Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Orthopedics Forum

shoulder replacement surgery (Page 3)

Must Read
Think you might be experiencing bone loss? Check out this Intro to Osteoporosis and evaluate your risk for developing bone weakness. ...
Although bone mass loss is normal as we age, some people are more at risk of developing osteoporosis than others. Are you at risk? More here....
Do you have severe back pain? Do your bones break frequently or with little pressure? You might be experiencing osteoporosis. Found out more here....

April 18th, 2011
Hope some of you will find this encouraging. I shattered both shoulders in a seizure after a head injury, and had total replacements for both. That was in 1981. After 30 years, the left one is working fine, and I can lift my arm almost vertically. The right joint gave way four years ago and was replaced with a new one. I can only lift that arm shoulder high. I am most grateful to the surgeons involved as I would have remained seriously handicapped but for them. I have no pain in either shoulder. Cheers
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied April 18th, 2011
Especially eHealthy
patterdale,

Thank you for posting. It is very rare for someone with a good outcome to post, as most often, it is only the ones who are not doing very well that post to complain. As a result, most people get a skewed idea about how successful most surgeries really are.

To have shoulder replacements done in 1981, is remarkable, as they were still in the experimental stage then. Hips came about in the 40's, with the Charnley hip (the most successful prosthesis ever made) and knees around the 60's. And, to have them last this long is a testament to you not abusing the joints.

Great story. Good luck in the future.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied May 8th, 2011
I'm a mom of 5 kids, the youngest being 3! I tripped over our cat, broke my foot and shattered my shoulder in 3 places! My experience has been hell from the emt's to the ER, to the on call Dr! My Dr, I'm told, is a great Dr, but his "bed side manners suck"! I have had alot of pain w/the muscle being so tight...it feels like it's a bone! Of course he wouldn't do anything for me, just tells me that I need to quit taking pain meds and work harder at PT, this is week 4 after surgery! I looked on here b/c I thought maybe it was just me, that I wasn't working hard enough, thanks for posting this, now I know that it's not just me...others are having the same troubles! I don't wish this on anyone, I'm 38yrs old...I want more than anything to be mom to my kids, the depression, the pain, the feeling of worthlessness...Drs need to listen to us, it's our bodies we know how we feel!
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Users who thank hurtingmommy for this post: onceagain 

replied September 6th, 2011
Thank you for your post! I just found this forum the other day, I am trying to find a way out of this hole I have found myself in... I also feel so extremely worthless, I have been so entrapped by my pain, depression, and a complete mental fog. I have had to practically "staight arm" my 5 year son everytime he wants to play or fight, which is about all the time.
How did you manage this with your children? I know it is different being a mom vs being a dad, relating to the physical side of play and contact. Are there any dads out there that have simular experiences? I could sure some help right now, thank you in advance!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied December 13th, 2011
I broke my humerous bone and had fixation surgery a year ago and then the bone died. The next round was a reverse shoulder replacement in August. I am able to play my guitar again and most things below shoulder level but I just can't do the exercises without great pain. I have finally decided to just give up on the PT and just hope for the best. Every time I try to gain back some strength the shoulder flares up and I'm miserable for 3 or 4 weeks. I had a great deal of depression at first but I believe it was a result of the drugs they gave me. The doctor just says it will eventually get better. I feel like there is a tight band going around my shoulder and everytime I try to move it gets super tight and hurts like hell. It does make me feel a little better that I am not the only one who is having problems after surgery.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 31st, 2011
My grandmother (age 76) had shoulder replacement surgery 4 weeks ago and is in tremendous pain, which sounds consistent with what I've read here. Some things she's said sound wierd to us though. She said the doctor said they only make replacement shoulders for men and that her bones are especially small (would never guess it by looking at her - 5'9" former factory worker!), so the shoulder is large for her - anyone else hear this? She wonders if this contributes to the pain? Also, they put a screw in to hold things together while healing, but it is too long (again "due to small bones"), it sticks out from the bone causing painful scar tissue already. Anyone else experience this? Doc says he can remove it once she's healed if it still causes pain.
Thanks.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied July 31st, 2011
Especially eHealthy
Jen_Hen,

Actually, women make up a significant portion of both total joint and hemiarthroplasty shoulder patients.

