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Ruptured Gallbladder

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How do you know if your gallbladder ruptured?
First Helper OdessaJones
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replied July 16th, 2004
Im not even sure if this is possible but you would know.
You wouldnt even be able to stand. The pain would be excruciating.
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replied September 10th, 2005
Yes, it is definitely possible for your gall bladder to rupture. Mine ruptured two days after I gave birth to my son, and I ended up having to stay in the hospital for 17 days due to severe complications. It was the most intense pain that I have ever felt in my life. I had 2-3 gall bladder attacks beginning two weeks before my son was born, and then in the middle of the night, I woke up screaming. Within a few hours, I couldn't walk, move, etc., and was throwing up green poison. I've been told that the majority of individuals who experience a ruptured gall bladder will suffer from a high fever and a rapid rise in blood pressure. Unfortunately, I didn't show any of these side effects, and due to the fact that I had just given birth, it was hard to determine what was going on and I was misdiagnosed with gall stones. The surgeon did not realize that my gall bladder had ruptured until they went in to do surgery. If your gall bladder has ruptured, you will be in such intense pain and experiencing such severe effects that you wouldn't be able to be on the computer. But, I hope that you did see a doctor about this.
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replied September 14th, 2005
Anonymous
I was doing some research to better understand what my best friend is going through and found this forum. She is 24 and right now is in the hospital being treated for septicemia as a result of a ruptured gallbladder. I'm trying to understand what the doctors are explaining to her mother and I but all I hear is "we're doing all we can, just have to wait and see." i'd like to know if anyone has known of someone recovering from a severe case like this. I've read a few medical articles on this covering sympoms, statistics, treatments, and mortality rate. So far we've seen her have the fever, blue tint of the skin, high blood pressure with sudden low drops, delerium, rapid heart rate, and everything else possible. She's been in isolation for a day now and treated with iv fluids and meds. But I need to know what her chances are of all that working. If anyone can help, please do.
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replied September 14th, 2005
That is terrible about your friend. I can completely understand. As I said in my earlier post, my gall bladder ruptured after my son was born. I basically sat in the hospital room for another day and a half waiting to have surgery because I was misdiagnosed due to the fact that I didn't have a high fever or my blood pressure rise and they thought my severe pain was just gall stones. Because I laid there for that time with the poison running through my body, I developed septicemia as well. When they went in to do the surgery, my surgeon discovered that it was ruptured and said that she really needed to open me up, but that I was so sick at that point that I would not have survived surgery. I spent several nights in icu because at that point the septicemia was causing my liver and kidneys to shut down. My left lung was completely filled with fluid. I also was developing pancreatitis due to the complications, and later a small touch of pnuemonia. My blood pressure was running around 90/39 for several days. I was fortunate in the case that my fever only reached 102.7 for a short time and then the remainder was around 99 -100. It took tons of fluids being pumped into my body for my kidneys to start working several days later. I was then moved into a regular room on the floor where I stayed for basically another two weeks. I also had to use an incentive machine for my lungs, and do breathing treatments three times a day. After 17 days, I was finally realized from the hospital. It was a very rough recovery, but the help of my pulmonologist, surgeon, and my ob/gyn, I was able to make a complete recovery and I feel great now. I do have to say that they said I bounced back quicker than they thought, but it is definitely doable.
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replied July 19th, 2012
gallbladder attack
I have had this same pain under my right rib area for like.almost four.years now off and on...I would go to a doctor only I am scared. I find that greasy oily fatty fried foods upset it everytime..
should probably stop with the oily foods..Lool...but I am up now like late because of the pain..and oh the agony...I really don't have insurance and I hear it costs tons to get it removed or even checked...what other options do I have...anyone..??
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replied April 27th, 2007
Thank you so much for the information on this, I was looking up this subject on google, and I couldn't find anything. I've been scared that my gallbladder will rupture, because I've had more than 20 gallstones in me for almost 6 months now, and probably longer, just didn't realize it. I'm 17, so the doctors took three months to diagnose me with it, they were convinced it was all in my head untill they took me to an ultra sound. So far I've had attacks every second day for 6 months and just yesterday I had three in a row so I was so scared it ruptured. I did vomit, but it wasn't green and I can still walk. Thank you so much for that information, you've eased my mind. =) Is there any signs before it ruptures? Or is there anything specific that causes it to rupture?

