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steroids and conceiving

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My boyfriend and I want to have a baby together. He uses steroids and I want to know if that will effect the baby at all?
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replied May 17th, 2009
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I could not find any information on the affects of steroids on a child if the father takes steroids. However,that may not even be an issue for you. He may not be able to father children if he has been on steroids for a long time. Strangely enough, the same steroids that make a man ultra masculine with bulging muscles can feminize a man in other ways. Long term steroid use can result in a man developing breasts, shrunken testicles, impotency, decreased testosterone,and decrease in sperm cell production. Some of these side effects are reversable within a few months of going off steroids.
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replied May 18th, 2009
well i know it affects sperm count and all that. as far as the shrunken testicles that only happens when you are cycled on. As soon as you cycle off they go back to normal.
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replied May 18th, 2009
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That's what I said- some of the side effects only occur after long term use and some of them are reversible. I hope your boyfriend does not have any of these issues.
Good luck and happy baby making!
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replied June 21st, 2009
my boyfriend has been taking steroids for around 2 years, and i have just found out that im pregnant. we werent using any contreception as i thought that the steroids would affect his sperm, but obviously this isnt the case. i was worried the steroids may affect the baby but the doctor said its survival of the fittest and the affected sperm will not make it anywhere near the egg.
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Users who thank lucinda85 for this post: crabs 

replied December 30th, 2009
Everything is fine
Im am walkin proof it doesnt. My wife and I had a great healthy son 6 weeks ago and aside from his rapid body growth and appetitie he's perfectly normal.
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replied May 5th, 2013
I just found out I am 8 weeks preg and my boyfriend has been on and off steroids and just recently back on it 6weeks ago.. he's conviencing me to take termination as he reckons the baby will have problems etc.. I read some comments and discovered I can do an ultra screen for the first trimester for any down syndrome affects.. I dont want to go through termination again.. I suggest for the ladies in the house to proceed with this test if you are really conncerned about your parnter on steroid.... good luck xoxoxoxox
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replied May 5th, 2013
I just found out I am 8 weeks preg and my boyfriend has been on and off steroids and just recently back on it 6weeks ago.. he's conviencing me to take termination as he reckons the baby will have problems etc.. I read some comments and discovered I can do an ultra screen for the first trimester for any down syndrome affects.. I dont want to go through termination again.. I suggest for the ladies in the house to proceed with this test if you are really conncerned about your parnter on steroid.... good luck xoxoxoxox
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replied September 27th, 2013
At the age of 25 I became pregnant with my second child. Being so close and so in love with my first daughter, it was hard to imagine how I could love another child just as much.

Through both my pregnancies, I was aware that the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that all pregnant women be offered a screening test for Down Syndrome, regardless of the womans age. Screening may be a maternal blood test done in the first trimester (at 11 to 13 weeks of pregnancy) along with a special ultrasound to measure the thickness at the back of the babies neck (called nuchal translucency). Or it can be a maternal blood test done in the second trimester (at 15 to 20 weeks) without the ultrasound (1). I missed both appointments, totally just spaced them. They would be the only two appointments I would miss.

Not knowing, that about 1 in 700 (or 6,000) babies are born with Down Syndrome each year in the United States, and that there are more than 400,000 individuals with Down Syndrome living in the United States (2), I was not to concerned with missing those appointments. No big deal if I missed blood work I told myself. I thought if something was wrong with my baby they would know already. Thinking I was only 25 years old and had already had one healthy child why would this pregnancy be any different.

After a few complications and a few weeks ahead of schedule, Mia was going to be brought into my world via caesarean. After being unusually nervous that something was terribly wrong ( intuition ), a new life was born.

However, my heart sank and my mind raced. That anticipating sound of a screeching cry that typically feels a mothers eyes with tears and a mothers heart with joy was not heard. It felt like somebody pushed the mute button in the operating room. Instead whispers where starting to feel the room. And one of the operating staff members informed me, she wasn't breathing and they held her up quickly for me to see her and she was then just as quickly out of sight. But what I saw was not the healthy baby I had expected to see. The moments I imagined of having taking pictures of her all bundled up next to me where just that -- an imagination. Those precious first moments where not going to happen.

