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Pain In the Butt! (Page 1)

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Hi
i am not talking about my husband Wink
i seriously have pain whenever I sit down. Does anyone else suffer from this? I feel like I can feel the bones in the buttock area pressing against the seat and it is extremely uncomfortable.
I don't know exactly what this is, but it may be the sacroiliac joint.
Looking for answers.
Thanks,
lori
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First Helper wise817
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replied July 13th, 2004
Extremely eHealthy
Sounds weird & painful!! I would suggest you seek advise/suggestions from physiotherapist, chiropractor & dr - see what each says then do some research on-line via a search engine to see who makes the most sense to you!! Confused
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replied July 17th, 2004
Pain with sitting is not at all unusual. However, by your description that you feel "the bones in the buttock area pressing against the seat," it sounds as if you may have irritated you "sit bone" (ie, your ischial tuberosity). There are a number of tendons, including your hamstring tendons, that attach to the tuberosity. Here's a test you can do for yourself. If you can press around your sit bone and reproduce your pain, then it's not likely that the pain is coming from your back or sacroiliac joint.
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replied July 18th, 2004
Thank you for suggesting an answer. I did your test and can reproduce the pain. I have explained my pain to at least 4 doctors and no one has told me about ischial tuberosity, but it sounds exactly right. I was doing exercises (the wrong way without realizing it) that had me sitting, then bending over and lifting weights, bringing the shoulder blades together. (i was looking at a exercise video and thought I was doing it right, but after awhile the pain set in.) I have always been super flexible, but I think I ended up bending myself like a jack knife.

Now that I know what it is, is there anything I can do to help it?
I appreciate your help so much!
By the way, I am seeing a doctor in manhattan tomorrow and will discuss it with him.
Thanks,
lori
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replied July 19th, 2004
First, let me clarify that ischial tuberosity is not a condition, but the technical name for your "sit bone" (like "patella" is the name for the knee cap). The diagnosis might be something like "proximal hamstring tendonitis," which mean inflammation to the hamstring tendons where they attach in the butt.

I think the treatment depends on why/how the problem developed. The first order would be to identify and eliminate any offending forces (eg, particular exercises or movements that are irritating the area and preventing the problem from healing). You may also need to do some stretching exercises to some hip muscles, and your therapist may need to perform some manual therapy to the area. See what your pt thinks.

Tendonitis to other body parts can be treated by your md with a cortisone injection, though i'm not sure if an md would inject that area.

By the way, my physical therapy practice is in manhattan. Which orthopedist is treating you?
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replied July 19th, 2004
I do not live close enough to manhattan to see a doctor regularly there. I live in the poconos, but am originally from staten island, and travel to manhattan for good doctors, good entertainment, and good food. :d

today I went to see Dr. Edwin su at the hospital of special surgery.
I never met him before. He specializes in arthroscopic surgery of the hip and knee.

I have recently had mri's of the back and hips, because of pain (which I think came from improperly exercising.) I have two bulging discs in the lumbar spine, and mild to moderate arthritis in the hip joints. I have the pain I described to you when sitting, but have also noticed that I have pain and clicking when walking or biking in the front of the hip. My interest in talking to him was to see if arthroscopic surgery of the hip might correct the problem.

To be honest, I really don't think he believed I was in so much pain. (i look healthy because I am in shape, eat right and, until recently, exercised.)
his diagnosis was the pain in the buttock was coming from the bulging back discs. He said arthroscopic surgery is only performed if there is a tear near the hip joint, and that I might benefit by having another mri at his facility because it is higher resolution and may show something the other one did not.


I really do think one of my problems is what you described. I have had tendonitis in the past of the wrist and shoulder, and I did irritate the area by improperly exercising. The problem is I cannot stretch that area, because of pain in my hip. I also have developed an inflammation of the bursa.


Thank you for taking an interest and giving me some information. I will pass it along to my physical therapist.

I appreciate your help.

Lori
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replied May 9th, 2005
How Did You Get Further With It ?
I have also exact the same problem .
Up to now I went to a doctor and got 3 shots but after a few weeks (4) the pain in the butt came back.
The only complaint a have is sitting. My hamstring seems okay.
I can stretch them as before. (with one leg on the table).

Now the doctor want operate .
He wants to release the hamstring-tendons from the bursa..

I don't know what to do...

I have the problem now for 6 months.

How did it resolve ?? Or didn't it ?