The prostheses come in a variety of sizes, though if a patient is exceptionally small (or large), either a custom prosthesis has to be made, or the surgeon can try to use the closest one (if it will work).


As to the screw, every system is a little different. Sometimes, extra fixation has to be used to stabilize the glenoid component (or possibly bone graft if it was used). The fixation is usually left in place unless it is causing a lot of problems.


At 4 weeks, she should be getting to the point of the shoulder not hurting much anymore. Since she is still in the same amount of pain, as she was at first, then she needs to be evaluated for infection, failure of the components to incorporate (though it is still a little early for that), fracture of the underlying bone stock, malalignment, etc. Especially, if she is not making any progress.

Though it is not a good idea to change surgeons in the middle (like changing horses midstream), if the surgeon just will not take the complaints seriously, then she may have to get a second opinion.

If she is making progress, all be it slowly, then she may want to give it a little more time.

This is something that she will have to decide. Good luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied April 2nd, 2012
Advice to those considering shoulder replacement
I am 53 and have had a partial (2004) and full (2012) replacement of my left shoulder joint. Both were difficult surgeries but reasonably successful (significant reduction in pain and significant improvement in function but not perfection in either). I do also have significant soft tissue damage and extensive scarring dating back to my original motorcycle injury in 1977.

My advice to those who are considering shoulder joint replacement surgery. First, don't rush into it. See several specialists (the best you can get to) for alternative treatments and don't do the surgery until you have exhausted other options and the pain or lack of function are seriously limiting your life. Second, get the best shoulder surgeon you can even if it means traveling a significant distance to see him. You may have more time and the expense of travel for 6 - 8 trips but do some research. You will see that the more experienced surgeons have significantly better outcomes, shorter hospital stays, fewer complications and fewer infections. Your choice of a surgeon is the single most important decision you will make! Third, follow your surgeons instructions to the letter and do your rehab! Surgeon is most important for successful surgery, rehab is most important for successful recovery. And finally, if you have problems and continue to have problems and your surgeon can not address them or puts you off, SEE ANOTHER DOCTOR!!! Don't live in misery for months or years when another doctor may be able to help you. But again, see the best doctor you can even if you must travel some distance to see him/her.

I wish anyone reading this the best of luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 1st, 2012
Do you have names of Surgeons you would recc.and where they can be found
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied April 2nd, 2012
About expectations: If you are one of those people who are into sports that are very hard on the joints and are hoping to have your joint replacement and resume those sports, I would like to give you some advice that you may not want to hear. First, no artificial joint will work as well as a healthy natural joint EVER. Second, any replacement of a replacement joint has much higher risks involved and much less satisfactory outcomes than initial replacements. Third, ARTIFICIAL JOINTS WEAR OUT and like most other things, the more you use them and the harder you use them, the faster they wear out.

Those are the facts. Hopefully we will come up with better artificial joints with longer wearing materials in the future but so far that has not happened and some efforts to do so (like metal-on-metal knee and hip joints) have caused major problems for patients. Until things change the facts stated above are what you have to deal with. You have to balance the short-term issues of quality of life with the long-term issues of making your artificial joint last. The good thing is that you don't have to drop all activities or anything so drastic. Talk to your doctor about the types of activities that are hardest on your joint and consider sports that will be less harmful. You can still have a full and active life but making a few changes and giving up a few activities could make all the difference in whether or not you are back for more surgery in a few years or in a couple of decades.