Thank you!
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replied March 17th, 2012
For one year every time I had meat with my meal within several hours later I would have severe pain and become nauseated for six hours. After fifteen episodes and two emergency visits at Kaiser emergency and three shots of pain killers they finally told me to see the surgeon and gave me an appointment for six days later. The day before the appointment I woke up filling nauseated and unable to stand up straight. I called Kaiser and they said that they were booked and said that I had an appointment the next day. I told them that if I could not see someone today I would not be alive tomorrow. The gave me an appointment a 3:00 PM and performed surgery at 7:00 PM. My gall bladder had reputed and required seven hours to remove it, the surgeon said he had to burn some of it because could not remove it all. My recommendation is to have it removed after any problems, a 30 min procedure.
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replied March 17th, 2012
For one year every time I had meat with my meal within several hours later I would have severe pain and become nauseated for six hours. After fifteen episodes and two emergency visits at Kaiser emergency and three shots of pain killers they finally told me to see the surgeon and gave me an appointment for six days later. The day before the appointment I woke up filling nauseated and unable to stand up straight. I called Kaiser and they said that they were booked and said that I had an appointment the next day. I told them that if I could not see someone today I would not be alive tomorrow. The gave me an appointment a 3:00 PM and performed surgery at 7:00 PM. My gall bladder had reputed and required seven hours to remove it, the surgeon said he had to burn some of it because could not remove it all. My recommendation is to have it removed after any problems, a 30 min procedure.
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replied March 30th, 2012
Ruptured gallbladder
My gallbladder ruptured after only two attacks. I actually felt better after it ruptured. I had a low grade fever and felt a little unwell, but really not too bad. I was on a holiday in another country and waited until I arrived home a week later to see my doctor. I told him I thought I was fighting infection and that my gallbladder had possibly ruptured. He said I wouldn't be sitting there talking to him if that had happened. He said maybe I was getting the flu and said he'd send me for an ultrasound but it would be a few weeks. So I waited another few days, then went to Emergency at the urging of my daughter. They did an ultrasound, followed by a CT scan and kept me in. I didn't get home for 12 days. Things were such a mess that the doctor couldn't remove it, so I had a tube draining the gallbladder for 16 months. Finally a doctor who specializes in difficult cases was able to remove the gallbladder with laproscopic surgery. I was very lucky because he thought I'd probably need the bigger surgery which I had the first time. So now I'm just fine after two surgeries with a drainage tube between the two of them! But I just wanted to say not all people are incapacitated by this. I've been told by many doctors and nurses I must have a high pain tolerance and I know this isn't the norm, but it can happen.
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replied April 16th, 2012
Ruptured gallbladder
My mother of 81 was faily fit and healthy and loved life. She recently vomited and thought she had strained her side when vomiting. 24 hours later She was rushed into hospital with a ruptured gallbladder. She was given a 5% chance of making it through the operation. She has now been in ITU for 9 days with no improvement in her condition. Blood pressure is all over the place she refuses to breath on her own and urine output is very poor. She is not fighting the infection and today we have been told to prepare for the worst. We continue to be positive but things are not looking good. If you think you have the symptoms it is important to get it looked at, even if your wrong with diagnosis it does'nt hurt to get it checked out. And please if your in pain dont hide it from your family. It could save your life.
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replied April 25th, 2012
Jackie my prayers are with you I know exactly what you're going through the same exact thing happened to my father Xmas day they gave us no hope they told us the bile infection had caused him brain damage kidney failure and liver damage they didn't want to perform a repair surgery on him because he had no brain Waves but I am grateful they still operated on him he survived his surgery while on a coma he was in a coma for about 5 days after surgery he was on 24 hour Hemodialysis he had all sorts of drAins coming out of his stomach he had all sorts on meds coming down his iv he was on a ventilator he gradually came out of his coma he lost alot of weight because he was unable to eat for about 3 months he had a tpn his lungs filled with water he had pneumonia and from being bed bound he lost three toes dues to poor blood flow it's been 4 months today and I'm happy to say he's a miracle yesterday they pulled out his last drainage line he's eating solids anything is possible just have faith in god we had many many days where they said he wasn't going to make it and that there wasn't anything they can do since he had two repair surgeries and had a massive stomach leak my father is Older as well which mAkes it more delicate I pray to god she pulls out of it.
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replied April 16th, 2012
Experienced User
A perforated gallbladder very often causes reduced pain due to relieving the pressure on the gallbladder wall that was causing the initial pain. Pain will usually return within hours or days but it is a different sort of pain, usually caused by peritonitis. Typically this will mean part of all of the abdomen is sensitive to pressure, breathing may hurt, but particularly sudden movement is painful. One diagnostic of peritonitis (which can be caused by many things, not just ruptured gallbladders) is to press slowly on the abdomen and release suddenly. Mild pain with the pressing, but sharp pain when released, is a strong sign for peritonitis.

