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still getting liver area pain after gallbladder removal

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I had my gallbladder removed feb 2012, since then Ive had 4 more bouts of extreme pain in the same area. The last attack happened yesterday at work and i had to stay in the toilets for almost 2 hours. I had waves of pain & high temp, seeing stars and feeling weak kneed but unable to sit as pain increases. I went back to my GP 1 month after surgery as I'd had 2 more of these attacks but was told I could have "bits of stones working their way through your pipework" it would settle. How long do i have to put up with this before I can be referred for further investigation? Its distressing for others watching me having an attack as they cant help & i havent found a medication that will help apart from morphine, I just have to go through the pain. Any advice would be most appreciated. Rolling Eyes
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First Helper notagain47
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replied May 13th, 2012
Experienced User
I don't find your GP's response very constructive. "Bits of stones" stuck in your bile ducts is not a trivial thing. Retained stones following gallbladder removal are fairly common (although surgeons are increasingly careful about screening for this) and should be treated promptly. It is also possible, although rare, for stones to be produced even without a gallbladder and this should also be treated. Nor should you ignore fever associated with this type of pain. Although feeling hot or clammy is sometimes just a side-effect of the pain, any significant raised temperature means a trip to A&E because it may indicate a life-threatening condition such as pancreatitis, and infection, or or some other complication of the surgery.

There are of course a number of other things that could be causing your pain. Your GP has simply guessed what the issue might be, In many cases, the cause of this sort of post-surgical pain isn't clear and it does often settle down. It may simply be that your original symptoms were not being caused by your gallstones or by the gallbladder itself, and obviously that will not go away on its own.
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Users who thank iann for this post: notagain47 

replied May 13th, 2012
many thanks for your advice, and more importantly your support! i'll arrange another appmnt with my GP.
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replied June 22nd, 2012
I read an article about a woman that was having pain like your having. Her bile duct was damaged during surgery. If the pain continues she said that it was urgent to get the problem fixed by a bile and liver specialist.
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replied May 27th, 2012
had my gallblader removed in sept 2011 been haveing attac this last time had to go to ER my liver inzimes were so high i got johndus had 2 stay for 4 day to get it down Have no stones in the bowel duct they did mri and said nothing was wrong but my bowel duct was 3 times the size it should be now they want me to see a doc in roanoke by the name dc yates they said if johndus comes back to go to ER now they have to refur me to this dc and that was on may 23 2012 and they have never called about app yet and i cant just keep going to the ER every time i start to hurt i would think if ur liver is trying to shut down thats a big problem they said my bowel duct is still trying to work and the musel has to be cut
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replied May 27th, 2012
Experienced User
There is a relatively rare condition where the sphincter at the end of the bile duct doesn't work properlyknown as Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction. It may clamp shut and block the bile duct completely which will cause pain, distended ducts (when there is no gallbladder), liver function tests off the chart (even if there is nothing actually wrong with the liver), and ultimately jaundice.

Because the duct is shared with the pancreas you may also get pancreatitis which can be very serious. You should certainly go the the emergency room if you have any signs of yellowing (skin or eyes) or a high fever associated with the pain (possible pancreatitis), otherwise your choice whether you can deal with the pain.

You may also get diarrhoea when this happens as you won't be able to digest fat properly. I don't know of any clearcut recommendations for a diet that will help reduce the attacks. It is worth trying to lower your fat intake, eat regular meals, and eat more often and less at each meal. Known triggers for attacks are stress, stimulants like caffeine, some drugs including morphine and vitamins, alcohol, and vigorous exercise.

You may be able to try certain drugs to control the muscle behaviour but very often the solution is a minor surgery. The specialist will determine just what the best approach is in your case. It can be difficult to get a full cure of this condition and you may have to permanently adjust your diet after treatment.
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replied June 2nd, 2012
My sister had her GB removed about 3 years ago and has had nothing but trouble. She is nauseaus most of the time and can't eat raw fruits or vegetables. They can cause her extreme pain where her gall bladder was then gets diarrhea a few days later. Been to the ER 3 times and they don't find anything. Does anyone else have this problem and any idea what is causing this?
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replied October 21st, 2014
Once the gall bladder is removed the bile is no longer being stored and there is not sufficient amounts to digest fats during a meal. Yet fats are extremely important for health. It is important that a person consume at least 500mg of bile salts per meal to aid digestion. As a preventative measure it is important to take 1000mg of the amino acid taurine per day to help reduce further stone formation.
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