Good luck!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied April 5th, 2012
Shoulder ball replacement
I'm so glad I found this site. I'm a 67 yr. old woman who fell in my driveway and damaged everything on my left side. I crushed my shoulder ball and had to have replacement surgery plus rotator cuff repair on emergency basis. It's been 4 months and after PT I can only lift my arm waist high out front and to the side. I am in almost constant pain in my deltoid muscle. The shoulder rarely hurts unless they are aggressive with PT. I am now having knife stabbing pain in my right back shoulder blade due to over use. It would be interesting to hear from some of the people who posted in ' 09 and '10 as to their progress now in 2012. I can understand the depression, worthlessness, and pain all are going thru. I have severe pain in my back and can only stand about 10 minutes before my leg goes numb. So in addition to this, now i have the shoulder thing going on. The doctor said from the beginning I would never get full use of my shoulder but I desperately need to be able to set my hair! Is this something I can look forward to? My husband of 50 years says he's not a hairdresser! I wish the best for all of you who are in pain.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied May 1st, 2012
Hi Its 18 mths since my operation im still having a lot of pain sleepless nights and bad depression. You said about doing your own hair, well thats something i havent been able to do for 18 mths. I feel so useless and wothless ive got a very loving, patient husband who is my main career I also need to have 2 knee replacements done which they wont do at the moment as my shoulders are to bad and i wont be able to use the crutches easily. I get all the knife stabbing pains in my shoulder and shoulder blade and still havent got good use of my arm. A lot of the housework i still cant do. But recently ive been getting pain down in my forearm and wrist and i cant find a Dr. that takes me seriously. All the pain medication either makes me sleepy or constipated. Why or why cant Dr. listen to us and take us more seriously, after all we know our own bodies.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 1st, 2012
Hi thelemon
I am 68 yr old woman, very active and a golfer who also fell and my life will never be the same. I too had a partial Shoulder replacement in April 2012 due to a fall. I broke my humerous bone,tore rotator cuff and ligaments. They replaced the ball, repaired ligaments and the rotator cuff. It has been over 5 months since surgery and I still have pain with PT and if I do too much.
My ROM is not too bad. I can lift arm above my head and a little above my waist to the side.
This has been the hardest thing I have ever experianced but I am seeing improvement very slowly.
I know how hard it is to do your hair, I still can't do it. A lot of things I still can't do.
I guess we have to think that no matter how bad it is there is always someone else worst then us.
Take care
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied April 23rd, 2012
Hi Everyone! I also am glad to find this site - there does seem to be a period when you feel completely on your own after this particular operation - perhaps because it is not so common - ?
I had a Copeland shoulder replacement just over four months ago, in December 2011, and am aged 56. I have been constantly told that I am young for the operation, and just feel that it is nice to be young for anything these days!
I am struggling a bit, but am very, very determined to do everything and anything in my power to achieve the best outcome possible.
thelemon - you are totally on my wavelength! I have not been to the hairdresser since before the operation, and am desperate to be able to do my hair. For the first three months I let it just dry naturally, and then for about two weeks my saintly husband put large rollers in the back - and now, hurray!! for the last two times, I have struggled - but have managed to put them in myself. I put a TV on the floor next to me, and wedged my elbow on the top and forced my arm up to the top of my head. I am absolutely scared stiff that I will not improve any more than I have already. Sorry guys for the female talk.....
The first six weeks were quite hard - mainly because I had to wear a sling permanently - and sleeping was impossible. But I started physio the day after the operation. VERY gently. I had the operation in Reading, England, in the actual hospital where Mr Copeland works and invented the Copeland Shoulder. So the hospital, staff and physio department all specialise in shoulder replacements. I have seen the physio every two weeks since then. I complete my physio exercises every day.
