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Osteochondroma vs. Osteosarcoma (Page 1)

I have a five year old who was diagnosed with an osteochondroma on his right knee a little over a year and a half ago. We called our dr. on a Friday evening as he had been limping for a few days and complaining of severe pain. He met us at the emergency room at 7am the next morning. We had an xray done and he then referred us pictures in hand to an orthopaedic surgeon. This surgeon reviewed the xrays and said it was just an osteochondroma and that we shouldn't worry. We would just watch and see how it grew and that it would be removed before it became problematic. It has grown and he has been complaining of pain again off and on for the past few months. I am beginning to worry as last week I received a call from his teacher saying that he seemed to be having trouble writing. I questioned him on this and he said it was hard because his arm hurt. I asked him to describe the pain and he said it was like the pain in his leg. I need some advice. Everything I have read says that osteochondromas are very rare in children under 10. I also feel that some other form of testing should have been done. I heard the news I wanted to hear, so I never second guessed them, but now I feel I should have. I called to make a follow up appointment, but he cannot be seen for several months. Has anyone dealt with osteochondromas and more importantly a misdiagnosis of osteochondroma. I have tried to find another orthopaedic, but none in a 50 mile radius will see a child as young as him. I am frightened and don't know what to do.
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First Helper sharon4402
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replied February 8th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
Hi!
Osteochondroma is the most common bone tumor in kids and it can be manifested as solitary or multiple tumor. There is a some percent of possible malignant transformation.
Has this mass rapidly increased in size?
Is your son with short stature?
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replied August 14th, 2008
Update
Can you give me an update with what ended happening in your situation? I have a son in the same situation. He has been limping for over a year, diagnosed with the osteochondroma last March and told to wait. It has gotten worse over the summer. More limping and even screaming during our vacation two weeks ago. My pediatrician gave me a name of a pediatric surgeon, 40 miles away and another 3 hour drive away. So, I will see what happens next week. He just turned 4. If you can give me an update on you situation that would be great. Any info is helpful.
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replied January 9th, 2009
osteochondromas
Hi, I hope that I can help. My 13 year old son was diagnosed about 5 years ago. We took him to our ortho-surgeon upon the advice from our family Doctor. The surgeon decided to go in and do surgery and never once reffered us to a pediatric ortho. We then took him to a larger city and to a specialist and he told us that he would not touch him because he really needed to see a pedi ortho. The Osteochondromas can become very painful and can cause deforming of the bones. If he is having pain you should not wait another several months. We are currently taking our son to Shriners hospital for children in Shrevport, LA. I don't know where you live or if you have a shriners hospital around you but, they are wonderful. They have been very helpful. If you are not able to get him there they can provide away. What ever means possible. I hope that your child gets to feeling better and should you have any other questions that I can help you with please let me know.
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replied April 24th, 2009
hi
if this helps you any, I was diagnosed with osteochondroma when I was four and I've been treated four the last 17 years at shriners hospital to remove them. The chance of an osteochondroma turning into an osteosarchoma is less than one percent, most people notice it after they stop growing. On a darker note, a recent study was done on children who have osteochondromas and it was found that many of them had an osteochondroma in their spinal canals, myself included. Although the tumor it's self is not life-threatening, it could compress the spinal cord or if the neck suffers some kind of trauma, it could cause the individual to become paralyzed depending on the position and size of the tumor.
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replied June 5th, 2009
My son (13)was diagnosed with this a couple of months ago. We noticed it because he had this large "lump" on the side of his leg. It is about 4 inches above the ankle. The xrays showed a 2"x1" growth on his tibia pushing against his fibula, which is now bent(this is what was causing the "lump"). We took him to a ped ortho dr who said to do nothing!!! We went back to my ankle/foot dr who was amazed, to say the least. He agreed to do the surgery next week. He has since discussed his case with several other doctors who all agree that this needs to be removed so that it does not keep growing which can break the fibula. It is not on his growth plate. I have an xray if anyone would like to see it, I can email it.
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replied January 2nd, 2012
I would love to see the xray. I just left the doctor office with my son and we are waiting to hear from the radiologist and the pediatric orthopedist. I can use any advise.
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replied January 2nd, 2012
ochondroma
this sounds just like my son he had it same spot and everythang had it removed in jan 2011 and in dec 2011 but he is 5 years old
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replied May 22nd, 2012
Osteochondromas
To any of you that need information on osteochondromas, I would be happy to give any information that I know. I am a 30 year old female and I have already had 4 surgeries throughout my life to remove them, the first one was when I was 13 and the most recent was done in 2009, I have looked up plenty of info and talked to numerous ortho surgeons to get all opinions. I personally think it should be take. Serious and treated ASAP! I now have a permanent limp because of it. Please contact me , I hope I can give help and info to any of you who need it Smile
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replied May 24th, 2012
Need Help
Yes!! I do need information...thank you!!! As my daughter is 8 & had one chondroma 1 1/2 years ago. Then all of a sudden developed 8 more that we could see and feel.. and now three fingers have them as well. I have seen a orthoped surgeon & she says its too risky to do surgery & to just try to pain management. I feel completely useless. If you could, maybe you could call me collect. We live in Alberta Canada & my name is Dee & our home phone number is 780-369-3146. I would love to get some ideas from you as what I should be asking & doing going forward.
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replied June 7th, 2012
Osteochondroma
My daughter has been in severe pain and was just diagnosed with one on her knee. The dr is making it seem like its no big deal but Im so worried about it. Please contact me, I'd love to hear what you think.
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replied June 13th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
AmySilva,

