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Keep Mixing Up My Words

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My husband said he has done some research on this and feels that it is part of early alzheimers. The problem is I can be talking and then all of a sudden I start mixing up words from other sentences and getting things all confused. Then I have to stop and start all over again but a little slower to make sure it all comes out correctly. I told my husband that I just talk to fast and mix things up. I talk before I think. He said that is not always the case. I can be talking normal and mix up my words or loose what I was talking about. Does anyone have any suggestions on this? Please help. I am only 33 with a 10 year old son getting ready to move into a new house and we want to start trying to have a baby with in the next year. Thanks
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First Helper dawningsun
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replied September 11th, 2003
I do the same. I'm only 22. I have worked with alot of people who have alzheimers and there more forgetful, they remember the past and not what is go on at the present time. I get to talking so fast that the words in my head are going a 100 mph. And I cant say anything right. Just remember to slow down and think of what is going to come out. If you are worried about this see a doctor and have them check you out.. Best of luck..
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replied October 23rd, 2003
Mixing Up Words
I don't really think there's anything to worry about. I've taken a course on alzheimer's and one thing you have to find out, is if anyone else in your family has had alzheimer's before the age of 55 (that is very important in your research). There are 2 different types of alzheimer's, one is hereditary (the onset is before 55, but very, very, very, very rarely at your age). The other type, is not hereditary and the onset is later in life, usually late 70's early 80's.

I suffer the same problem as you quite frequently and i'm 27. The reason for my mix ups are because like you said, i'm speaking before i'm thinking. Other times it's because i'm thinking of waaaay too many things at once. You say you're getting ready to move, that could be causing a lot of stress which would make you mix your words up more than usual. I also get lost in mid sentence as well and then totally forget what I was talking about until someone triggers my memory. I got a little worried at one point too but I realized something...If there's distractions, then i'm more than likely to get "lost" on what i'm saying. I've learned to turn the tv down, music down, and shut out background noise before I speak and really think about what i'm saying. I bet if you become aware of your surroundings when you mix up your words and forget what you're saying, you'll realize that something else distracted you.

One other thing that might put your mind at ease about alzheimer's is this: if you had the disease, you wouldn't even be aware at all that you mixed up your words or that you forgot what you were saying. Thus the reason that people with alzheimer's repeat what they say may times over. It affects their short term memory. Thus the reason they live in the past most of the time. Some even need their mirrors removed out of their homes because they don't recognize the person they see in the mirror anymore and it scares them. So with that information, you need not worry and if you have any other questions, feel free to ask. Hope this helps.
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replied June 5th, 2011
Wow! Thank you so much for your post. I am moving house, moving State and trying to look for a job at the same time. I'm leaving my daughter behind as she's firmly entrenched in her life and university here, she turned 21 today but she has exams and we are moving so it's like a non-event (but I feel very guilty) and having to move back to my parents' home is going to be tough. I have 3 dogs that have been living on acreage for years and will now have to live on a surburban block and be yard dogs unlike their current life where they run my home. My husband already started his new job in the new State 1 month ago and he visits on weekends to help me pack. I'm sooo hoping that is the reason why I can't get my words out correctly. I felt I had early onset Alzheimers but I've had this twice before when I was really run down (anaemic and stressed). If this doesn't go away once things are settled down, I will get a brain scan. One other thing, it only happens when I talk to my husband or daughter, never with strangers!
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replied January 9th, 2005
Keep Mixing Up My Words
If you feel you have a problem,get an appointment with a neurologist & be tested.Md's don't know enough about alzheimer's to make a good guess.
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replied January 10th, 2006
Normal, Everyday Prescription Drugs Can Make You Forgetful
Hi b. Colvin,

i'm 31, under a lot of stress (looking after my grandfather whose ad is getting much worse) and I find i've been having way too many forgetful moments, eg using the wrong word, forgetting what I was saying - before I finished my sentence, putting things that should've gone in the freezer into the fridge, etc. But i'm not getting ad, i'm just stressed out, tired, and taking several different antidepressents. So mixing your words up might be mainly the result of a drug(s) you're taking, and many drugs other than antidepressents can cause foggy forgetfulness. And I always wonder when I read and note how many of my older relatives are taking antidepressents, even some with ad and vad, if these drugs make me so forgetful, a healthy young 31 year old woman, how are they effecting them?
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replied February 21st, 2006
Extremely eHealthy
I learned a long time ago this can happen if your blood pressure is messed up. I presume it to be hiigh for this to happen. It used to happen to me all the time, and eventually I was diagnosed with high blood pressure. I now am medicated so it dont happen anymore.
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replied March 25th, 2006
This May Help Those Whom You Love And Care For
The true answer and key to our dis-eases is the link between our natural antibodies and us. Known as probiotics these are what make us strong.
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replied December 20th, 2012
early stages of alzheimer's?
I am 21 yrs old and I find I mix up words after a drink even if its just the slightest sip. Even when I havent been drinking, I find it annoying when I start talking to somebody about something and I had something good to say and while im thinking about how to say the first part of the story i completely lose the rest of the story. I dont have a family history of this disease or anything. I notice that when I get something good to say, I know what the storys about beginning, punch line and ending but I havent put it into words so I get lost trying to tell the story, and in some cases as I said before I say the intro and then forget the rest of the story. If anyone knows if this is linked to this disease I feel like I'm only young and this is a terrible thing to happen to anyone and I want to live a long memorable life and there is some hope for me if I catch it early and get onto the latest treatment possible.
I dont want to be old and alone stuck in groundhog day so if anyone at all could shed anything that would be amazing Please! Thank you so much
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replied September 20th, 2013
Couldn't agree more with RBD. people with consistent hypertension have weakened arteries because of the constant high-pressured flow of blood. This, in turn, damages the tiny blood vessels that nourish white matter in the brain. White matter allows the brain cells to communicate with each other, but its function is hijacked when lesions block the transmission of vital messages. And that’s where Alzheimer’s and other forms of vascular dementia enter the picture. I ma no doctor. I know this because my father came down with this when he was 53 years old.
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