Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Stroke Forum

Stroke on right side of brain

Must Read
What happens during a stroke? What increases your chances of having a stroke? Stroke basics and info on the two types of stroke here....
Strokes can happen with virtually no warning signs. Learn the symptoms of stroke so that you can take immediate action in case of emergency....
I had a Stroke on the 29th October 2009, this was followed by a number of TIAs then at the end of March i had another Stroke again involving my left side,thankfully they seemed to have settled down now. I have been left with a weakness on my left side, although i can walk and use my aem and hand, they are weak and i tend to drop things, i can be holding something and it will just give way almost like a spasm, the same with my leg, it will just collapse and recover just as quickly. my balance is also affected.

Although, litrature says that right-sided stroke patients dont have problems with speech, i seem to, when i m tired, i can either stammer, (or it is difficult to explain,) it is almost like my mouth twitches and i cant get the words out. I also find i difficult to find the words i wnat to use, which is really frustrating. It is the same with sentences, i get half way through them and i find i cant finish them although in my mind i know what it is i want to say. my family are very good and can usually finish for me, but if it is with someone i dont know i start getting upset and the whole thing gets much worse.

I also get extremlely tired, not just tired i mean exhausted, it takes me most of the day to do just little jobs around the house, i have to keep stopping and sometimes i am so tired i have to go to bed and can sleep for hours.

I have problems with my bladder and i have seen the consultant who hopefully has the answer to the incontenance so thats a plus point.

Although i am allowed to drive again, i dont and my daughter does all the driving because there has been a number of occasions webre i have just forgotten what ot do, fo example i was at my gps for my check up and i always reverse out and i just forgot how to do it, jade my daughter had to guide me. so now i dont drive, but my memory is just terrible i repat things all the time,, i tell her things over and over again she has the patience of a saint. and i forget what im doing or what i have done, im not safe to be on my own, i was making her tea i put the pan on , put the pasta in , but no water and went and sat down.


What i want to know is anbody else like this afte a right sided stroke. especially the speech and tiredness





.
Did you find this post helpful?
First Helper Sheila45
|
Users who thank Sheila45 for this post: Randymac45 

replied August 15th, 2009
yes my husband is the same way. he had a stroke in june. he wants to drive so bad but im afraid to let him because he has problems remembering things and concentrating on more than one thing at a time. he forgets everthing and repeats things over and over again. he was also diagnosed with ms on teusday which makes it worse. he cant be left alone. when he gets tired he starts to slur his speach. he drops things with his left hand. he is having alot of problems walking for more than 15 minutes at a time. and he takes three hour naps just about everyday around 1 or 2 in the afternoon. so you are not the only one.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied November 28th, 2012
Sheila and minx, just happened on this board, and thankful I found it. Reading your posts, is like reading my own story. Right side stroke, limited use left side and keep dropping things with that hand. Have authored two books, and used to type 85 wpm, now lucky to get 30 with all the backspace deleting when I make mistakes. Brain just isn't communicating with the left hand very well anymore. Hoping everyone here finds some relief, but for now thankful I'm not totally losing my mind.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied November 28th, 2012
By the way, I was diagnosed 11 years ago with occular migraines with aura. I learned to ignore these as anything else, and have now learned many of these were actually minor strokes. The MRI showed damage right side of my brain severe enough that I should be paralyzed, but lucky I'm not. If anyone here has been told that diagnosis, go see a neurologist, they say this is not a good one.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied August 26th, 2009
I had a right-side stroke I was blessed, remember everything still can't walk after having my stroke on 02/02/04. I can read and strain to write. But overall, I am doing ok. At first everything were fast now its dragging slowly. What I thought was three days still going on.
Barbara
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 15th, 2009
I had a stroke on 22/04/09 and I too have problems with finding the words for objects and trying to finish sentences. The doctors at the local hospital say I have had a stroke and my specialist says I may have MS. I am having an MRI next Tuesday to see what shows up. Also, I suffer from high blood pressure, which to date no one can find what the cause is. All extremely frustrating. I will keep you posted as to the results and outcome of my tests
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 15th, 2009
Extremely eHealthy
My coworker had a right-side stroke without brain damage, she ended up with a sensory blindspot on her right side. Because of sensory adjustment she could see and hear everything around her but things that came at her from the right simply didn't exist. If you walked up to her from the right and pushed her she couldn't see or feel you. She could hear you walking nearby but she couldn't judge how far away. and she was aware that her body was moving but you were completely invisible until she turned towards you and you'd suddenly appear. She also couldn't turn to the right because her brain couldn't process the information and she'd end up blacking out. Oddly this terrified me more than it did her. Two month later she has other associated health complications and if she's tired of hungry sometimes she has trouble noticing things on the right but it's a huge change from her turning around to the left in circles and staring at doors unable to figure out how to open them because the doorknob is on the right side.

Stroke does a real scramble-job on your brain. Have faith that your mind is an awesome organ and you'll be able to compensate and repair much if not all of that damage.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 30th, 2009
wow, you typed a huge amount of text, so you are doing AWESOME! Exhaustion is a number one issue for strokes. the entire body is working overtime to compensate for the changes. Being tired can bring on the slurred speech even more, and reduced cognitive processing.