While osteochondromas are benign tumors, they can cause discomfort in the soft tissues overlying them. The bone tumor itself rarely ever causes pain, but it is common for the soft tissues (such as muscles, tendons, nerves, etc) over the mass to become traumatized and painful.

If an osteochondroma is not causing any problems, there is no real reason to have it removed. But, if the patient is having pain from the soft tissues snapping or rubbing over the mass, then removal is usually warranted.

It is usually recommended that the surgery be delayed till the patient is skeletally mature. This is to reduce the chances of the mass returning and also so as not to affect the child’s growth.

These tumors are basically just the normal growth plate, which has become lost and is producing bone in the wrong place. What happens, is a small nest of growth plate cartilage cells gets left behind was the bone grows in length. These cells continue to do what they are designed to do, make bone. So, a small stalk of bone in made on the side of the long bone. It often looks like a mushroom. On the end of the stalk is a cartilage cap. It is this cartilage cap that can very rarely transform into a malignant tumor later in life. In an adult who has an osteochondroma, development of pain in a previously nontender mass or an increase in the size of the mass after skeletal maturity, is cause to have the mass evaluated for malignant transformation. But, again, this is a very rare occurrence.

So, again, if the mass is causing significant problems, then it may have to be removed before skeletal maturity. It is a surgical procedure, and carries the same risks as any other surgery. Specific risks of this surgery include; recurrence of the tumor, disturbances of normal growth, fracture of the bone when removing the tumor, and failure to take the pain away.

So, if you are concerned about the mass, discuss it again with your daughter’s surgeon. If you are considering surgical intervention, you need to weigh the risks/complications with the possible benefits, and what the outcomes can be.

Again, just because there is a mass, does not mean that it has to be treated. But, if it is causing problems, then treatment may be warranted.

