in any of its ways, and had the bad luck of going through a hip replacement. I need one, am scheduled for it in january, and I really love any kind of mountains activities, specially skiing. Any piece of advice or experience on that matter will be really helpfull for me.
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replied October 22nd, 2005
Re: Hip Replacement And Mountains Sports.
lili_gui wrote:
i would like to know the experience of anyone who is a mountainer or hiker, skiier, or love mountains in any of its ways, and had the bad luck of going through a hip replacement. I need one, am scheduled for it in january, and I really love any kind of mountains activities, specially skiing. Any piece of advice or experience on that matter will be really helpfull for me.


hi, I understand and share your many concerns about being able to continue doing the things that you love after having a hip replacement.

I am 31 years old and have been putting up with the effects of a childhood hip disorder since the age of 13. I have degenerative joint disease in my right hip, and my hip bothers me alot. Like you, I am a big outdoorsman; I love the mountains and one of my strongest passions in life is hiking. I live for these activities.

At this time my hip is not bad enough for a hip replacement, but eventually I will more than likely need one; probably by the time I hit my mid 40's or 50. I think about what I will be able to do with a hip replacement, and I also think about what I won't be able to do. I can't imagine life without being able to hike or without the ability to be physically active. Having said all of this, i'm sure that you will be able to do as much hiking as you want; provided that you listen to your body and don't suffer any bad falls. Hip replacements have come along way.

What type of hip replacement are you receiving? I know that the new ceramic on ceramic hip implants are supposed to offer the longest implant life; these are ideal for younger, more active people. The fact that you are 48 years old puts you in the "younger, active" category.

A few years ago, an olympic athlete named rudy galindez had both of his hips replaced with the ceramic on ceramic hip implants and he went back to ice skating within a few months and he was in top form. He was in his early 30's I believe at the time.

Anyways, I would love to hear more about your situation as well as your hiking life...I live in southern california and the hiking opportunities here are endless. I went on an 8 mile hike last week(with a 2600 foot elevation gain) and handled it well. I did encounter an elderly guy who had to be about 80 years old who was using two hiking sticks to complete the same hike that I was doing. He was going slow but damn if he didn't make the whole hike. So, there is alot of inspiration out there.....And i'm sure you will get good use out of your hip. Hiking is a relatively low impact activity - at least compared to running, jumping or jogging.
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replied January 27th, 2006
Hip Replacement
Boy am I glad to find this site-i am a 33-year-old mother with twin 3 year olds, and a 4 year old,i just had a hip replacement done 3 weeks ago-i am thoroughly amazed at the speed in which I am recovering-and how great I feel-i was looking for info/validation that there are people who live normal active lives, since I can not bear to think of being "stagnant"! I used my bowflex for 6 months prior to surgery, and am itchy to get back to it, since I feel as if I am sitting watching my progress drift away as I heal. None the less, I walked 3 1/2 miles on my treadmill a few days ago-and it made me cry from happiness! My walking is slower than before the surgery, of course, and I still hobble a little, but it feels like a smoother gait is not far away!
Hearing you others talk about hiking and working out really gives me hope. I did get a titanium hip with a porcelain head, so I am hoping for 20 years-of course that means in my 50's i'll need a second hip, but figure technology will be so advanced my then, maybe I can just take a pill!!
Wishful thinking, -but thanks either way for inspiring me! -cindy
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replied April 26th, 2006
Exersise After Hip Replacement
My birmingham hip replacement is now 5 months old it's great and like most people that have hade a hip replacements I wonder why I put up with the pain from my hip for so long, I now find that I can walk, some what slower, but I am not very flexible and after 5 months I feel that I should be able to put my soxs on and tie my shoe laces, or am I expecting to much at this stage,i can put them on but it's a real battle I would like to find some exersises's that I can do that will strengthen my hip, and some that will help with geting some of my weight that I have put on with 4 months of taking it easy
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replied February 16th, 2012
Birmingham Hip Replacement
I am 62, I had a birmingham hip replacement in April last year, after 3 weeks i was back cycling and swimming every day. Being able to live without constant pain is awesome. I can even walk 10klm with ease now. In 3 weeks I will return to bike racing again (albeit masters category). I avoid impact sport, no jogging or weights. With the weight remember the most important part is what you put in your mouth!! That determines how much effort you need to do to burn the stuff off again. I still don't have a 100% flexibility and left shoelaces are tricky but hey its a 1000% better than what I had for 18 years. Keep stretching and pushing your personal boundaries if you want to improve the fitness.
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replied May 16th, 2006
Exercise After a Hip Replacement
As a 57 year old woman I am supposed to keep up the weight bearing exercise to fend off the dreaded osteoporosis. 6 months after my replacement and I walk as much as possible and use an exercise cycle, but it seems rather tame and doesn't shift the weight that has piled on. Has anyone got experience of body pump or body balance classes after surgery?
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replied May 28th, 2006
Re: Hip Replacement
goharv wrote:
boy am I glad to find this site-i am a 33-year-old mother with twin 3 year olds, and a 4 year old,i just had a hip replacement done 3 weeks ago-i am thoroughly amazed at the speed in which I am recovering-and how great I feel-i was looking for info/validation that there are people who live normal active lives, since I can not bear to think of being "stagnant"! I used my bowflex for 6 months prior to surgery, and am itchy to get back to it, since I feel as if I am sitting watching my progress drift away as I heal. None the less, I walked 3 1/2 miles on my treadmill a few days ago-and it made me cry from happiness! My walking is slower than before the surgery, of course, and I still hobble a little, but it feels like a smoother gait is not far away!
Hearing you others talk about hiking and working out really gives me hope. I did get a titanium hip with a porcelain head, so I am hoping for 20 years-of course that means in my 50's i'll need a second hip, but figure technology will be so advanced my then, maybe I can just take a pill!!
Wishful thinking, -but thanks either way for inspiring me! -cindy


