Medical Questions > Mental Health > Sleep Disorders Forum

Bored-a-mitosis? Sleepy when bored ... Sleep Disorder? (Page 1)

I don't know exactly how to introduce this problem... so lets start from the top
Im 22, exercise daily, athletic build, average weight, eat 3 good meals almost every day, never been inside a hospitol since birth(literally)

I've been a bit of a computer junky since the mid 90s, I'm an incredible multitasker and an insanely fast learner. Any free time that I am not playing a computer game, with music on, while talking to friends via skpe (online conference calling), and sometimes the tv on too... im buried in one kind of reading material or the other, making a near futile attempt at absorbing a fraction of the worlds information

and now the problem: it seems that every time I get bored I can fall asleep almost instantly, i typically get 5-7 hours of sleep, and if i try to sleep longer I end up waking up way before my alarm! feeling refreshed and awake with no hope of falling back to sleep, despite many attempts!

90% of the time i wouldnt consider this a problem, obviously if theres so little going on that I can fall asleep then why shouldnt I? the problem arises when im behind the wheel of my 06 mustang and traffic is slow or theres just nothing much going on. Doesn't matter what time of day, where the sun is, etc, and i'd say it only happens about once or twice a week (oddly enough it happens more when the sun is out than when it is not)
It seems like once i slip into this phase, there is no hope of escaping, i sing at the top of my lungs, twitch, scream, shake, dance, windows down, ac blasting, music blasting... nothing breaks me out!

then quite possibly the strangest part of all: the minute get of my car or, (if its one of the isolated non-driving times, as soon as i can find some mental stimulation) the problem fades just as fast as it appears

Lots of times on days when this happens, i think to myself, oh ill just take a nap when i get home, but it has never lasted from the car to the door... AND lots of times i will barely even remember driving home! that part acually scares me

my first thought was a blood flow problem, but like i said, no amount of moving seems to make much difference, i usually end up just screaming and acually getting angry becuase i cant break out of it

i know thats a lot to take in, but any ideas or suggestions? i would really hate to completely fall asleep at the wheel and wreck, but i have to drive to get around...

oh and if anyone is going to say caffine, i rarely touch the stuff, my soda of choice has always been A&W root beer, so i never built a tolerance for caffine... if i have a Mountain Dew after 7:00pm I lay awake in bed for HOURS before i can even consider falling asleep
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First Helper rdtalcott
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replied November 1st, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Do you feel tired during the day like you hadn't enough sleep?
Do you usually get headaches or other symptoms of sickness while driving?
Do you practice eating before driving?
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replied November 7th, 2011
I've had the same thing happen to me.
If i'm bored I eventually nod off regardless of how much sleep i've gotten previous.
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replied November 1st, 2007
Do you feel tired during the day like you hadn't enough sleep?
Never, in fact, most of the time when I come out of this, I feel more than typically energetic, almost as if i had acually "taken a nap" for the car ride

Do you usually get headaches or other symptoms of sickness while driving?
No, there are no painful ailments that come along with this... In fact i dont think ive had more than 5 headaches this year

Do you practice eating before driving?
Usually, I would say, my drive home in the afternoon comes a little while after i've had anything to eat, but on the other hand, sometimes to shake it off i'll stop at a gas station for a bag of chips or something, and it usually fades before i even make it inside the store...
I get the chips anyway, becuase 10 minutes down the road it has a good chance to come right back as if i had never broken out of it
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replied November 3rd, 2007
?
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replied November 7th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Do you eat healthy?
Have you been told that you are snoring loudly?
Have you experienced waking up in a sweat during the night?
Do you feel unrefreshed in the morning after a night’s sleep?
Do you have thyroid problems?
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replied November 7th, 2007
Do you eat healthy?
I wouldn't call myself a poster boy for nutrition, but I eat healthy enough. Not to mention, this has lasted for several years, through many different living locations and eating habits, so I'd be suprised if it was connected.

Have you been told that you are snoring loudly?
Nope, I don't snore... so I've been told.