There are definite plateaus that you hit, where you do not seem to be improving at all. It took me over three months to be able to drive, but mainly because it was my left shoulder, and I could not change gear in the car. I also think that as I am right handed, this has actually meant that I do not use it as much naturally - so I am trying to use it much more.
I started swimming about a month ago, and then about two weeks ago I started back on the gym equipment. I can reach about 140 degrees upwards as long as I haul the arm up with my other arm or equipment. I am trying to get the movement and rotation first, and am now working on building the muscles up.
It has been very, very hard, and is still hard. Much harder than I ever imagined or was told. But what is done, is done. I am determined to improve as much as I can. And no-one else can do it for me. So - sleeves rolled up - onwards and upwards!
All the best to everyone from here in England. x
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 28th, 2012
Partial Shoulder Replacement
Hi I fell on Dec. 5, 2011 but didn't have the surgery until April 26, 2012. I had a partial shoulder replacement because I broke the bone below the ball, tore the rotator cuff and ligaments. They replaced the ball, repaired the rotator cuff and ligaments. This has been to worst thing I have ever gone through. After reading all of these I wish I could hear from some that have had really good results. I am a golfer and really do miss my life before I fell. My ROM is getting better but I am worried if I will ever have full use of the arm.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 5th, 2012
I had TSR in December of 2012 and can still only get my arm straight out at the waist. Can prop it up and reach my hair, but it aches all the time and feels so tight. It seems to be getting worse instead of better. At least after reading this forum, I know that I am not an exception to the rule. I think I am going to call and make an appointment and have the doctor xray it. The doctors in my small town are not believers in a lot of pain meds and the over the counter stuff just doesn't cut it. I wish I had my old shoulder back~!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 6th, 2012
Hi Southernstar. I had TSR after a nasty fall to the asphalt from the back of a 4 wheel drive truck at my fav antique store. Surgery was done on May 4, 2012 and I still feel helpless. PT helps but I don't think I'm making the progress needed. My doctor told me that he expects me to have reached 90% rotation by next Tuesday. I absolutely know this isn't going to happen in the next 4 days. I can't rotate my arm anywhere near that. I can't fix my hair, I am depressed,sad, and gaining weight. I feel like I've aged 10 years in 2 months. I too, am in a small southern town where the doc tells me to control the pain with tylenol and when i told him i couldn't sleep, he rec.benadryl. benadryl does nothing for me. i fell like i've lost a major part of my life. i am a teacher and part time caterer and cake decorator. i can't do my cakes anymore which has severely affected my creative side. i too, wish i had my shoulder back and wish i could relive that afternoon of the accident. i would have gone shopping for clothes instead of antiques as was my first inclination. ; 0
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 6th, 2012
Hi Southernstar. I had TSR after a nasty fall to the asphalt from the back of a 4 wheel drive truck at my fav antique store. Surgery was done on May 4, 2012 and I still feel helpless. PT helps but I don't think I'm making the progress needed. My doctor told me that he expects me to have reached 90% rotation by next Tuesday. I absolutely know this isn't going to happen in the next 4 days. I can't rotate my arm anywhere near that. I can't fix my hair, I am depressed,sad, and gaining weight. I feel like I've aged 10 years in 2 months. I too, am in a small southern town where the doc tells me to control the pain with tylenol and when i told him i couldn't sleep, he rec.benadryl. benadryl does nothing for me. i fell like i've lost a major part of my life. i am a teacher and part time caterer and cake decorator. i can't do my cakes anymore which has severely affected my creative side. i too, wish i had my shoulder back and wish i could relive that afternoon of the accident. i would have gone shopping for clothes instead of antiques as was my first inclination. ; 0
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 6th, 2012
tsr