hi cindy -

i just discovered this site and wanted to let you know that I am a 46 year old female and it has been 3 1/2 years since my total hip replacement. You see, I was a marathon runner in my previous life and kept running on an injury until I was shocked when I was told I needed a complete hip replacement. I was bone on bone with incredible pain. Since my surgery, I am relatively pain free and remain very active. Of course, I don't run anymore but I swim, bike and hike on a regular basis. I do a lot of weight lifting but mostly upper body since I am careful not to add too much additional weightbearing stress on my hips. My surgeon says that my x-rays are dream and she uses them often for teaching medical students.

I do miss running... It was a tough decision but I want this prosthetic to last as long as possible. I have a ceramic cup with a cross-lnked polyethylene liner and an uncemented titanium stem. My surgeon says this should last me at least 20 years. It's been a complete mind shift for me and now I look at runners and think about the stress they are putting on their joints.

I hope your recovery went well and that you are leading an active and pain-free lifestyle again!

The question I would like to put out there is has anyone heard about vibration and effects on hip replacements? The power plate and vibra fit vibrational technologies claim to increase bone mass and lean body mass. I've reviewed the scientific literature and there is not a lot out there yet. Does anyone have any experience with this they can share with the rest of us?

Thanks, malia
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replied June 12th, 2006
Re: Hip Replacement And Mountains Sports.
I am 39 and had a left hip (metal on metal socket) replacement on may 29, 2005 and the results have been outstanding. I am a travel agent and my primary business is selling group ski trips. As a result, I spend quite a bit of time in colorado. I skiied about 20 days this year and my hip never bothered me once. The quality of life has improved dramatically! My hip flexition has greatly improved which has made my day to day activities pain free.

I was a very active person (softball, skiing, exercising, flag football, etc) until the pain began to severely limit what I could do. About 6 months prior to surgery I was walking with a severe limp and was really limited to what I could do. It got t the point where I could not reach down to tie my shoe laces. Since my operation, I have cut out softball and football (just about anything that is high impact), but have really gotten into cycling. In fact, I am training to do a 100 mile ride in august which is really exciting.

The bottom line, have the surgery because you will love the results. Be smart about your activities. I ski just about any terrain I want, I am extremely careful about skiing bumps though. That can put quite a bit of strain on the joint so I just avoid them....Most of the time.

Feel free to shoot me an email with any questions and I wish you the best!

lili_gui wrote:
i would like to know the experience of anyone who is a mountainer or hiker, skiier, or love mountains in any of its ways, and had the bad luck of going through a hip replacement. I need one, am scheduled for it in january, and I really love any kind of mountains activities, specially skiing. Any piece of advice or experience on that matter will be really helpfull for me.
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replied August 4th, 2006
Re: Hip Replacement And Mountains Sports.
Glad to hear your metal on metal is working well for skiing. I am having my right hip done this fall, i'm 50 and want to continue biking, skiing, golf and maybe some moderate tennis. What type of metal on metal did you have? A full replacement or resurfacing? Was it biomet m2a magnum large ball? That is what they are recommending for me.




roo1788 wrote:
i am 39 and had a left hip (metal on metal socket) replacement on may 29, 2005 and the results have been outstanding. I am a travel agent and my primary business is selling group ski trips. As a result, I spend quite a bit of time in colorado. I skiied about 20 days this year and my hip never bothered me once. The quality of life has improved dramatically! My hip flexition has greatly improved which has made my day to day activities pain free.