Good luck. Hope your daughter is doing okay.
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replied February 13th, 2013
hey im currently 17 and i was diagnosed with osteochondromas when i was about 7 years old. I went to the doctor and they said it was that. They told us i didnt need to get rid of it so we didnt. I went for several years. I stopped going because my Tumor which was once very pointy and obvious some how seemed to round out and get smaller. I didnt chip it off or anything. The doctor said that i didnt need to come in any more which he said when i was about 14. Still this day i still have the tumor. Lately it keeps causing a dull pain through out my leg and i can never tell where its coming from. sometimes it feels like my knee where the tumor is or even lower. Is this normal? I also have a history of cancer in my family. My mom died last year from breast cancer. The thing that scares me though is that she found out the cancer came back when a tumor broke her right humerous in half. Is it possible my tumor could turn cancerous especially with that in my family? please text me im really worried 941 720 4155
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replied October 9th, 2009
My only son is having that problem, his is all over the body Multiple Osteochondrosis he had surgery on his both arms already. Right now he is 11 years old he had some bumps but it's not hurting... yet, his height is still normal. They say it is hereditary, in his case is different me and my wife's family does not have any bone problems. The only thing I can think that causes my sons problem is exposure to x ray radiation, my wife is operating room nurse, the possibility that she was exposed to radiation when she was pregnant was too high. X ray radiation damaged my sons genes that causes his bone problems. For people with knowledge about x ray and radiation, is it possible that, what I am thinking is right?
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replied November 12th, 2009
hi i have osteochondroma it is hereditary i got it from my moms side my mom also has it. You can learn alot on the internet but more from the doctor i think what you should do is to find a like a bone doctor i already had one bone spur removed but you can't remove all of them because they grow back and the more you remove them they are cancerous so it is something your son will have to live with. I am 18 years old and i was born with it for the pain have him take Tylenol or ibuprofen well something for the pain. the tumor will grow as he grows but i just thought i would let you know about it from someone who has it. I hope that i helped you.
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replied November 17th, 2009
Osteochondroma
Hi,

My daughter is 13 and we have found a osteochondroma at the top of her femur in between her leg and pelvis (just below her hip socket)which in turn has deformed her hip socket and the ball of her femur, the pediatric ortho surgeon said she has probably had it about 10 years but has never seen it in that spot. We have had an MRI because he thinks its about the size of a tennis ball. We go back tomorrow for results on what they are going to do next.

Anyone got some advice on what we probably should do?

Its a pretty scary thought to think that she might have to have a reconstruction of the top of her femur as it looks like a stump.
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replied December 18th, 2009
my 12 year old daughter has been having knee pain for about 6 months we thought it was growing pains but I took her to a ortho dr in october they did xrays and noticed a growth coming off of the inside of knee, they put her in phyiscal therapy for 4 weeks and then decided to do an MRI they said the growth is osteochondroma and put her back in therapy for another 4 weeks, she just finished that today however the therapist says that she is not getting any better she favors her knee and it is causing her hip to rotate.

the reason I am writing is to see if I am being a paranoid mom because the only thing I am thinking is a misdiagnosis and that it is actually cancer, is it possible for them to misdiagnos cancer for osteochondroma, the dr wants her to come back in 6 months for a repeat xray I am afraid that if we do wait 6 months that it could be worse. should I get a second opininon?
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replied September 13th, 2011
osteochondroma
Hi I am really sorry to hear about your daughter. What ever happened? Did you get a second opinion? My son, 8 years old, just got diagnosed with osteochondroma this evening.
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replied June 13th, 2012
Tayler 10 Osteochonroma femur
My daughter is now 10 years old. We found the lump right above her right knee about a year ago when rubbing her legs because she was having pain. I thought for a long time that it was "growing pains". Working in the medical field I brought her that day to a physician that said it was too hard for a lipoma (fatty tissue) just get an xray to confirm it is NOT attached to the bone but it was. Waiting to go to Childrens Hospital in San Diego seemed forever and anyone that I talked to and showed the x-ray did not want to comment. When we finally got to the specialist I really do not know what he said. All I knew was it was not emergent and my worst fears went away. A day later I felt even more confused and just like alot of comments on here I felt that I needed more information. I saw another physician about 1 year later that told me this is a common bone tumor and we will just monitor. Yesterday I returned because my daughter had to stop volleyball. She was in pain every day. What really bothered me is that I realized she was not walking straight. When the physician looked at again he actaully had big eyes was amazed at the growth. I am not going to a Pediatic Surgeon in a week. I definitley want it removed. I am not waiting for it to cause other damage or deformity. I was told to wait until at least a year after starting her period because she is still growing and the tumor may come back but it is growing too fast. I will post after her appt with Pediatric Ortho.
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replied June 13th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
1lovedave,

It is not uncommon for osteochondromas to enlarge during a child's growth spurt, since they are basically just normal growth plate cells, producing bone. It is just in the wrong place.