A speech therapist can help you with word recall. My husband's therapist even had him playing some games on the internet (specific sites) to assist him with speech processing from a cognitive level.

Sounds like you are doing great, and you recognize the areas where you are still weak and are getting help when you need it. You go girl!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied November 6th, 2009
Massive stroke-right side brain
My dad had a massive stroke on the right side,31st Aug after a previous brain bleed in May.He has no movement on his left side,he wakes periodically,sometimes staring into space.I see him 6 days a week and notice that no day is the same.He does have his short & long term memory though,so that is something to be thankful for.His speech is sometimes mumbled when tired and a full conversation is rare,although has still a sense of humor!Thankfully he leaves hospital,9th Nov to a high care facility where his progress may improve with activity and stimulation when our family is not there,doctors don't seem as optimistic as I.Fingers crossed he shows them!Best of luck on the road to recovery to all survivors.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied December 2nd, 2009
new to the stroke subject
From a son

Hi, Sorry but this is going to be a long one.

My dad who is 75 years old has just been diagnosed with a stroke (minor) today. It was terrifying for me as I have only ever known my dad as the sharpest person I know and is always on top of things. He is visiting me at the moment as is a stressful time for me as on top of the economy playing havoc with my business, I have also been taken to court by my ex-wife to whom I haven't been able to pay fully for the past few months as business has really been very bad. Now she wants to take my kids away and live in Australia with her new husband ( I pay an extortionately large amount for my 2 kids who live with her every month). All this stress had also taken a toll on my dad as well as I could sometimes see the pain on his face as he knew the difficulties I am going through. Anyway, last weekend, he was absolutely normal and fine and chatty etc. Come monday morning, he seemed his usual self on the drive to my office (he helps out whenever he's here with my accounts). As I was due in court that afternoon, I asked him to write out a cheque for my ex-wife, as some funds had come in. After about 20 minutes, I went to check on when I could have the cheque and I saw him with about 20 wrongly written out cheques around him and he couldn't write the amount, date or her name (he was actually writing his childhood friends name and variations of it on the cheques). Of course, right then I noticed the blank look on his face. I took him into my office and tried to ask him what he was doing, and all he could say was, his friends name and that since we had the funds and was going to court, we should pay him. Now at this time, I was completely scared as I had never known him to miss a beat. I told him my ex-wifes name and he still kept repeating his friends name saying yes, that's what he was writing as per my request. I had to leave him there in my room to rest and asked my colleagues to look out for him and make sure he doesn't leave the office premises on his own.

Upon my return from court, I filled him in on the afternoons events but he kept saying,"that's correct" and "Ok" and "good". I had lost my case. Then I started noticing that everything he said was basically ridiculous. I sometimes tried to correct him but most of the time I just agreed with him. My mum called and after a while of speaking to him, basically hung up. She called me back on my mobile and said your dad was talking nonsense so I hung up on him. I just told her he was tired.I still thought he was just stressed and made him his dinner and he went to bed. Next morning, he said that "yesterday I couldn't lift his right arm for about 10 minutes... but was fine after that" Alarm bells rang. Straight to the doctors and now he is admitted to hospital. The attending doctor did a CT scan and confirmed that he had a stroke with no physical problems except it had affected the part of his brain which controls memory and speech. He is not slurring but getting mixed up with dates, time, events, objects and he can say my mobile number really clearly. I am so scared. I want my dad, my best friend back. Though I am 44 years old, my dad has always been the one person who I can truly call my confidante and friend. He has been through Quadruple bypasses as well as throat cancer and beat it all. I am truly hoping and praying that my dad will be fine. Seeing him detiorate so much in an instant is truly mind boggling. He is a learned man who enjoys intellectual conversations and politics etc. There are moments of clarity but not most of the time these last couple of days.

I am praying that he will always be able to use his mind to the fullest as he always has. Any advise would be helpful and thank you for reading this.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied December 3rd, 2009
Healing time
I wish you & your father the best.Fortunately(if I can say that) you say that the stroke is minor.Your father will recover with help.It is extremely frightening for him too,so give your support & brain exercises(puzzles like spot the differences etc)I know it sounds childish but it helps to start with,then move on to find a words,crosswords,suduko.The brain is quite amazing,be patient & remember that the brain takes time to heal.
All the best.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied December 3rd, 2009
Hi Gojo212

Thank you very much for your kind words, encouragement and advise. I truly appreciate it. Today, he seemed a little less incoherent and I noticed that when he was just speaking to me with no pressure about identifying certain objects, he was fine and fluid but whenever I asked him specifics, he seemed to answer too fast and thus getting the words mixed up.

Yes, I will be patient of course. I really do feel encouraged by your words. Thanks again.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied December 6th, 2009
Stroke
I had a stroke 2005, with a total left-side loss. Mostly it is recovered with only an impediment of the left leg, dropped foot and some other inactive muscles, remaining. Fatigue is still a major problem, but smile it always improves,although it takes time. Keep mentally active if you can and always believe that it will improve.