A high proportion of symptomatic gallstones will eventually cause perforation but it is still quite rare because people with gallstone symptoms just don't ignore that pain. This is just one of several potentially fatal complications from gallbladder disease, and any signs such as high temperature associated with gallbladder problems need to be checked immediately.
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replied May 30th, 2012
Thank You!
I thank all of you for your comments here. I was told by a Dr. recently to just deal with my gallbladder pain and even though I placed my self on a limiting diet due to the pain in my gallbladder. It was determined it had to come out, I am glad to know now that it can still rupture. Because this jerk of a Dr. told me just to deal with it because I was overweight and she didn't want to do surgery on me. I am going in for a second opinion tomorrow. Will be having the surgery then so I do not have the issues perceed, seeing as I did not know that my gallbladder could rupture and possibly cause me more complications then it is already doing to my life. I thank you for forums like this!
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replied June 29th, 2012
Ruptured gallbladder, surgery, etc.
I'm one week post-op from having my gallbladder removed. Unfortunately, they were not able to remove it laproscopically because it was such a mess, so I had full abdominal surgery complete with staples and a 6-week recovery period.

I've had GB issues for years, tried diet, etc., and was diagnosed with gallstones. I put off having surgery because I felt good ... in between attacks, that is.

In removing the GB last week, the surgeon found a very abnormal, non-functioning organ and sent it for biopsy fearing cancer. Came back not cancerous (thank goodness) but tests showed that it had ruptured at some point in the past which is why it never functioned properly. Even though I have a lot of pain now from the surgery, I'm looking forward to feeling good after I heal. It's been a very long time.

You have to listen to your own gut -- no pun intended -- and if you can't work with one doctor, find another one that you can work with. Remember who the customer is here. Everyone is different in their symptoms and their reactions; there's nothing applicable from one person's pain and another. I love the comments from doctors I've read here about if you had a ruptured GB, you wouldn't be walking around, etc. Well, obviously, mine ruptured at some point, and I've dealt with the issue for years. So who knows?

Take the best care of yourself you can, eat cleanly -- something I've really focused on now -- find the best medical care you can, and move forward. Life's too short to feel crappy!

