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Stuck tendons along scar tissues on hand.. Tips?

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Recently got surgery on a serious injury on my hand. Currently right now, I have stuck tendons along my scar tissues on my palm and top and is extremely hindering my fingers movement which i need to get moving asap b4 my 2nd surgery.

I tried - traditional massage by hand and portable tip massager and stretching exercises my OT told me to do ..around 3-4 times a day .. recently I also have tried a Asian technique .. with a sterling silver coin dollar and boiled egg wrapped around stretch gauze .. performing a up/down motion along the scar tissue.. not sure if that is even doing anything ..

You guys got any tip on what i should do to get my tendon loose asap? Please let me know..
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replied February 20th, 2011
anyone/??!
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replied June 25th, 2011
I've got the same problem on my foot after surgery to insert three screw to correct a Lisfranc fracture. Massage isn't working so my surgeon will be going back in to release the tendon that allows me to flex my big at the same time he goes back in to remove my screws.
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replied July 20th, 2012
I have just had my 5th operation because my tendons stuck down, 1st op finger straight wouldnt bend, 2nd op finger stuck down (bent) 3rd op a silcone strip put on top, worked perfectly but they didnt cover the 2 tendons coming down so finger stuck in bent position again, operation 4 couldnt save joint so surgeon didnt bother trying more silicone. 5th op finger now fused and joint release at top of hand hoping for bending movement, finger temporarily wired in flexed position. This is being removed in 3 days and we are hoping for that 1 in 80% chance of success. They cant do any more ops apart from removal of the pinky if this does not work, I have jumped from surgeon to surgeon, all I want is a bit of normality. Its been 3 years and 3 months since I merely fractured and dislocated my pinky
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replied July 20th, 2012
Tendons become stuck down by scar tissue
I have just had my 5th operation because my tendons stuck down, 1st op finger straight wouldnt bend, 2nd op finger stuck down (bent) 3rd op a silcone strip put on top, worked perfectly but they didnt cover the 2 tendons coming down so finger stuck in bent position again, operation 4 couldnt save joint so surgeon didnt bother trying more silicone. 5th op finger now fused and joint release at top of hand hoping for bending movement, finger temporarily wired in flexed position. This is being removed in 3 days and we are hoping for that 1 in 80% chance of success. They cant do any more ops apart from removal of the pinky if this does not work, I have jumped from surgeon to surgeon, all I want is a bit of normality. Its been 3 years and 3 months since I merely fractured and dislocated my pinky
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replied June 25th, 2011
Especially eHealthy
midombro,

As I'm sure your surgeon told you, it will extremely important for you to start moving the toes immediately after surgery to reduce the chances of the tendons adhering once again.

Since you don't have to protect the reduction and fixation of the Lisfranc fracture/dislocation this time, you should be able to start movement as soon as the anesthesia wears off. Of course, follow your surgeon's and physical therapist's instructions closely.

You already have scar tissue around those tendons, and the surgery to remove the screws, and the tenolysis itself, will produce more scar tissue. With motion, adhesions don't get a chance to form and the collagen that is laid down is done in "proper alignment" of the fibers (rather than hap hazardly). Tenolysis is always that double edged sword - it releases the tendons, but it itself causes more scar tissue. So, you have to really weight the benefits and risks. In your case, the nonoperatively treatment has not resulted in satisfactory results, so surgery is probably worth a shot, especially since the surgeon is going to be in there anyways.

Good luck in your upcoming surgery.
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