Have you experienced waking up in a sweat during the night?
Never.

Do you feel unrefreshed in the morning after a night’s sleep?
Nope, in fact, I've been beating my alarm most mornings when I wake up, and I exercise for 30min every morning which is also refreshing.

Do you have thyroid problems?
I dont even know what that is, but I've had regular doctor checkups and never heard the term mentioned.
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replied November 12th, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Is this happening only during working days or in weekends, too?
Do you usually have this "accident" in afternoons?
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replied November 20th, 2007
can happen both weekends and weekdays
yes, its most typical in the afternoons
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replied November 22nd, 2007
Extremely eHealthy
Most of the adults need 7-9 hours sleep per night. It's possible that you think you're getting enough sleep - and still not be. If something is disturbing your sleep, you might not be getting enough time in the restorative deep and REM stages of sleep. Even though you don't wake up enough to remember it in the morning, your sleep will not be refreshing.
In the afternoon, when our circadian rythyms generally are at a low point of the daily cycle, it's tougher to fight off the sleepies.
We are biologically programmed to be more sleepy and less alert in overnight hours and mid-afternoon, and those times in the 24-hour cycle are known as circadian dips.
There is laboratory evidence that short sleep durations of 5 hours have negative physiological and neurobehavioral consequences.
It's important for you to pay attention to your own individual needs by assessing how you feel on different amounts of sleep.
I'll suggest you to see a sleep specialist and also, to avoid a meal before driving home in the afternoons (when you eat your blood goes to your stomach to help digest and you get sleepy).

Best wishes!
Marija
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replied October 27th, 2009
I thought it was only me.
This happens to me too!
Doesn't matter if I've had 6 hours of sleep or 15 hours, it's not being tired, it's like your mind wanting to shut off, and take your body with it.

It's like an almost instant and insatiable need for sleep, but it comes and goes at it's own bidding once you get bored and NEVER happens if you're mind is really engaged right?! (Never had it happen while playing video games or during an interesting movie even if I had a legitimate reason to be tired like no sleep or something)

I've had days at work where I'm falling asleep at my keyboard almost to the point of what you'd see in hollywood "blackouts" but then get a mail for a project I'm really interested in and be 100% fine 2 lines into it.

If you find out anything about this PLEASE let me know
m
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replied January 20th, 2010
You may not like to hear this, but find someone who knows about ADHD. Most doctors don't, unfortunately. From what I've read, SOME people (not all) w/ ADHD experience falling asleep at the wrong times simply b/c the neurotransmitters in the brain are out of balance, and there is not enough stimulation to keep the brain awake. (Think of the student who falls asleep in class - sleep so deep he falls out of his chair). If you can't find a good Dr, get book by Thomas Brown called Attention Deficit Disorder. Lots of good info online, too. And your multitasking, your need to have music on while working - that's the "fidgit" that ADD people need to keep the brain sufficiently stimulated so they can concentrate. The doing extra stuff actually enhances the concentration for people w/ ADD (so of course you know to ignore all that advice about studying in a quiet place.)

Hope this helps. Drive safe. And get help before you have a car accident!
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replied January 28th, 2010
ADD and sleep issues
I'm experiencing the same thing and have actually taking into account that i might have ADD, once I get health insurance I will be doing a sleep study and I will for sure look into ADD as well, 'cause I feel like that the times that I'm not using my brain that's when I'm likely to fall a sleep.
Now that i have graduated college and started searching more about my sleep problem, and really feel like it's ADD, i think I really could have done so much better in school but instead i waisted so much money and I didn't pick up a thing. I know I am a very smart person and is capable of doing anything, very fast learner as well, but when sleep comes no matter what i do I just can't help it and usually it used to come right in the middle of lecture, I hated my self.

I hate my self now, 'cause i feel like it's taking over my life. I just feel very helpless...
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replied January 29th, 2010
Rajaa,

My husband only found out he had ADD when he was in his 40s. He feels the same way as you about school - that feeling of knowing he was smart, and not understanding why he couldn't do well at school. Then all the years and life decisions based on that feeling and that bad school experience. He was diagnosed when we found our child has it. The diagnosis has changed (improved) how he feels about himself and also improved his work.