Marna (CT)
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replied July 24th, 2012
If you are a woman Please read this
Young woman read this : I am a 30 year old woman I am 5'2 i weight 117lbs. I run 3-4 miles 3-5 times a week I eat healthy and I am of Latino/Caucasian descent. These facts are important ,as I have learned that most Dr. base these 3 criteria on if they investigate your gall bladder : I am 2 weeks out from my surgery.I started having pains on a Thursdays. The next day I started feeling a bit lightheaded with throbbing pains too my right side. I would compare these pains to running after drinking too much water. By Friday after noon I was running a fever with intense chills,and the feeling of having convulsions. I thought for sure I was fighting a flu.I couldn't explain why i had pain. I thought once the fever broke I could just sleep it off. Saturday the pain and the fever were still there,except by this time i was vomiting and could not hold any food down. Sunday i finally decided I could not take one more day of feeling dehydrated and realized no matter what I did I could not break the fever. I went to the E.R..Upon the E.R visit I was told that I had a U.T.I ( urinary tract infection that was causing my kidney to try and shut down. I was given antibiotics and pain killers and discharged.As I was preparing to leave the technician checked my temp again only to find that my fever was back to 102.9 ,I was still discharged with instructions to come back if I had a fever or could not keep the meds down..I was back a few hours later. This time when I checked into the E.R a woman Dr. examined me and said there is no way that a U.T.I could cause me this much pain and or a fever that could not be broken...Finally someone who was willing to listen.At this point the pain I had suffered for the last few days was excruciating! Ultra sound testing was down ,my gall bladder was 3 times its size . The Technician performing the test said he could not believe my level of pain tolerance. Sad truth is I have a very high pain tolerance. The E.R Dr.said she couldn't believe that I was able to walk because my vitals were so low. I was then rushed to surgery. My surgeon advised me that if I waited till the morning there was a strong chance that I would not be strong enough for surgery.My recovery has sucked ..I am still very sick after eating. This is strongly because there is a new diet that needs to be learned. I have been successful with white rice that has veggies,spinach salad with homemade oil and vinegar based dressing and tuna sandwiches. Ice cream makes me sick along with most dairy. I have never had gall stones or any gallbladder problems. I was told that I did not fit the criteria. I was not 40,fair,or overweight. Thats perhaps why the first male Dr. was so quick to say urinary infection. I am a mother of 6 (2) sets of twins all c-section ..I have never experienced so much agonizing pain until this ...So woman, as we all have learned time and time again Dr. always want to treat bladder or U.T.I infections rather then investigating what is really going on . Perhaps it takes a rocket scientist to realize that when a woman has an infection, the body tries to flush the infection out through your urine. I strongly recommend that if you are experiencing pain that you know is not a simple U.T.I don't be ignorant like I was. Demand a test!!! After my experience realizing the outcome could have been so much worse, I am outraged that I was excused from the hospital with a very high fever,and in more pain then I had originally arrived with. Please remember if you have a fever that wont go away ,and pain that you can not explain or describe don't wait like I did. The worse the E.R or your Dr. can say is you have a flu..But please seek an expert opinion. If you are without insurance you can go to any local E.R and set up payment arrangements. Life is to important to tamper with ..I will list the sighs that occurred below:
day 1:stomach pain Right lower side( between the top of underwear line to the lower part of my ribs) cramps.
Day 2: fatigue,I felt full of air, stomach pain slowly moving to my back,light headed,nausea , thirsty, by afternoon very high fever with chills and completely weak. Fever went down but never broke, unable to get comfortable.
Day 3: Fever still,pain( moving higher into my chest entire right side of back ) discomfort,constipation,vomiting,hunger ,thirst.
Day 4: diarrhea,fever, pain radiating on the entire right side of body weakness, fatigue , vomiting , headache. Pain medication Morphine did not take the pain away ,only took the edge off, and I was given pain meds through I.V every 30-45 min through the I.V and discharged
Day 5: all the symptoms listed above ,only difference I finally had an answer. -
I hope that this will be useful. I appreciate any and all feedback or tips that you may have for me as to what luck others have had with eating...God Bless all of you, and much luck to anyone reading this seeking advise. I hope this can be very useful.
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replied October 20th, 2012
Four days ago on the day of my consultation with a gastrointestinal surgeon regarding sludge and stones in my gall bladder I had emergency gall bladder removal done laparoscopically the same day - my only symptoms were severe nausea,a constant itch on my right back side on my bra line (which I had for years)and severe low back pain in the morning. This back pain would ease up once I got up and moved around. I just thought I had the flu. The low back pain I contributed to my job or just body aches from the flu. My gall bladder was ready to burst so I am thankful for my family doctor and his willingness to work with me on this. However, even if you don't have the classic symptoms of pain in your mid/lower rib cage it doesn't hurt to have an ultrasound of your gall bladder. I had to take my own health into my own hands after many visits to the ER in the past 5 years which now I look back to see they mostly likely were related to gall bladder issues. Even if just one time you have severe pain shooting into your right shoulder after eating a meal it is important you get your gall bladder checked. I believe I have suffered needlessly for decades and if I would have gone to the ER or my doctor right away after the first time I had severe pain shooting into my shoulder I may have not had to suffer for so long. I hope this helps anyone suffering at this time. God Bless!
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replied October 20th, 2012
Burst gallbladder not necessarily obvious
I had emergency gallbladder removal two weeks ago. I'm so glad to read a few similar stories here, since my surgery was far more complicated than the normal outpatient surgery I keep hearing about. I wish none of us had to go through this, but I'm glad I'm not the only one!