Osteochondromas can be quite impressive on x-ray, and to anyone who is not familiar with them, they can cause some uneasy feelings. But, again, they are a benign mass.


It is usually recommended for the mass to not be removed till the child has reached skeletal maturity. One reason is that the rate of recurrence is higher, but also because the surgeon does not want to cause problems with the child's growth and development.

But, if the mass is in a location, such that the soft tissues overlying it are constantly being traumatized and hurting, then earlier intervention may be warranted.


That is something to discuss with the surgeon. Be sure to get all of the risks/complications, the benefits, and possible outcomes of all of the possible treatment options.

It can be quite an undertaking to get these masses out sometimes. It is a significant orthopedic surgery. It is necessary to chisel the tumor off of the shaft of the bone, after dissecting all of the soft tissues away from it. Many times, the patient will develop a bursa over the tip of the tumor, which can become inflamed from the soft tissues snapping over the mass. The bursa also has to be removed. So, it is a lot of moving tissues around, to expose the mass, then removing the mass.

Bone also is very vascular; it has a large blood supply, so there can be significant bleeding from the raw exposed area. Usually not enough to need a transfusion, but enough to cause some bruising around the surgical site. Sometimes, the resulting bruise can be quite impressive, and distressing to someone not warned about it ahead of time. In the soft tissues, blood vessels can be tied off and/or cauterized, but it is hard to stop the exposed bone from bleeding after the tumor is removed.

Your daughter will have a scar, which will be there for the rest of her life. The scar may increase in size, if she has a lot of growing left to do. Most patients do not have any problems with the scar, if the surgery is successful in removing the discomfort. But, some young ladies do get a little bent out of shape over a scar (some young men do also). Again, something that the young lady needs to know before the surgery.


Again, if the mass is causing significant problems, it should probably be removed. Just be sure to know everything you can about it, before the surgery. Surgery cannot be undone, it is permanent.


Good luck. Hope your daughter gets this taken care of so she can return to the activities she likes to do.
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replied January 8th, 2010
My 5 year old boy was diagnosed today!
My 5 year old son was just diagnosed today. We have a bone scan on in 12 days, follow-up in 14 days. We only found the lump on the inside of his right knee on Sunday (today is Friday). The Ped. Ortho. Surgeon saw him today for the first time saying since it is so rare in children as young as my son, she wanted to check his entire body. If they think anything over 2cm in adults could be cancerous why not in children?

My son has had no pain yet but since it is already 3cm wide and 1 cm deep, they want to act quickly. He had nothing visible in June when he has his check-up. I noticed it myself when we were cuddling because he was since with tonsilitis.

After the pain from the tonsils, how do you explain to a 5 year old he is going to go through a bone scan and surgery in a minimum of 1 spots on his body.

I could not believe how fast they were moving on this, but they do not want it to affect his growth and activity level (he is a very active little boy). Maybe it is because I am in Canada and I am not sure!

Any advise could be greatly appreciated.
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replied October 27th, 2011
Hi, I am in Alberta & they have said the same thing to us. A year ago my daughter who was age 7 at the time was diagnosed with Osteochrondroma in right wrist. It wasn't hard to miss as you can definately see it. We go every year to the specialist for a follow-up. They told us not to worry and if she complains of pain and/or it grows to bring her back. 4 months ago I found another on the long bone of her other arm. Got an x-ray & it was confirmed. Still I'm to watch for pain & growth. Last night I found another one on the inside of the right knee which feels quite big. She goes to GP/doc tomorrow so I can get yet again another x-ray to confirm. This is really crazy to me as we can find nobody in the family with this condition. I think I will ask to go back to Stollery for another specialist appointment to yet again relenquish my fears. I understand that it is extremely rare for them to become malignant but as a mom I worry all the time. This one on the knee seems to be 3cm x 1 1/2 deep is my best guess.
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replied October 27th, 2011
Especially eHealthy
Mac,

Your daughter may have a different condition from the solitary osteochondroma. Multiple ostochondromas (HMO) are treated much differently from the single lesion variety.

Though the multiple ones are often hereditary, there are cases where it is not. But, it may take a genetic evaluation.