Hi Southernstar. I had TSR after a nasty fall to the asphalt from the back of a 4 wheel drive truck at my fav antique store. Surgery was done on May 4, 2012 and I still feel helpless. PT helps but I don't think I'm making the progress needed. My doctor told me that he expects me to have reached 90% rotation by next Tuesday. I absolutely know this isn't going to happen in the next 4 days. I can't rotate my arm anywhere near that. I can't fix my hair, I am depressed,sad, and gaining weight. I feel like I've aged 10 years in 2 months. I too, am in a small southern town where the doc tells me to control the pain with tylenol and when i told him i couldn't sleep, he rec.benadryl. benadryl does nothing for me. i fell like i've lost a major part of my life. i am a teacher and part time caterer and cake decorator. i can't do my cakes anymore which has severely affected my creative side. i too, wish i had my shoulder back and wish i could relive that afternoon of the accident. i would have gone shopping for clothes instead of antiques as was my first inclination. ; 0
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 7th, 2012
I, aalso used to do the cake decorating and I also did ceramics. Stopped dong both when shoulder started acting up. Waited a year or so and then had a botched Rotator repair which led to the TSR a year later. Less than three onths after TSR, i fell in Belize and reinjured the shoulder as well as broke my nose. SO much for that cruise! At least it wasn't dislocated, but has really hindered my progress. I am getting used to my new normal of using the left arm for so much more. Let me know how the PT goes next week.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 7th, 2012
Hi again. Man your luck sounds worse than mine. The only good thing to come from all of this is that I have slowed down quite a bit. That's something our good Lord had been telling me to do for a long time.my sweet hubby took me on a weeklong vacay to the beach and my sister has taken me on a week long trip to baltimore and d.c. to try and cheer me up.im in baltimore now and have enjoyed both of these trips but the pain is so bad at night and I feel soooooo old and helpless. Ill be fifty next month and hate to think im going to be in this state of being for the rest of my life. I enjoyed the cakes and decorating soooooooo much. I hope I can get back to it.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 7th, 2012
Hi again. Man your luck sounds worse than mine. The only good thing to come from all of this is that I have slowed down quite a bit. That's something our good Lord had been telling me to do for a long time.my sweet hubby took me on a weeklong vacay to the beach and my sister has taken me on a week long trip to baltimore and d.c. to try and cheer me up.im in baltimore now and have enjoyed both of these trips but the pain is so bad at night and I feel soooooo old and helpless. Ill be fifty next month and hate to think im going to be in this state of being for the rest of my life. I enjoyed the cakes and decorating soooooooo much. I hope I can get back to it. I go back to therapy on Tuesday morning and then the doc that afternoon.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 8th, 2012
Hey Kallie, sounds like we have a lot in common. I live on the East Coast and it sounds as maybe you do to. I was at the beach for a week June24-July 1 and was in DC for a few days last week. It was so hot there I can't say I enjoyed it a lot. Next trip is not until Sept. Will be headed to the mountains of TN. I have to go back to the doctor in a couple for weeks for six months checkup and I know he will not be happy with my progress. Oh well, neither am I. LOL
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 8th, 2012
Hi Southernstar. We certainly do have a lot in common. I live near the east coast in ga. We went to the west coast of fl. at capethe san blasblas from june 23 thru june 30. Exactly one hour after unpacking at our condo, tropical storm debbie hit us head on.it was a very stormy few nights and then Tuesday morning the sun came out and we had a great week. Upon getting home that Sunday, my sister called and we flew to baltimore the next day. Im on my way home now. Like you, baltimore and dc were too hot to enjoy.especially wearing a sling and in pain.I know my doc isn't going to be happy with two whole weeks without official pt. I've been doing it on my own but its nothing likewhat they do.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied July 26th, 2012
Hi, My brother had a shoulder ball replacement surgery 3 years ago. However, he still has a constant pain in the shoulder area. He can do all work with that hand, but the pain never goes. It increases if more work like lifting heavy things, or typing for almost 4-5 hours straight (which is usual with his job). Why should this be so...?
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 1st, 2012
Looking for orthopedic surgeon who specialized in shoulder replacements. If anyone has names and where i would Appreciate it...thanks
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied October 1st, 2012
Especially eHealthy
alex02220,

