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Chest pain only while running (Page 1)

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Hey. I'm 20, male. I regularly run on an elliptical and occasionally a stationary bike, and in the warmer months I use my bike very frequently as transportation. What I rarely do is run on pavement for exercise.

On those occasions I do, I notice that very soon after beginning I get chest pains. It originates in the center of my chest, and my throat tightens and it becomes a little difficult to breathe. Even after stopping it lasts, though gradually decreasing in intensity, for 30min+.

Like I said, I go to the gym, sometimes up to five times a week. I run on an elliptical anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour. I'm not at all unaccustomed to cardiovascular exercise, and if the heart meters are to be trusted at my gym my heart rate can get up to 180 without experiencing even the slightest hint of this pain.

I've thought maybe the fact that, if I do run, it's usually because it's a little late and I don't feel like heading out to the gym, and for that reason it tends to be cool outside. But then again, I ride my bicycle at night occasionally, albeit it's still winter so it's colder than usual here (CA). I don't know if cold air could have anything to do with it.

Thanks so much for any replies.
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First Helper User Profile Artour
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replied March 11th, 2008
Experienced User
Running on pavement is much more tiring than on the elliptical since although the cardio work is the same, ur legs are taking a lot more impact, but still, you shouldn't be getting chest pains
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replied April 2nd, 2008
I seem to be experiencing nearly the same thing... I'm 26, female, and have always been very active. Though when I run, I get chest pains, without fail. It continues 30 or so minutes after I stop, and sometimes I develop a cough the day after I run. Its worse in cold weather, but there in warm as well. Its been like this for years!

Everyone tells me I just have to tough it out and make it through getting started... but that doesn't seem to really work. hm.

Nick have you seen any improvement?
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replied April 26th, 2012
Hi Nick and Nalag22 I have the same symptoms and found out I have a hiatal hernia. (also tested for heart problems but could not find anything) IF you ever find any treatment for this, please let me know!
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replied April 5th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
Check your breathing. You may not be breathing properly while running. Be sure you are inhaling through your nose and exhaling through your mouth. You may need to really focus and think about it for awhile during your run but it will become second nature to you after some practice. My 19 year old son was having similar experiences with chest pain. I told him to really watch his breathing and now he runs without chest pain. The pain is related to CO2 levels.

If you continue to experience any pain you should consult a cardiologist for a stress test and ekg.
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replied May 7th, 2011
I agree.
If you don't breathe properly you create additional pressure on heart and lungs when you don't control level of CO2.
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replied April 18th, 2012
Im actually at a gym right now and experienced chest pain right in the middle and started having trouble breathing as well. Im 22 and female and quite active and wanted to see if there were others out there. I will have to work on my breathing and hope it helps, thanks.
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replied April 14th, 2008
Active User, very eHealthy
Breathing or not, I don't see how that is correlated with this chest pain, oxygen deficiency would probably cause these posters to produce lactic acid and prevent them from running for a long duration anyway. If they were poorly breathing, the original poster probably wouldn't have been able to run for 30+ minutes anyway.

Go to the doctor, there are way too many explanations for that. Clotting of the Arteries or Veins for instance, can cause this chest pain, because of the difficulty of blood flow with increased blood pressure from cardiovascular exercises. That is but one of the explanation.
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replied April 7th, 2009
i hav the same problem
i think it is to do with the cold air, some years ago i was staying in a warm country n i never had this problem and now am in UK n whenever i run i have a chest pain as explained by nick exactly the same way..n i havent found any cure for it...did u find any thg nick...thnks
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replied April 16th, 2012
i dont think that the chest pain has anything to do with the temperature...
im an 18 year old female who lives in hawaii and i had this same problem since i was young...
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replied April 16th, 2012
i dont think that the chest pain has anything to do with the temperature...
im an 18 year old female who lives in hawaii and i had this same problem since i was young...
and for the record, i was very active...i was a swimmer, BMXer, and i did keiki triathlons
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replied May 12th, 2009
chest pain
i suffer the same thing i do alot of training and the past 8 month i have not been able to train because of a severe deep pain starts in the middle of my chest ive been to the hospital 3 times they say its got nothing to do the the heart its muscle problems but it just wont go away does anyone have any ideas ?
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replied October 27th, 2009
Hello,