Children with HMO often have problems with bone deformity and joint problems from their lesions. Your daughter should be seen by a pediatric orthopedist for an evaluation. She may even need a skeletal survey to see how many growths she actually has. A thorough orthopedic examination will pick up most, but some of the small ones can get missed.

Good luck.
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replied October 28th, 2011
I agree about the 'skeletal survey'. Not enough literature about the HMO as I have no idea if it can skip 2 or 3 generations? As my husband & I do not and have not had this condition. As for the one in her wrist, you are right-it has caused the arm bone on the other side to stop growing. Nobody knows yet why it happens that way, and they say it could be the chrondroma that causes the other bone to fall behind in growth, or they think it could be the other bone which isn't growing to cause the chrondroma. Very puzzling indeed. They don't as of yet want to do surgury because they are worried that if they do they may be doing more harm than good because of the nerves/tendons. I do know that I have read the research, and it states that the more osteo chrondromas there are, the percentage goes up with regards to the the tumors changing to malignant. Is this also your understanding? Also, does it mean anything when two new ones are found within 4-5 months? Or does timing matter? We see a specialist every 12 months for evaluation but because we have multiple it might be best to have it evaluated. Thank you for your time and some clarity(:
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replied October 28th, 2011
Especially eHealthy
Mac,

As to the heredity part, there are cases of spontaneous mutations occuring. So a patient can have the disease without having any known relative with the disorder. It is just easy to peg a diagnosis, if there is a hereditary component.

The osteochondroms, of course, come off of the growth plate. They form when a small nest of epiphyseal cells gets left behind, as the bone grows in length. Then, because these cells are programmed to grow new bone, they start an offshoot of bone. Since the growth plate has cartilage within it, the osteochondroma is capped with a cartilage rim. Thus the name osteo (bone) chondro (cartilage) oma (tumor).


When the lesion are on the lower leg or forearm, where the two bones are in such close proximaity to each other, their presence can put pressure on the soft growing bones, causing them to deform. And since the osteochondromas arise from the growth plate, they can cause problems in that location, resulting in decreased growth or even cessation of growth.

Operating on the lesions while the child is still growing always presents difficulties. The surgeon does not want to damage the growth plate. The lesions often distort the normal anatomy, placing neurovascular structures at higher risk. The lesions have a higher pepensity to recur if taken out too early, also.


In terms of the malignancy, the more growths one has, the more chances of one becoming malignant is, of course, higher. But, usually, if malignancy occurs, it is later in adulthood, rather than in childhood. That is not to say childhood malignancies don't occur, they do, but they are rare. Malignant transformation is rare in itself, also.

Signs that a lesion may be tranforming is a change in character of a previously stable lesion. A previously static lesion that starts increasing in size, after skeletal maturity or developing pain in a tumor that previously has painless, are two of the more common sizes.

What makes the difference between an osteochondroma (benign) and a chondrosarcoma (malignant) is the size of the cartilage cap over the bony stalk. Besides other radiographic and pathologic characteristics.

Again, it is unusual for an osteochondroma to undergo malignant transformation and if it does occur, it usually occurs in adulthood. But, there are rare cases in childhood, which is why pediatric orthopedic surgeons advise patients to have regular follow ups and to contact them if a lesion changes in character.