I'm 37, female, Caucasian, somewhat overweight (BMI 2Cool, and my first trouble was only three weeks ago. By the time they removed my gallbladder, it had ruptured and was "gangrenous," according to the pathology report. I was in a great deal of pain, but not as much as doctors seemed to expect. On my first two ER visits--during gallstone episodes with intense pain focused mainly in my lower back--I was misdiagnosed with "back strain," despite also having a low-grade fever, some abdominal pain and nausea. The doctors sent me home with pain pills (by the way, Vicodin has absolutely no effect on the pain of gallstones).

My sister is a doctor and after a couple minutes on the phone with her, she knew it was either gallbladder disease or appendicitis and she convinced me to go to another ER. By this point, just 8 days after the first attack and 1 day after the second, my gallbladder may already have ruptured. The symptoms were moderate rather than severe: I had a low-grade fever, no appetite--hence not really any nausea--and lots of abdominal pain, particularly under my right lower rib. My organs felt like they were all inflamed and banging into each other whenever we hit a speed bump in the car driving to the ER. But I could walk and talk, which I couldn't really do during the attacks of gallstone pain.

This time, at another hospital, the ER doctor recognized it was serious and immediately hospitalized me. I was in the hospital for four nights--one to stabilize me before surgery, and three to recover from the infection and the surgery. My fever didn't break till two days after surgery and I was wearing a drain for ten days after surgery to clear out as much of the infection as possible.

Still, the surgeon said he was surprised at what bad shape my gallbladder was in when he removed it. I think many of us, even doctors, assume that "burst gallbladder" must be unbearably painful, and immediately cause dire consequences. But at that point I had less pain that during the gallstone attacks and the fever was still mild. The main indication I had of serious illness was that I felt very weak and exhausted.

The doctors who originally misdiagnosed me didn't seem to believe that my pain was severe, or maybe they didn't realize that gallbladder pain is sometimes focused in the lower back. They also dismissed the fact that I had a low-grade fever, and when I said I wasn't vomiting they didn't take my nausea seriously. So we all need to know what's normal for our own body and keep looking for help if we're sure there's something wrong.

Don't count on a "burst gallbladder" being obvious--my surgeon, who did a great job in the surgery, admitted that it's hard to figure out much about the gallbladder from scans. He didn't know it was that "sick" until he saw it for himself.

I'm lucky not to have gotten septicemia, to have spent only 4 days in the hospital, and to have a good surgeon, but I worry about how hard it sometimes is for doctors to diagnose gallbladder trouble. What the heck is up with that? Good health, everyone!
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replied January 10th, 2013
Hi guys, I had a recent attack last weekend. I forgot to take Lecithin Sad(( Did you guys pass gas a lot when the gall bladder ruptured, not during the hospital visit but the time you suspect it began to rupture and days/time after that?

Thank you so much
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replied January 11th, 2013
Sorry about your gallstone attack! I didn't have any gas. I think my digestive system had pretty much shut down because of the pain and infection. But gallbladder problems appear to present in a variety of ways--different symptoms for different people. My sister just treated an elderly man with a ruptured gallbladder who was originally diagnosed in the ER with pneumonia, of all things.

If you suspect a rupture, ask a doctor. If you're experiencing a pain that is new to you, something unusual that worries you, tell a doctor that this is something new and unusual. That should get their attention.

It's impossible for a doctor to know if it's ruptured without doing surgery, but they CAN figure out if your body is fighting something bad by doing a quick blood test (complete blood count--looks for white blood cells that fight infection). I hope you feel better soon!
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replied January 15th, 2013
Hello again Ms. Odessa, I just checked my temp, the highest value went up to 99.2F at rest, lowest is 98.8F under the tongue. My normal temp is 98.6-.7F

Is this low grade fever?
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replied January 14th, 2013
Dear Ms. OdessaJones thank you so much for responding. You have no idea how much this means :'(

It's been 8 days now since that attack, I guess I am still alive. No pain at all except for mild discomfort in the lower right back after long hours of laying down, not sure yet if this is connected.

The passing gas I guess is from the fiber I've been taking after all. I keep taking olive oil + lecithin + fiber every time I eat something with saturated fat.

Gosh I've been a healthy person, I believe this was from following a Paleo diet I started 2 yrs ago. I should have not gone to that route sigh.

I will ask for a CBC test and also get my temp. Thank you so much!!! Please keep me in your thoughts Sad
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