If you experience chest pain during an exercise, you should report this to your doctor. The doctor will likely check your blood pressure, cholesterol levels, ask you questions about your heart and perform other steps needed to diagnose angina. Other possibilities are the cold air (which constricts your arteries), and indigestion.
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replied November 1st, 2009
I have experienced pain in the center of my chest while jogging as well. I am 24 and I just went to the doctor to get my blood pressure and cholesterol levels taken and everything is normal. I got an EKG and a sonagram of the heart and the results were great. This chest pain occurs ONLY when I jog. Not when I bike, not when I climb stairs etc. only when I jog or run for an extended period of time. What a mystery this is...
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replied June 11th, 2012
I have the exact same problem and can't even jog for 1/4 mile before the pain starts. I am confounded by this and am looking for answers. Heart and lungs checked out fine.
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replied November 11th, 2009
I am 20 years old, i don't exersice alot but i would think i am in a little lower then average shape, little over weight, whenever i start jogging after about 10 mins in i get a pain right to the right of where my heart would be its bothering me too idk what to do
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replied May 25th, 2013
Im 23 and I have the same problem. I'm not overweight, but Im not in fantastic shape, and every time I run I get a pain just to the right of where my heart is. Why is this?!
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replied November 17th, 2009
heart
I am going for the treadmill test to prove to the doctor that i have chest pain and shortness of breath. I do have a high heart rate and high blood pressure but been complaining for 7yrs and before the other atributes that they have found they have just put it down to athletes asthma. Now the doctor has sent me to a specialist and hopefully everything will become clearer. If you have chest pain when doing excercise PLEASE DO NOT DO EXERCISE! Go to the doctor do all the necesary checks first. No matter what age you are you still can have a heart problem which should be recodnised more...
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replied November 18th, 2009
chest and throat
Hi, I'm an 18 years old female, in shape. I get the chest pain right as i start to run too, and only running. But then for the rest of the day my throat is sore and tastes like blood, and my voice is hoarse and I have a deep wheezing cough. Also, my chest is tender to the touch. It doesn't go away until 1-2 days after running not even 10 minutes. This is very discouraging.. Do I really need a doctor for this?
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replied April 7th, 2011
Me too!! I tasted blood too after running, chest pains and deep wheezing cough... Have u seen a doctor about it already? If so what did they say? That's probably the same thing wrong with me.
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replied August 27th, 2011
I have the same problem, it hurts pretty bad to run and i cough all day after I run, and i have that blood/metal taste in my mouth. I tell my husband (who is in great shape) and he always tells me that i'm just out of shape, but i'm scared that it might be more and one day it will catch up and bite me for not seeing a doctor. I'm nervous to see a doctor about this but if he says nothing is wrong then I will stick it out and keep jogging. I think seeing a doctor is the only way to resolve the problem.
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replied September 11th, 2012
New runner - blood taste
FYI - I run 3-4 times per week, but my wife usually doesnt. She joined me yesterday (she's 37), and experienced the blood taste as well. I experienced that earlier in the year when I was just getting back into it. I would try at least a few more runs in the next week to 10 days before getting too concerned about it. I think you will see it subside dramatically as you continue. If not, see your doc. Good luck.
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replied September 21st, 2013
Haha I have the same problem as every one else here. I'll defiantly try the every-day-till-it-stops thing as I have not run in a few months. Maybe we all have a strange papa site in our throats that reacts to the numbing and different atmospheric gases as we run and it's causing the reaction! No I'm playing, but if such a thing existed, I'll see you on mars!
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replied February 27th, 2012
i think u may have a problem. u should not be getting such taste in ur mouth or tenderness. maybe it could be a virus, some other infection or worse.. consult a doctor!
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replied November 22nd, 2009
Try you breathing. I've found if you breath through your nose you won't get chest pains like you might if your breath through your mouth.
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replied December 18th, 2009
I have this same problem where the pain is straight in the center of my chest, and it makes me stop jogging. This too only happens to me when i run on pavement as i used elliptical and treadmill previously without any pain at all.
The weird thing that seems to work is to take an antacid pill or chew a few tums before my run, and it seems that I do not get these pains. It frustrates me because I don't always think about taking an antacid pill before I run, but I will continue to do so until I can pinpoint the issue.
Doctors are not the only answer, people go online because many of these issues cannot be replicated in a doctors office. I know from experience with other issues.
Try this out and post back if it helps at all. I forgot to do it on my run today and got pain, but yesterday was no problem at all. Sad
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replied December 20th, 2009
Chest pain during runnning is caused by CO2 losses due to mouth breathing. If one breathes only through the nose (in and out), the pain will not appear. How and why? It relates to body oxygenation at rest and during exercise. Here is my old article:

Why modern man gets little, if any, benefits from exercise

Breathing and oxygenation in health and sick people
If you observe modern exercising people, you will see that over 97% of them breathe through the mouth. Is this a problem? Breathing is about oxygenation of tissues. Hence, let us consider oxygenation and breathing in health and disease.

Clinical evidence clearly showed that patients with heart disease, asthma, cancer, diabetes and many other chronic conditions breathe at rest about 2, 3, or 4 times more air than the medical norm. You can easily observe their noisy and labored breathing. At the same time, low body oxygenation is the normal feature for all these patients.