Hope your daughter does well in the future.
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replied October 29th, 2011
Thank you so much for the extra information. as I have been trying to do my own research & you put it in words that I can comprehend..lol.
We did have the one by the knee looked at by our family doctor yesturday. Again, he said the same thing you did about malignancy occuring being extremely rare.
It will be interesting to see what radiologist says about this one as, as I was watching the x-ray pictures load they looked quite different to me than the other ones she has had x-rayed. On the other x-rays you can see the outline of chrondromas. In fact, you couldn't miss them. This last one I couldn't make out where it was as where it should have been looked so dark and no defined outline. Yet you can see it on the side of her knee when she was standing and could definately feel it as it isn't small. Interesting....hence I asked for another appointment with specialist. She may tell me the same thing..."Not to worry" but atleast it gives me peace of mind. Again thank you so much for your help. You sound very informed & very up to date on this condition.(:
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replied April 18th, 2012
osteochondroma diagnosed in 2 year old
hi there,
Just under a year ago my now 2.5yr old son diagnosed with an osteochonroma on his left scapular. We noticed it as it is quite a hard sharp lump. We have had two opinions and both have been quite confliting, which for a neurotic mum is very confusing. One top london consultant told us that a follow up was necessary in a year, one told us they wanted to follow up in 3 months. The lump measures approx 3cms and has grown a 1mm in the last year. What i was hoping you could clarify for me as again both doctors have said different things, is whether this is very rare in a child or his age? and also in today's scan he said that it hurt and it definitely seems to be slightly tender, although the scan showed only 1mm change and a minimal cartilage cap. Please let me know your thoughts as i am sick with worry all the time. I wish and hope everyone on this site well as this is horrid for our poor little ones!
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replied May 12th, 2012
I have two sons with osteochondroma or mhe. They were both diagnosed before their first birthdays. As the kids grow the osteochondroma grow also since many of them are located along growth plates. Many doctors won't remove these growths before the kids are close to done growning since it can cause growth problems if taken out too soon. At times both of my sons osteochondromas have caused them pain since the bones can get caught on tendons or muscles. Many times the dr's just watch the growths unless they cause problems, not all osteochondromas need to be removed. My oldest son has had three osteochondromas removed and will have four more removed next week. We take our boys to Shriners and they have had excellent care. Keep a close eye on the growth of the osteochondromas since they can cause uneven growth of the arms, legs, fingers ect. This is a rare disease that can cause a lot of problems, but it can be fixed. My sons have lead normal lives and if anything the mhe had made them more compassionate and mature then other kids their ages. Good luck with your son!
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replied May 24th, 2012
Hi Wendyc12,
Could I please ask where you are in Canada as we are in Alberta & my daughter had one 1 1/2 ago & the count is now close to 12 & those are the ones that are bigger. She is in a lot of pain & we too have been to a surgeon & they want to watch to see if there is more growth. We just want a second opinion & don't know where to look.
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replied January 25th, 2010
My three year old diagnosed
My son is four years old and was diagnosed with osteochondroma shortly after his third birthday. I have heard thus far that he is the youngest known child to have the disease. His first tumor was discovered after he sprained his knee. He had never complained of an trouble with his knee. After his first surgery last year his knee pain has been consistant and his knee has been unusually swollen. He had since had another tumor removed on the opposite side of the knee and is presently awaiting his third surgery. Every Dr. I have taken him to in three states has had different theories and opinions. I've heard that the best idea would be replacing his knee, but his leg will be unable to grow correctly. I've also been told that at anytime these tumors can be malignant. I am wondering what hospitals and what Dr's any of you would recommend to get some answers. Thanks so much.
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replied April 21st, 2010
Osteochondroma (knee)
My son was diagnosed with an osteochondroma just above his right knee at 10 years of age. Apparently, it had been there all along. I have several friends who are orthopeds and they all referred me to a pediatric orthopedic. (They saw his xrays and agreed with the ped ortho''s diagnosis and treatment.) My ped. ortho wanted to wait until my son was done growing because it was close to his growth plate. As my son grows, it grows with him. He recommended waiting until he was full grown to have it removed, unless it became painful. My son has grown about 6 inches (now 12 yrs old) since diagnosed and it has now become painful. His ped ortho recommended removing it now, because it is quite large and the pain will only worsen as he continues to grow. His surgery is to be outpatient, off feet for two days, and no contact activity for 3-4 weeks. Was told 1% of tumors become cancerous if left alone.

TISHARRY-
PT will not help with the pain. Your daughter''s muscles are going to continue to rub against the tumor causing the pain. I would definitely go to another pediatric orthoped for a second opinion! I have been reassured by several orthos that only 1% becomes cancerous.
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replied April 24th, 2010
I Had an osteochodroma - OUCH
I am 46 year old woman and had a HUGE osteochodroma removed from my femur when I was 22 years old. I can only share that it was very hard to get a diagnosis of diffuse pain and odd nerve sensations that grew over several years. I was so thrilled to have a diagnosis I did not spend one minute worrying about cancer.