At my first glimpse of Mia, I saw a tiny body enriched in the color of purple. Dark purple. She was loosing oxygen to her brain and as I tried to stay as focused and calm as possible, as I tried to listen to the whispering that was going on between the nurses and doctors, I was quickly starting to feel the effects from the morpheme and the loss of blood.

As I waited in the recovery room, still in and out from being highly medicated I realized my mother was not in the room. My sisters and dad and friends were all around me but my mom was not. I sent my best friend out after her. I remember her walking back in and the babies father and my best friend waking back into the room behind her. They were all in tears. It was very hard for me to try and wrap my mind around what was going on. About that time, approximately eight NICU staff members including a neonatualagist entered the room and came to my bedside. I recall trying to understand what the hell is a neonatualagist? I know they said a few words to me that I don't recall before they uttered the words, "Your baby shows characteristics of Down Syndrome." I can't tell you if they left the room after that or if they stayed for a few minutes discussing and trying to explain what they just informed me of. I had never cried so hard. I didn't even know what Down Syndrome really meant. I honestly had no clue.

I quickly learned she had multiple health problems. I was not able to see my baby girl not able to touch or kiss or smell her until she was two days old due to the anestishia.

On the third day I was wheeled into the NICU. I was only allowed to place my arm inside a incubator to touch her tiny little body that was hooked to machines and monitors. The next eight days I lived inside that NICU unit.

Almost any day, I can be found doing research on anything relating to Down Syndrome. Before every doctors appointment, before ever therapy session I gather my questions and concerns. I record all therapy sessions and work with Mia physically on a daily basis. Life with Down Syndrome has only required more knowledge and more attention from me.

Over the last nine months I have had the privilege to witness the impossible become possible. Every health complication she was born with has subsided. Twice a month, physical therapist, occupational therapist as well as vision specialist and nutritionist are in our home evaluating Mia's progress and teaching me techniques to improve her skills. She is beyond her age in some categories and at her level in others. She started rolling over at 21 days and has yet to quit.

I quickly decided to get involved with any program available to me. I am now apart of DSOSN organization where families alike support each other and share their stories. We discuss how we can improve situations. And one issue I hope to change is nobody came to the hospital to explain to me about the shock I was in. There was nobody there to tell me that everything was going to be ok. No one was there to ask the right questions to the specialist. Nobody was there to tell me about support groups and to tell me I had to be the biggest advocate for my child. We also share our stories with all who will listen. Having a child born with DS is more common than you'd think. It could be your child. And as a mom of a child with DS, we want people to know that it is okay. With the support of DSOSN I hope to accomplish that change for future parents and to be there to provide them the support that is so very much needed.

I have been told that I have received the most loving and non judgmental individual there could ever be. I have as well been told that I have been dealt a bad had. That I have been given a burden, a life of difficulty.

The biggest difficulty I face is knowing she has been placed in a world where people look at her flat facial features, the extra folds of skin around her eyes and not notice she is a human being. She has a heart and she expresses feelings. She has her own opinion and will have abilities to do many extradorniary things in her life. To the people that say they feel sorry for what life has thrown at me, I tell them I feel sorry for the people who don't have to work as hard as she will to prove themselves that those people have a upper hand to succeed but yet do nothing but criticize and judge another. That to me is a waist. Not life with Down Syndrome.

I am mother of two children. I am not a mother of a Down Syndrome child but a child with Down Syndrome. I will advocate for her and hope to change the view that has been casted down towards the individuals with Down Syndrome. She needs love and care like any individual. I will go to school to become a Special Education teacher in hopes that my experience with raising a child with Special Needs, will benefit the needs of other children with special needs. I will live a life full of Dr. appointments and un-known possibilities. I will live a life of stares and unpleasant comments. I will live the Down Syndrome life because that is my life and that is who I am.






1. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). Screening for Fetal Chromosomal Abnormalities. ACOG Practice Bulletin, number 77, January 2007.
2. National Down Syndrome Society. Information Topics. Accessed 4/20/09.
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