Kris
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replied April 3rd, 2009
Butt pain
I have had this same condition for more than two years and nothing helps except pain pills and they do not cure it and have unpleasant side effects. Voltaren cream feels good when it goes on but does not cure either. I am glad to have some new words to use as all I have been told is arthritis and/or coccyxidemia. Is surgery my best option or what? Sarah
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replied April 7th, 2009
My 17 yr old brother...same problem
My brother is 17 and a singer/dancer at school. He has been having the same problem. His buttock hurts only when he is sitting, he said he can feel a knot. I think the pain is getting worse. I took him to the ER and they gave him pain pills, however they are too strong. He even had a X-ray and there was nothing. I'm wondering if he hurt a bone or muscle from dancing. My brother is also 6'7 so I know all those dance moves sometimes require falling to the floor..at 6'7 that's a great fall. Not sure what step to take next.
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replied August 1st, 2009
I have had all these symptoms and a year ago I was diagnosed with Bursitis of the sit bone. I also think mine came from doing yoga poses incorrectly. I don't think that it is ever going to go away, or so it seems. I was put on Celebrex for about a year and had to stop because it was causing major stomach problems. I am guessing that I will have to deal with this for a really long time because I don't think that surgery is beneficial, since the bursa will just become inflammed again.
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replied October 15th, 2009
I too have this 'pain in the butt'! I tore my hamstring attachment due probably to a rotation and imbalance in my pelvis, which is very common in women especially. My right leg does not stretch as far as the left when stretching the hamstring, and on and off it hurts to sit. The problem is I think we are always re-injuring a sensitive place by sitting- which is almost impossible not to do!

Has anyone found something to sit on that is more comfy? I was thinking that a supportive ring placed around it would help. Surgery sounds strange to me for this issue- what exactly would be done?

If it is a tendon problem, then self- massage across the fibres of the tendon is very helpful and can help it heal. All you have to do is rub the top of the hamstring where it attaches to the sitz bone. Topricin's cream is also helpful to reduce inflammation, as is ice. Alternating heat and ice, keeping each on for about 2 mins is miraculous at healing tendons and soft tissue. It takes work and time, but now writing this, I am reminding myself that there are things I should and can be doing to feel better.

Jennifer
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replied January 4th, 2010
Here is my story...I found reliefe...hope this helps...

For the past six years, the pain in my 'butt' got worse and worse. Essentially it would start hurting the moment I sat down and get worse and worse. Eventually I came to know the 'butt' as the ischial tuberosity...At first it was just annoying, but eventually it got so bad that I had to have a special memory foam pad that I carried around with me to sit on almost any chair. Finally it got so bad that I bought a special desk that I could raise up so I could work standing up... ...no amount of exercising (or lack of exercise) would help as the act of sitting down itself seemed to be the primary problem.

For several years I was under the 'care' of two orthopedic surgeons (one for hip and one for back). They took x-rays, told me some nonsense about me having bone spurs, etc...and that there was basically nothing I could do except get cortisone shots every few months for the rest of my life (I am 38 and that didn't sound so great to me). I finally pushed them into prescribing physical therapy for me from a great sports therapist - he thought it had to do with either tight hamstrings putting pressure on the tendon at the ischial tuberosity or perhaps bursitis or maybe some sort of nerve problem. Unfortunately after three months of very detailed therapy, my therapist told me he didn't think it was helping and that physical therapy was unlikely to be my solution. I agreed, as any relief that I got was less than a 5% improvement in my pain...

That was when I had the breakthrough. I know this sounds crazy, but I went to see a chiropractor that a friend recommended (Dr. Thorne at Greenville Avenue Chiropractic in Dallas) and within 5 minutes of poking around at various pressure points he said 'I think all you need is some calcium'. Evidently, if you are calcium deficient, the blood will drain calcium from your bones and this can interfere with the ability of tendons to properly heal in the normal course of life. I actually felt a significant difference immediately after my first session with the chiropractor...probably a 50% improvement.

I have now been taking calcium pills (1500mg 2x per day of any brand of calcium citrate with vitamin D for absorption will do) for three weeks and had three sessions with the chiropractor. I would say I am now 80% improved with constant improvement...if I never got any better I would be fine just three weeks ago I was worried about my future. However, I believe that over time as the body absorbs the calcium that I am taking my pain will be gone entirely.
Literally this has been like a miracle for me.