Healthy people breathe little (4-6 l/min), but their oxygenation is much better. This is the paradox of breathing: those who breathe less have more oxygen in tissues.

While measurements of tissue oxygenation require special equipment, you can do a simple test that is very sensitive to tissue oxygenation. Measure your stress-free breath holding time. How it is done? The prominent Russian physiologist who worked for the first Soviet spaceship missions Dr. KP Buteyko, MD was the head of the respiratory laboratory in the 1960s. He stated about 40 years ago, “Oxygen content in the organism can be found using a simple method: after exhalation, observe, how long the person can pause their breath without stress.”

After your usual exhale, pinch your nose and count your CP (control pause) in seconds. Keep nose pinched until you experience the first desire to breathe. Practice shows that this first desire appears together with an involuntary push of the diaphragm or swallowing movement in the throat. (Your body warns you, “Enough!”) If you release the nose and start breathing at this time, you can resume your usual breathing pattern (in the same way as you were breathing prior to the test). Do not extend breath holding too long. This is the most common mistake. You should not gasp for air or open your mouth when you release your nose. The test should be easy and not cause you any stress. The CP test does not interfere with your usual breathing.

Dozens of medical studies proved that stress-free breath holding time is short in the sick and invariably long in the healthy. In my view, the CP test is the best health test that reflects health of the person.

Now you can easily confirm that sick people breathe heavy, but the CP (index of oxygenation) is small: 1-10 s of oxygen in severely sick patients, 10-20 s CP in people with mild asthma, heart disease, or diabetes. Healthy people have more than 30 s of oxygen. Breathing of healthy people is invisible and inaudible, but they have much more O2 in tissues. Why? The reasons of better oxygenation are sufficient body CO2 stores. CO2, the gas we exhale, dilates blood vessels and controls O2 release by red blood cells in tissues (the Bohr law). Hence, those who breathe little have better oxygenation.

This fact is well-known to medical doctors, but most people have a superstition or fantasy that deep or big breathing provides us with more oxygen. However, if you take 100 fast and deep breaths in succession, you can pass out or faint due to ... hypoxia (low oxygenation) of the brain. There are dozens of medical studies that confirmed this effect. Hyperventilation is a health hazard. When we start to hyperventilate, arteries and arterioles constrict and less oxygen and blood delivered to all vital organs, the brain included. Moreover, low CO2 values suppress O2 release by red blood cells (the suppressed Bohr effect). This further reduces oxygenation of the brain, heart, liver, kidneys, and all other vital organs.

Doctors who know when and how to exercise

Going back to health benefits of exercise, about 200 Russian doctors have been practicing the Buteyko self-oxygenation breathing therapy for decades. (The therapy was developed by Dr. Konstantin Buteyko, MD). They taught hundreds thousands of Russian patients and accumulated huge clinical experience how to restore body oxygenation in the sick. These doctors conducted millions of CP tests. They found that physical exercise is the main factor that helps us to increase body oxygenation (the after-effect of exercise), but only if we breathe through the nose. How and why?

When we breathe through the nose during the exercise, the human body has more CO2 in the lungs, blood and tissues because it is more difficult to breathe and we generate huge amounts of CO2. Hence, the breathing centre adapts to higher CO2 concentrations. After exercise, breathing becomes lighter (breathing is mainly regulated by CO2) and we have more oxygen in the body. The additional effect of nasal breathing relates to nitric oxide, a powerful hormone produced in nasal passages. Nitric oxide also dilates blood vessels, modulates the immune system, and normalizes transmission of nerve signals. When we breathe through the mouth, we cannot utilize our own nitric oxide. (You may know that the popular heart drug nitroglycerine reduces blood pressure and prevents heart attacks only due to its chemical transformation into nitric oxide.) No wonder, that the person who breathes through the nose during exercise looks smarter than those who are mouth-breathers.

These Russian Buteyko breathing doctors discovered that patients with heart disease can die during exercise if they breathe through the mouth. Similarly, exercise-induced asthma attacks are possible only when asthmatics breathe through their mouth during physical exercise. Hence, we should breathe only through the nose 24/7.

What are the other suggestions of these oxygenation doctors in relation to exercise?