I was a very active person (softball, skiing, exercising, flag football, etc) until the pain began to severely limit what I could do. About 6 months prior to surgery I was walking with a severe limp and was really limited to what I could do. It got t the point where I could not reach down to tie my shoe laces. Since my operation, I have cut out softball and football (just about anything that is high impact), but have really gotten into cycling. In fact, I am training to do a 100 mile ride in august which is really exciting.


The bottom line, have the surgery because you will love the results. Be smart about your activities. I ski just about any terrain I want, I am extremely careful about skiing bumps though. That can put quite a bit of strain on the joint so I just avoid them....Most of the time.


Feel free to shoot me an email with any questions and I wish you the best!


lili_gui wrote:
i would like to know the experience of anyone who is a mountainer or hiker, skiier, or love mountains in any of its ways, and had the bad luck of going through a hip replacement. I need one, am scheduled for it in january, and I really love any kind of mountains activities, specially skiing. Any piece of advice or experience on that matter will be really helpfull for me.
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replied August 7th, 2006
I had a total hip replacement. They implanted a cementless titanium stem and the ball and cup are a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy....Whatever that is. They said if I did not abuse it too much that it could last 20+ years....I am not holding my breath on that one....But I am trying to take care of it and not overdo any activities.

Hope that helps....Let me know if you have additional questions.
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replied August 8th, 2006
roo1788 wrote:
i had a total hip replacement. They implanted a cementless titanium stem and the ball and cup are a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy....Whatever that is. They said if I did not abuse it too much that it could last 20+ years....I am not holding my breath on that one....But I am trying to take care of it and not overdo any activities.


Hope that helps....Let me know if you have additional questions.



thanks for the info. Did your doctor even discuss hip resurfacing instead of a full replacement with you?
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replied June 14th, 2007
Re: Hip Replacement And the Power Plate
lehua wrote:
goharv wrote:
boy am I glad to find this site-i am a 33-year-old mother with twin 3 year olds, and a 4 year old,i just had a hip replacement done 3 weeks ago-i am thoroughly amazed at the speed in which I am recovering-and how great I feel-i was looking for info/validation that there are people who live normal active lives, since I can not bear to think of being "stagnant"! I used my bowflex for 6 months prior to surgery, and am itchy to get back to it, since I feel as if I am sitting watching my progress drift away as I heal. None the less, I walked 3 1/2 miles on my treadmill a few days ago-and it made me cry from happiness! My walking is slower than before the surgery, of course, and I still hobble a little, but it feels like a smoother gait is not far away!
Hearing you others talk about hiking and working out really gives me hope. I did get a titanium hip with a porcelain head, so I am hoping for 20 years-of course that means in my 50's i'll need a second hip, but figure technology will be so advanced my then, maybe I can just take a pill!!
Wishful thinking, -but thanks either way for inspiring me! -cindy


hi cindy -

i just discovered this site and wanted to let you know that I am a 46 year old female and it has been 3 1/2 years since my total hip replacement. You see, I was a marathon runner in my previous life and kept running on an injury until I was shocked when I was told I needed a complete hip replacement. I was bone on bone with incredible pain. Since my surgery, I am relatively pain free and remain very active. Of course, I don't run anymore but I swim, bike and hike on a regular basis. I do a lot of weight lifting but mostly upper body since I am careful not to add too much additional weightbearing stress on my hips. My surgeon says that my x-rays are dream and she uses them often for teaching medical students.

I do miss running... It was a tough decision but I want this prosthetic to last as long as possible. I have a ceramic cup with a cross-lnked polyethylene liner and an uncemented titanium stem. My surgeon says this should last me at least 20 years. It's been a complete mind shift for me and now I look at runners and think about the stress they are putting on their joints.

I hope your recovery went well and that you are leading an active and pain-free lifestyle again!

The question I would like to put out there is has anyone heard about vibration and effects on hip replacements? The power plate and vibra fit vibrational technologies claim to increase bone mass and lean body mass. I've reviewed the scientific literature and there is not a lot out there yet. Does anyone have any experience with this they can share with the rest of us?

Thanks, malia


Hi, I am 62 and two years down the line after having both hips replaced. I have recently been to a sports medicine clinic to see why I still don't walk properly (trendelenburg). He referred me to a physio who has me doing special exercises for the abductors AND using the power plate. I must assume he knows what he is doing but it does seem rather scary to me. I may not run or play tennis but I am allowed to used the power plate? hmmmmmm? Anyone out there have a comment or experience with the power plate?
thanks for your input Smile
joan
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