You might want to contact the ASES - American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons. This is an association of surgeons who specialize in surgery of the shoulder and elbow. Again, you might want to contact their office and ask for a list of shoulder surgeons in your area.

The AAOS (American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons) might also be able to give you a list of shoulder surgeons in your area.


You can also contact the local orthopedic society in your area and ask if there are any members who specialize in shoulder surgery. If you live in a large city, which has a medical school, you can also contact its orthopedic department with the same question.


There are many, many well known shoulder surgeons around. Some of the Big Names include:

Charlie Rockwood, MD - UTSA, San Antonio
Fred Matsen III, MD - UW, Seattle
Louis Bigliani, MD - Columbia U, New York
Berny Morrey, MD - Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Frank Jobe, MD - USC, Los Angeles

-to name just a few.

But, there are a lot of very good shoulder surgeons out there and you need to find one that is a good fit for you.

Good luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied October 2nd, 2012
some one pls help.... pls reply to my query
|
Did you find this post helpful?

User Profile
replied October 2nd, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Sam_27,

While hemiarhtroplasty of the shoulder (just replacing the humeral head or ball of the shoulder) is quite good for restoration of function of the shoulder, it cannot make a shoulder joint "normal". It can make a damaged joint better, but again, not the way it was when the patient was a youngster.

If could be that your brother has some degenerative arthritis in the glenoid (the socket), so that replacing just the ball did not take care of that. Or it has developed since the hemiarthroplasty was placed.

He could be having problems in the soft tissues around the joint. Usually, hemiarthroplasties are done for four part humeral head fractures, which cause a lot of damage to the surrounding soft tissues as well as breaking the bone. He could have developed scar tissue in the rotator cuff and other tissues which hold the shoulder in place.

You state that he has pain after typing for 4 or 5 hours straight. It may be that he needs to take frequent breaks from that activity during the day. he should not wait till the shoulder is hurting before stopping. It is usually recommended that patients who do a lot of typing or data entry, that they take a break to stretch and relax for a couple of minutes every hour. They should also do a "stretch in place" at the end of each document they are working on (rotating the neck, shoulders, stretching the arms, etc while sitting) before continuing to the next document.


There are a lot of reasons for the continuing of discomfort after major joint injury/surgery. If it is bothering him enough to alter his usual activities, then he should have it checked out by his orthopedic surgeon.

Good luck.
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Users who thank Gaelic for this post: Sam_27 

replied February 13th, 2013
I had Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis since I was 3 years old. My parents refused to treat it for various reasons. By the time I was 19 years old my joints were literally falling apart. I had my first two knee bi-later knee replacements done at the age of 19. I had 5 surgeries in college and still managed to graduate with my class.

I could not get the care I needed in Florida, as the idiot doctors there all believed I was too young. At that time I had already had 9 replacements and the doctors were totally ignoring me. So, my loving hubby went to the Library,(no computers back then for research) and found out that Vanderbilt Medical Center was 4th in the nation. We set the surgery and moved. We never looked back.

All of my surgeries have to be custom built due to the tiny size of my joints. I rarely have a "normal revision" as my RA is so complicated. I am generally the "guinea pig" for most surgeries and I no longer even have a bone in my right arm. During my shoulder surgery they had to take out the little bone I had(size of a pencil lead) and they put in a titanium rod that has acted as bone for the last 9 years.My left elbow has had the elbow joint taken out. I was the 4th in the United States and the first one for my doctor to have this surgery done.

I don't have to tell you I live in chronic pain, but I work hard to not let my disability stop me. I volunteer with abused children thru our court system and I am still happily married after almost 32 years of marriage.

I want to encourage others here to do your best to keep going. If a doctor tells you nothing can be done, find another doctor! I am living proof that generally there is something that can be done. My surgeons are world known and I only hope I die before they stop practicing.

I learned the hard way, find specialists! No doctor can do "it all" ! Trust me, I know what I am talking about! lol Your health is too important to allow your small town doctor to operate on you. Find the best!
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied March 4th, 2013
TSR - 2 of them within a year!
I've had both shoulders replaced. (Right - January 2006; Left - December 2006) I have avascular necrosis of the major joints. The only pain I have is "weather" ache. I'm truly sorry so many of you have had bad luck with your surgeries. I am one of the fortunate ones. I started my own therapy at home within a month of both of my surgeries. As soon as the doctor said the "bump pillow" could go and only use if I overwork the shoulder, I started in the shower with "up and down" walking the wall to clean the shower. The next month I used a roller paint brush and painted my entire house outside taking care not to overdo it. On the 3rd month - when I went for a checkup he was surprised that I could lift my arm over my head and to shoulder height to the side. I had nearly full range of motion. I did not have physical therapy because I didn't need it! I had both shoulders replaced at the University of Miami. What was my motivator at 51 to do this? I ride a motorcycle and wanted to get back in shape for a trip. Don't give up! Don't only do your therapy at the physical therapy office - DO IT ALL OF THE TIME!
|
Did you find this post helpful?
Quick Reply