So... don't feel worthless, or that you are alone. Point 1: you found out now, and not in your later life, so that is good.

Point 2: YOu have been running the same race as everyone else, but with an invisible disability. Congratulations on having made it so far, gotten through college even! Good work.

Point 3: This is a neurochemical disorder, nothing you can be responsible for if only you "try harder." We don't blame a blind person for being blind, or a lame person for being lame. We don't tell a kid who needs glasses to try harder in order to see. We recognize the problem and treat it.

So, you've recognized a problem. Now, the next step... If you are interested, there's good info on-line at ADDitude magazine - everything from what to do to how to know if you have it to what to ask a doctor. Also books by Hallowell and Ratey are informative and easy to get through, though we found they focus more on the hyperactive type than the inattentive type of ADD we have in our family.

Maybe the sleep study will find something, but remember that sleep doctors don't necessarily know about ADD. You may end up w/ sleep dr. saying you have nothing wrong at all. But you can learn about ADD on-line even w/out heath insurance.

Good luck.
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replied January 29th, 2010
ADD and sleep issues
Thank you so much jsalv4, I think that is about the clearest and thoughtful message I have ever read. my parents are not American and where i come from i don't think they have ever heard of such things as ADD or sleep disorders, maybe just because it does not run in the family that's why they don't know anything about it. But it's great to hear from you that I am not alone and such things do exist and hopefully I will find a solution to my problem, I just don't want this to take over the rest of my life too.
I'm really hoping I can go back to grad. school but I don't want to go back until I have my sleeping problem resolved so i can make best of my money.

Again I thank you and will for sure look into the site that you recommended.

quick question: How did your husband's ADD improve? did he start taking medication? Also, I start doing some research, and I feel like ADD is for REAL hyper people and I'm not like that at all, I'm very normal, my only issue the sleeping that comes when it shouldn't, that's all=)

Thank you!!
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replied January 31st, 2010
Attention Deficit Disorder and Sleep
Hi again,

I know it's hard when people you love don't know about or believe in the disorder. It's also a common experience - not just your parents!

We also thought ADD was just for hyperactive kids, so we thought our child didn't have it. She is very smart, likes learning, and could focus for extremely long periods when she was reading or playing, but she had such a hard time doing things like cleaning up toys, or getting dressed, or doing boring kindergarten worksheets. Her k'garten teacher said she had "attention issues." So, we looked into it more on-line, and learned about inattentive type ADD (the type with no hyperactivity), and realized that we should get her tested for it. That's when my husband recognized the symptoms in himself.

Yes, my husband uses medicine. He read on-line about the various medications, and then went to his doctor. He already had a diagnosis, so the doctor was willing to give him a trial prescription of Ritalin. He could feel it kick in. Since then, he's found a psychiatrist who specializes in ADD, and has tried various other formulations to find the one that works best with his particular body. I can tell when he's taken teh medicine and when he's forgotten - he's much more "spacey" without it. The medicine won't solve all problems - it won't undo a lifetime of habits (he tends to procrastinate, be disorganized, have trouble with his sense of how long different tasks will take) - but it definitely helps him stay focussed and aware and on task.

Remember, I'm not a specialist, just the wife and mother of people who have Innatentive type ADD, so I can't guarantee it's what you have. I just know that I've read about symptoms like yours in one of the books we have on ADD - it's a book by Thomas Brown called "Attention Deficit Disorder". Another book we got from the library was called "Is it you, me, or Adult ADD?"