Best of luck to all who have sufferred or have someone dear who has been affected

Wilf
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied December 30th, 2009
I just found this site and it's so good to read posts from other stroke survivors. I am 45, had a right brain stroke 11/22/09. I was discharged yesterday and am having trouble coping with being back home.I am getting some movement in my left arm and leg, can use a walker with great caution around our small condo. my husband is home from work for one more week, then I'll be alone most of the day. I was home alone in the shower when I had my stroke. I'm feeling apprehensive about being alone again at this point.I'm easily overwhelmed by mental tasks and stress, have divided attentionproblems, some impulsivity and impatience. So what else is new. Smile
leesey
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied February 8th, 2011
zanne1 wrote:
My wife Suzanne 61 years old, had her first major brain haemorrhage involving the right temporal and parietal lobes in March 2010 and after 5 weeks in hospital, after an urgent craniotomy to remove the blood, she went to the rehab unit where after another 5 weeks I took her home. An angiogram was done when she was at the rehab hospital which indicated that all the veins in her brain were normal. The professor diagnosed Amyoloid Angiopathy.
She had the use of her speech, could eat by herself and the use of her right arm and leg. Her spatio visual improved well and she was even starting to do cross word puzzles As the next few months progressed, Suzanne got better with neuro physio and occupational therapy and was getting to the point, where she started to take a few assisted steps and she was hugely positive that she would walk unaided within a few months.

Unfortunately, she had another massive brain haemorrhage in the same area of the brain on the 23 September 2010 and went through the normal trauma of this insult to the brain, surgical intensive care unit with ventilator, venticular drain etc. After 4 weeks, she was admitted to the general ward but this time, she has no movement in ANY of her limbs and is unable to speak. She is able to move her head only. We started neuro physio and occup therapy and speech therapy already by the second week. After 2 months Suzanne had another haemorrhage which was unknown to us and was picked up on an MRI which was done to try to understand why her right side and speech was affected when the MRI indicated that the structure of the left brain was intact but a right frontal haematoma had developed.

What was interesting is that with the previous bleeds, if Suzanne had not been admitted to hospital immediately, she would have died of the brain bleed yet we were unaware of this frontal lobe bleed. There was no indiction of this last bleed in any of her vital signs. Remember, she could not speak and tell us anything.

She has now been admitted to a care facility from 1 December 2010 because she requires 24 hour nursing. She still has neuro physio daily and occupational and speech therapy 2 to 3 times a week. Suzanne is in a wheelchair twice a day and is taken for a 1 to 2 hour walk in the care centre to stimulate her brain, see the gardens and experience the fresh air. Suzanne has a complete understanding of what we are saying to her and she vocalises this through a crying response which really is traumatic for the family. Remeber, she also experiences emotions and has emotional lobility as a result of the frontal lobe bleed.

We needed to remove the NG tube and get a PEG inserted to make her feeding more practical and when she went back to hospital for the small procedure, we had a CAT scan done of the brain just to ensure that the injuries were healing. The report dated 28/12/2010 reads as follows:

" extensive old infarcts/ evacuated haemorrhages involves the right temporal and parietal lobes associated with focal atrophy. No recent bleed. Old infarcts are also noted in the right frontal lobe inferiorly and left frontal lobe superiorly. Compensatory dilation of the right lateral ventricular system is present. Previous craniotomies noted"

My question to this long background particularly over the last 4 months since the September bleed, is what is the chance of Suzanne being able to recover her speech and being able to move her right side again. Remember, the MRI scan indicates that the left brian is structurally sound and the speech area is clear. Also there is no stroke indicated on the brain stem.

We wait every day for the small steps we have been told to expect but my question is has anyone experienced this type of event and what has the prognosis been? I know that each person is different but there are so many recovery stories which take place over the first 12 months and seem to continue afterwards and this has to be my hope and continue to pray for God's help. She understands what has happenned to her and I cannot imagine what she must be experiencing in trying to tell us what she feels or whatever and this is just not possible to comprehend.

Any comments please.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied February 8th, 2011
[quote="zanne1"]My wife Suzanne 61 years old, had her first major brain haemorrhage involving the right temporal and parietal lobes in March 2010 and after 5 weeks in hospital, after an urgent craniotomy to remove the blood, she went to the rehab unit where after another 5 weeks I took her home. An angiogram was done when she was at the rehab hospital which indicated that all the veins in her brain were normal. The professor diagnosed Amyoloid Angiopathy.
She had the use of her speech, could eat by herself and the use of her right arm and leg. Her spatio visual improved well and she was even starting to do cross word puzzles As the next few months progressed, Suzanne got better with neuro physio and occupational therapy and was getting to the point, where she started to take a few assisted steps and she was hugely positive that she would walk unaided within a few months.

Unfortunately, she had another massive brain haemorrhage in the same area of the brain on the 23 September 2010 and went through the normal trauma of this insult to the brain, surgical intensive care unit with ventilator, venticular drain etc. After 4 weeks, she was admitted to the general ward but this time, she has no movement in ANY of her limbs and is unable to speak. She is able to move her head only. We started neuro physio and occu
|
Did you find this post helpful?