At a minimum try the calcium and if you are so inclined, find a good chiropractor to go to as well. I don't know if the calcium would have done the trick or not without the chiropractor, but regardless this is what happened to me. I can tell you with confidence that the typical MD route will have nothing to offer for your pain. Good luck.
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replied January 16th, 2010
Paain in the bum only when sitting not during exercise
i have this pain too , but only when sitting ... i dont get this pain when i bend over or run, i only get it when sitting , i am a soccor player and have heard of the ischial tuberosity and thought that is what it was , but now im not too sure , anybody got any ideas what mine is :S ,
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replied February 5th, 2010
Pain in Bottom
sue1
I have had my pain for over 2 years and am getting no where. My doctor gave me an injection into the hip joint which I new was not the problem. Have also had acupuncture which didn't help. My pain hurts more when I sit but also hurts when standing. I also get pain and sometimes tingling in the pelvic/groin area. I have had back surgery in the past and wonder whether I might not walk as I should. I also find it hard sometimes to lay on that side at night. I might try the chiropractor and see if he can help.
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replied February 23rd, 2010
Hi...I have almost same problem, but I cannot reproduce the pain when I poke around it. When I poke its as if there is no pain but when I sit it would be uncomfortable and after some time it would start hurting...any clue??
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replied April 16th, 2010
severe butt bone pain
Hi, I''m a software engineer and my work is to sit infront of computer for whole day. I have the same butt bone pain and i''m afraid of getting up from my seat. Horrible pain, My age is 27 and if i start calcium pills at my age is that worth ? Please someone help?
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User Profile
replied April 20th, 2010
Ischial Tuberosity pain
Yes indeed, I can relate to most of the foregoing. If I sit on a semi-hard surface (computer chair/car seat etc) the pain soon starts and thereafter extends down the left hand thigh area. I''ve tried various cushions in all sorts of positions but no relief to date. However, I read recently on one of the forums that sitting on a large book, although rather hard, did in fact reduce the pain for longer periods. Armed with this knowledge and being inclined to try anything after many months (and however weird it sounds), I cut my self a piece of seat-sized pressed-wood shelving and hey presto !! I''m sitting here at my computer writing this with no thigh pain at all, just the feeling of bone-on_wood after awhile, which at least I can ease around a bit. Gonna try it out in the car later with an old towel under and over the board. What a break-through this seems to me after all my pains and woe !!! I sure hope this works for others too.
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replied May 3rd, 2010
I have had ischial tuberosity pain for about the last nine months. Multiple doctor visits, months of physical therapy and months of hamstring stretching exercises at home did nothing to relieve the pain. Last month I had an MRI, which revealed there was no fluid build-up, no tearing and only mild hamstring inflammation. My orthopedic doctor did a steroid injection under X-ray guidance to ensure that it was injected in the correct spot. A week later at my follow-up visit, we were both dismayed that the injection gave me absolutely no relief. However, he astutely noticed that I have long legs for my height, and when I sit in a chair all the weight of my torso rests on my butt-bones. I have to stretch my legs out to make my calves touch the seat of the chair and spread the weight more evenly across the bottoms of my calves and butt. I made a cushion out of an exercise mat that''s about an inch thick, and that seems to make chairs and car seats fit me better and spread the weight across my calves more. I have also been taking 3000 mg of calcium with Vitamin D after reading xray 9999''s post, which has reduced the pain quite a bit. I thought that being a truck driver caused this problem. My orthopedic doctor said my work definitely doesn''t help, but sitting improperly for all these years is probably the culprit. Oddly, the seat in my truck is now the least painful to sit in because it is height-adjustable. I raised it about an inch and now my butt feels almost normal again, but I''m definitely going to continue taking calcium.
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replied May 14th, 2010
Wow... this all does sound painful for you - and a bit frightening. Have you tried ultrasound?? I have used ultrasound for my clients in treating hamstring, tendon and sciatic problems - the hardest part of treating "pains in the butt" is that manual therapy (massage) or ice/heat doesn't reach deep enough to stimulate the area to get it to heal. Ultrasound can penetrate deep enough to reach those tendons and cause some effect to reduce the inflammation and jump start the healing. There's a great home use device you can purchase - use it 3 times per day if you can for 2-3 weeks - you should feel results in a few days but keep up the treatment. Do it before bed, before sitting for a long time (car rides, work) and first thing in the morning. Excellent treatment and really very effective. I'm an RMT. Best of luck.
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replied June 28th, 2012
Ishial Tuberosity Pain
Could you tell us more about this home device for ultrasound?

I have had this problem for only the last 6 weeks but I have been unable to walk for longer than 5 min and/or sit for longer than 5 min so I mostly lie in bed. I have two herniated discs and have had to back surgeries so my sports doctor thinks that the problem with my ishial tuberosity pain is stemming from my discs.

Has anybody heard of prolotherapy? I had my first out of six treatments 10 days ago and am slowwwwwwwwwwly healing. Basically it is a dextrose solution that is injected into the site of the pain and surrounding areas that increases imflamation to build cartilage. Much more effective than cortisone injections or nerve blocks as this is a long-term solution and many people with ishial tuberosity pain have found long lasting relief.

I am in Canada so we don't have many doctors but I know in the US there are lots of doctors.

Good luck,
Amina
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replied July 10th, 2012
sit bone pain
I have this sit bone problem from being a masters sprinter--two years ago after much discussion we settled on PRP ( prolo with ones own blood package) much more potent that simple prolo...it took several months , and two treatments but eventually the problem was solved...we recently had to visit that area again because she tore a hamstring tendon in the exact same area doing ballistic block starts in track training...we are now doing another PRP and expect it to work just as well--the chiro/naturpath we have is outstanding, even now doing stem cell injections--only one in Oregon that we know of...the best kinesiologist I have ever been around, we educate ourselves on health and we believe that this may be the only fix for this problem ..btw--cortisone will only make the tissue more receptive to rupture and tear--stay away from them..
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replied June 1st, 2010
To all of you:

Read Mary Bond's book, "The New Rules of Posture." In it she explains the proper way to sit, which is NOT on your tailbone or buttocks--you should have 40% of your weight supported by your feet, and the other 60% should be primarily on the upper portion of your thighs in front of your sit bones. You should not be bearing weight on your tailbone at all.

Good luck to all of you.
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