Good luck.
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replied April 17th, 2010
inattentive adhd
thank you a bunch for posting this...i think i finally know whats wrong with myself as well..im 22 and am about the same way you are lender, always knew there was something wrong with myself never could find out what it was, i can''t even read a book without falling asleep if im not interested it doesn''t entertain me...i''ll last maybe 3 pages on a good day. It might not be the only reason but..its kinda looking that way i lost thinks as a kid all the time i still forget when i put laundry in and end up having too rewash little thinks like that...its rather odd. i don't mean too forget i tell myself alright..30 minutes do this then forget what i said 30 mins ago.
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replied November 15th, 2011
Wow..
all I can say is wow.
I thought I was the only one with this issue. Several of you, including specifically rdtalcott, questionablequestions, and !ender_'s have all described word for word what I've dealt with for YEARS.
By years I mean I've had this as early back as I can remember (lets say high school). It has gradually effected me more and more ie through college and now that I have a full-time job. meetings? pfft! fall asleep in them most times no matter how hard I fight to stay awake. It is my theory this is also why I get such bad road hypnosis.. if any of you can verify this one for me please hit me up!
I've been to doctors who say I don't have ADD and have ruled it right off, but (while I can't tell my doctors this I don't think) I've tried other friends' ADD meds and they seem to work wonders! I clearly saw a difference when I was on and off them.
Anyways.. what I am really pleading here for is this: if ANYONE has dealt with this problem and found a cure/medication or even a name for it that doctors would understand I would be in your debt a thousand fold. Visiting yet another doctor who will probably tell me the same thing as all the others either it's sleep apnia or nympholepsy .. neither of which I know for a fact it really is.
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replied December 30th, 2011
I can tell you that I have this problem and I went to a psychologist who tested me for ADHD and found that while I was not hyperactive in the typical sense (often not diagnosed in women due to not having the more obvious hyperactive signs), that my mind needed the constant stimulation to keep me awake. I had trouble staying awake in boring classes, meetings, in the car, etc despite being healthy, active and having plenty of sleep. They described what I was experiencing as basically my mind which works at a much faster speed than most (very high IQ) getting bored so turning off, at times I would fall asleep so abruptly in class during HS that I nearly fell out of my chair. Later drives to/from work were also a battle since I had an hour commute each way. I eventually started taking medication and my doctor worked with me until we found one that helped. I still struggle with morning drives but can now manage to stay awake through most things. I also try to keep myself more engaged in things during the drive and often talk to friends (hands free of course) while driving home after work. While some would say this is less safe, I say its better than me falling asleep while driving.
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replied August 27th, 2012
extreme extrovert?
Ive got the same problem, for me its usually during meetings or paperwork. I actually fall asleep, or struggle to keep eyelids up and its very offecive to other people.

I know that i dont fit the adhd bill at all, but i have read that extreme extroverts (like me) often need a LOT of stimulus to focus. I find this is true. For instance i work better with music on to keep myself from being bored, or doing studying in a cafe with a lot of people scramming about. So far not a problem while driving cause im terrified of it but im dreading the day when it bores me.. I really fall asleep hard and quick Sad
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replied October 16th, 2012
Sleep all day, up all night, 61 and retired for 9 years now.
Well I'm 61 and retired early at 52 just because I could.
I had worked, running my own business for 35 years beginning at the age of 17. Worked my rear off all the time, raised my two sons by myself, and retired to the mountains to rebuild our family cabin.
I have nothing to do. I'm bored. Literally nothing to do. I play some golf but don't like playing alone. Have 3 herniated discs and my right knee is bone to bone so walking the course, which I would really love to do for the physical enjoyment, is out of the question. My problem is that I'm up all night just as if it were the daytime, and all day, I'm tired.
Not depressed, have to trauma or life issues that threaten me, can or could travel all I want but see no point in it, I'd rather be around my kids and grand kids but they are all working. I sometimes baby sit my grandson.
I'm just 12 hours flipped. If I were to feel as tired at night as I am in the day, I'd get great sleep. If I were as alert in the day as I am at night, I could do anything. I sleep well when I do sleep. Been up for 2 to 3 days without sleep trying to force myself to go to bed at 9 pm so I could wake up at 7 am and get up and get going but only slept for 5 hours and woke up at 1 am bright eyed and bushy tailed.
What is wrong?
Stephen
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