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Hip Pain But Only At Night - Trocanter Bursitis ?

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I have lost 18 lbs and have a significant reduction in knee pain but have developed intense pain in both hips, but only when I am lying down. I have tried different beds, firm, soft and inbetween but they have no effect. When I am up and around, sitting or walking throughout the day there is no hip pain, but as soon as I lay down I get intense knife stabbing spasams in the hip I am NOT laying as well as the one I am laying on. I cannot sleep on my back or stomach due to morbid obesity. My doctor thinks it might be Trocanter Bursitis.

Does anyone have any suggestions?
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First Helper Malaise
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replied November 14th, 2007
Keep Up the Good Work & Keep Moving
Awesome job on your recent weight loss, what ever you’re doing it’s working, so the first piece of advice that I would give you is keep up your weight loss program, and remind you to always remember that what ever your goals are they are within your reach. The hardest part of achieving any goal is getting started and you’re already there.

Bursitis in any joint can be extremely painful and bursitis of the trocanter is no exception to the rule. Are you taking any ibuprophin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory to reduce the inflammation? Have you tried alternating heat and ice throughout the day? At night when you are the most uncomfortable you might consider taking a long hot shower to relax the joints prior to going to bed. Once in bed try placing a pillow or two between your legs while on your side and ice the side that is up while lying down. Place two or three pillows under your knees whenever you’re on your back and keep moving as often and as much as you possibly can.

Good Luck & Best Wishes,
Tyton
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replied November 29th, 2007
Response to "keep Up the Good Work & Keep Moving"
Tyton:

Thank you for the suggestions.

I take Naproxen 1-2 times a day, but cannot take it at night due to conflicts with the Beta-Blocker I take at bedtime. I do take Acetiminophen, 500 mg, 2 tabs before I go to bed, but it only helps a little.

I have tried heat, but it seems to make it worse. I will try an ice pack this Friday, but the pain is not on the surface, but quite deep, so I wonder what effect it will have.

I exercise 2-3 times a week doing water aerobics, but I have a sit-down job at a computer so I do a lot of sitting. I try to get up and walk (to get a cup of coffee or use the restroom about every hour and a half) just to change movement but this has had no effect on the pain (I only hurt at night and 1st thing in the morning.)

I have tried a pillow between my knees, but have not really noticed any difference. I cannot sleep on my back, even with pillows under my knees due to morbid obesity (my stomach is so big it pushes down on my diaphram making it harder to breath when I am on my back.)

No matter what, I will continue to loose weight because the health benifits outweigh the pain!
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replied June 20th, 2009
Hip pain only at night.
I have the same problem and wondering if it is not related to excercise. Although I am only 20 lbs. overweight, I have high blood pressure, therefore it is is recommended to excercise and loose weight. The pain, however only goes away if I do not excercise. I tried sleeping on my back with pillows under my knees, between my legs when lying on my side. It does not help much. I keep turning around: side to side, back to side, and eventually I take some pain killer.
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replied June 20th, 2009
Community Volunteer
I found with a sore knee that exercise makes it worse...Therapy added to the pain...For me it was putting it up and resting it...Pain killers are part of my diet....Good luck...

Caroline
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replied March 7th, 2012
Hip pain when laying flat.
This forum is really old, but I am having the same problem. I am 27 and healthy in every way. Over the last year and a half I have lost 75 pounds and it's been about a year or so that I have been noticing my left hip clicking when I walk. It never caused pain so I never did anything about it. Then about 5 months ago I started having this pain when I am laying down at night. I sleep on both sides with pillow supports, and I have tried NSAIDS with no relief. The pain goes away once I am out of bed for the morning. It usually takes about a half hour to go away. But most recently, for the last week or two I have been having the pain deep in my buttock, it almost feels like sciatica (I've had a back injury in my past and I know what that is all about). It hurts when I am walking at a fast pace, but I can jog at a 5.5-6.0 mph on the treadmill with no problem. It has to do with the range of motion in that hip I'm thinking. So I finally scheduled an appointment with my doctor because this is getting annoying and I am not getting good sleep because of the pain. I'm just relieved to have found someone that seems to have the same issue as me.
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replied January 6th, 2013
There is an herb called Boswellia that you can find at health food stores, etc., that really helped me with hip joint pain. It works better than NSAIDS. Also,MSM, chondroitin and glucosamine work well in combination with Boswellia.
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replied March 13th, 2012
Is my hip pain related to Fibromyalgia
I am a 60 yr old female with fibromyalgia (diagonosed 10 yrs ago by rheumatologist). Over the last 3-4 months I have developed a deep aching pain in both hips when I lie down at night. If I try to lie on either hip the pain is like the worst bruise you ever had and even the opposite hip hurts. The pain goes from the hips all down to below my knees in spasms. I don't think this problem is associated with FM and I know I should see my GP but I don't find him very sympathetic - I think he feels FM is something you have to live with or take anti-depressants for. I occasionally have problems with pain when I climb stairs but only on my left hip. Does anyone have any ideas?
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replied March 13th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
BagpusK,

The hip is a very large and complex region. What one patient describes as hip pain, may actually be coming from something other than the hip joint itself.


The true hip joint is usually located in the groin region, directly under the femoral artery. Occasionally, problems in the true hip joint will refer pain to the medial side of the distal thigh, just above or at the medial knee joint. Osteoarthritis of the hip joint will cause pain in this area.


Other problems that can show up anteriorly , include such things as bursitis, tendonitis, and snapping hip syndrome.

Greater trochanteric bursitis will cause pain on the lateral side of the hip, over the greater trochanter. This pain is usually worse with palpation or pressing on it. It can be increased by stretching the tensor fascia lata muscle, which goes over the greater troch. But, usually, this is diagnosed by the location of the discomfort and when the physician palpates the area.

Medially, in the area between the legs, discomfort here usually comes from adductor tendonitis. Occasionally, psoas tendonitis, where it inserts onto the lesser trochanter will also show up as pain in this region.

In the posterior hip region, pain is usually deep in the buttocks. This is where the short external rotator muscles of the hip are located. Problems with these muscles can cause deep posterior hip pain. Piriformis syndrome will also manifest with deep buttock pain. Other, posterior pain can come from structures other than the hip. This includes SI (sacroiliac) joint dysfunction, low back pain, sciatica, and tendonitis of the muscles that attach to the pelvic brim (crest).


So, if you are having significant problems in the hip region, you may want to see an orthopedic surgeon for a thorough evaluation, and possibly some screening x-rays. Again, the “hip” is a big area, with a lot of different reasons for problems. It usually takes a thorough evaluation by a physician who knows how to examine the hip well, to determine exactly what is going on. Often, with primary care providers, any pain around the hip is given the wastebasket diagnosis of “arthritis”. And, there are so many other things that can cause discomfort around the hip.

It is doubtful that your fibromyalgia is causing your hip problems. Though some of the fibromyalgia “trigger points” are around the hip, that does not mean that fibromyalgia causes hip problems.


So, again, you should probably see an orthopedic surgeon for an evaluation.


Good luck.
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replied March 15th, 2012
Hip Pain
Gaelic, Thanks for the information. You are right about seeing a specialist, unfortunately here in the UK we have to go through our GPs (primary care providers)to obtain expert medical advice on a specific subject. Hopefully he will agree to refer me as I am at the end of my tether with this problem. Thanks again.
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