This is your child, so I won't tell you not to worry. But a 1% chance of cancer is almost nothing.

In my case it hurt A LOT and it was hard to get any Dr to take it seriously. I don't think I even knew how much it hurt until it was removed. If it were my child and it hurt, I would have it removed.

As far as leg length goes. I was clearly done growing when it was removed and I have a 3/4 inch shorter leg - so - I am a sample of one where it probably contributed to a shorter leg.
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replied June 18th, 2010
multiple osteochondromas
i am 16 and i was diagosed when i was 5years old. I had multiple osteochondroma in both elbows and a few years ago i found out i had multipe of them in my right knee and lower leg. I havent had them removed but i go to an orthopoedic surgeon. they only hurt occasionally and none of them are cancerous lucky for me. my surgeon doesnt want to remove them Sad
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replied August 3rd, 2010
rib osteochondroma
My 3 year old daughter was recently diagnosed with an osteochondroma on her 6th right rib. She had an x-ray and then a ct scan. I was told it was very benign. I still have questions and I am in process of finding out the answers. Has anyone had osteochondromas on a rib? It is a "boney" lump on her rib. I found it a couple of months ago. I am wondering what Dr I can go to for a second opinion - to make sure she is ok. Any info will help.
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replied February 21st, 2012
osteochondroma of rib
our son was diagnosed with an osteochondroma on his seventh rib (left side) just before his third bday- we go to an ortho surgeon practice, but are now seeing a tumor and bone specialist within the group at morgan stanley childrens hospital in nyc
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replied August 14th, 2010
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger
Hello,
I am a 31 year old woman who was born with osteochondromas. While it was painful growing up, I feel that I have been capable of doing normal activities. During my life I have been an EMT, dancer, learned Tai Chi, and have had 2 beautiful kids. I am considerably shorter than the rest of my family, but I am ok with it. There are days when my legs and back hurt (I have tumors in pretty much every joint/bone in my body, including my spine), but I lead a relatively normal life. My condition has only made me a stronger person. I hope this can give some hope to parents or youth who have had to deal with osteochondromas.
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replied September 29th, 2010
hi

my son was diagnosed with osteochondroma when he was 1 nearly 2 after I found a lump on his right leg just above his ankle. The doctors don't seem worried about it they want 2 x-ray it every 6months. But I'm worried as his mussel is also growing over the top of it which is causing it 2 stretch. should I get it checked by another doc or get further help?
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replied October 6th, 2010
is it osteosarcoma
My daughter is now 5 but has complained of knee pain for the past at least two years. Sometimes she wakes up crying from pain. Xrays over a year ago showed nothing but I still worry. It seems to be worse at night and after a lot of outdoor play. Has anyone experienced this? I mean does this sound like osteosarcoma?
Thank you!
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replied September 26th, 2011
Hi,

My son had the same symptoms. Very painful at around 2am every night. All the doctors said it was growing pains but I knew it was something else. After requesting tests he had a isotope bone scan that revelead a tiny benign tumour the size of a pea. It is called an osteoid Osteoma. It is benign and they eventually go after several years although they operated on my son because it was so painful. He had radiation and we think this has caused a osteochondroma on the same leg growing around his growth plate. Now we are in the same position having to go to an orthopaedica surgeon to see if it needs to be removed. The best thing you can do is go the specialist and have scans done. In retrospect I would not have had any radiation done on my son as he was only ten. Radiation at any level can damage healthy cells.
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replied October 13th, 2010
Osteochondroma
Hi
I had an osteochondroma when i was 12. I was very atheletic and notice a painful lump in my right knee. I went to the doctors and they told me it was a osteochondroma. A few months later i have surgery to remove it. All went well and i had no trouble with it after. I am now 21 and i think it has come back. I am a female and was told that it was not as common in females. Is it possible that it can come back????

Thank You
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replied May 16th, 2012
Can they come back??
Yes, there is about a 5% chance they can come back is what our orthopedist told us. Go have it checked out just to make sure.
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