Generally, patients with less than 10 s of oxygen in the body are not able to exercise at all. Health of these patients can be improved with Buteyko breathing exercises that boost body oxygenation. When oxygenation is better (between 10 and 20 s), patients can walk with nasal breathing and walking is a very positive factor for this group of people. In fact, patients with mild asthma and heart disease can recover in 2-4 weeks, if they start walking with nasal breathing for 5-6 hours every day. (They also should prevent mouth breathing at night and sleeping on one's back for faster recovery.)
Jogging and other intensive activities (cycling, swimming, rowing, etc.) are possible when the CP is 20 s or more. If we have less than 20 s, we cannot exercise with nasal breathing and should not do any rigorous exercise. (According to my experience, only a few people in a hundred can exercise, while breathing through the nose, when their oxygenation is less than 20 s.) But when we have more than 20 s of oxygen, exercise becomes the main tool for further health improvement. Hence, these doctors greatly encourage 2-3 hours of rigorous physical activity with nasal breathing every day.
When we breathe through the mouth, intensive workouts may have very moderate positive health effects for exceptionally fit athletes. They can slightly improve body oxygenation. But most people are not fit these days. Many people exercise for the sake of better health and ... breathe through their mouth almost nullifying the expected health benefits. Why? The gas exchange between the lungs and the outer air is much faster for mouth breathing. CO2 level in the blood gets smaller than at rest. Breathing gets heavier in comparison with metabolic rate. In addition, nitric oxide is not utilized from nasal passages. These are the reasons why people can have asthma or heart attacks, or stroke during physical activity or hours later if they breathe through the mouth.

Sorry for long post, but all these details seem me important.
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Users who thank Artour for this post: ska300  faye81 

replied October 23rd, 2011
^^ Best advice ever given. Thank you so much man. I'm 27, I had asthma as an adolescent and I've always struggled with running. Within a very short time, I'd be reduced to gasping for air and if I put more effort beyond that, I'd get a bad tweak pain in my chest near my heart and my throat would be raw and painful. After I read this, I ran 2.2 miles in 25 minutes, staying in target heart rate zone with only 4 breaks in between, maintaining breathing through my nose, taking occasional large breaths the same way when I felt really depleted, I could run for longer periods, no chest pain, and while my throat became cold for a time, there were no lasting after effects. Seriously, a previously impossible feat for me. Thanks so much, man. Keep up the good work of the spreading the word.
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replied August 13th, 2012
Right Chest Pain - NO MORE
Thanks for ur comments. I am 30yrs old, I used to get this chest pain since my high school days. I used to get this immediately after the 2KM run or so and then take a rest and used to run. So I always used to limit my run for 3 - 4KM with enough breaks.

But since last 3 days I was able to try the breathing through NOSE and 2 inhale exhale while running, it works, I was able to run 6KMS without any pains. Thanks Artour
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replied October 7th, 2012
I can't believe it. Your advice makes so much sense. It has taken me years to realise that I get chest pain because of hyperventilation. This explanation has helped even further clarify things for me in a logical way.

Many many thanks for taking the time to explain all of this.
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replied January 14th, 2010
duh.....
i get it too. always had this.. never been able to run even half a mile. could be exercised induced asthma. cold triggers it more so than warm humid air. your nose changes the air you breathe to the humid warm air like in your lungs, when u breathe through your both its cooler and dryer. you might need some asthma meds. but still get a full checkup!
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replied February 23rd, 2010
Chest pain while running
THAT HAPPENS TO ME. My workout regimen is the same, which includes the 30 minutes of elliptical or bike, but after merely like 3 or 4 minutes of running, i get a sharp pain in my chest.. and i'm a healthy 21 year old female..
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replied February 23rd, 2010
Do you breathe only through the nose during exercise?
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replied March 1st, 2010
Help!
I'm a 15 year old female and I get chest pains as well but only when jogging. I was jogging today with my lacrosse team and we only had to do a mile but not even after one lap i started getting chest pains which made me walk. It's so frustrating because it gets me very nehind the other girls and the pain stays for several hours after the run. Is this a serious problem or am i just out of shape?
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replied March 2nd, 2010
Similar story
24-year-old female, 5'3, 138 lbs and work about 1-3 days per week - working on toning up for the summer. I also get a pain in my right chest about three inches below my collar bone. I noticed it happens when I'm at about 20 minutes on the elliptical or about 5-7 minutes running. I usually can work through it as I continue the work out. Maybe it does have something to do with breathing. I am going to try an inhaler because my sister is a collegiate runner and she has sports induced asthma. I also wonder if this is related to dehydration. I know I don't drink enough water.
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replied April 5th, 2011
Chest pain while running
Hi! I am a healthy 13 year old who recently started running as a goal to get my mile time down to 7 minutes. I started working out on my oliptical, it went great! I did breath through my mouth but got no chest pain. I could go 30 minutes on my oliptical with out stopping, it was going well so i decided to run out on the road about 2 minutes in i got a sharp pain in my chest and couldnt run any further, after i came back inside it slowly faded away, while i coughed a lot. I exercise regularly and this only happens when i run, what is the cause?
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