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Recovery time after tib/fib fracture? (Page 1)

I am now fully weight-bearing on an internally-fixed broken tib and fib (rod, plate, 9 screws). I am a 30-yr old woman who was hit by a car almost 12 weeks ago. I cannot yet swim because I still have open wounds. I walk with a cane and attend physiotherapy three times a week. There was significant soft tissue and nerve damage, but I'm regaining function.

There's a callus on my tibia, but the fibula ends don't seem to have met yet. What can I do at home to promote bone healing and muscle regeneration? Should I buy an exercise bike? The muscle loss is very disheartening. Spring is two months away and I want to be ready to run and hike.

Will I have to miss a season of motorcycling because of my weak leg?

Are there any motorcyclists online who have broken a leg and gone back to riding? How long did it take?

Any info will be very much appreciated.
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First Helper dolphin888
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replied February 6th, 2012
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Ser25,

The following time frames are usually given for the union of a tibia fracture:

Time to Union for Tibia Fracture:

- low energy fractures: 10-13 weeks;
- high energy fractures: 13-20 weeks;
- open fractures: 16-26 weeks
---- type 3B & 3C open fractures requires 30 to 50 weeks for consolidation;
- distal tibia fractures may be more prone to non union than proximal fractures due to absence of muscular soft tissue envelope;
- in the report by Anne Skoog et al., the authors studied 64 consecutive patients with a tibial shaft fracture; ---> 12 months after the injury, 44 percent had NOT regained full function of the injured leg, although all but two of the patients had returned to preinjury working status;
---- references:---> "One-Year Outcome After Tibial Shaft Fractures: Results of a Prospective Fracture Registry" A Skoog. J Orthop Trauma 15(3):210-215, March/April 2001.


You state that you still have open wounds, was this an open fracture, or are the wounds away from the fracture site. This is because, open fractures take longer to heal than closed fractures.

But, in any case. You are about on track for the union of the bone. But, that is just the first step. All of the soft tissues also have to be rehabilitated. And, that takes a long time. As much as a year to 18 months is some cases.

You are again a little ahead of the curve, in that you are up and weight bearing on the fracture. Weight bearing actually helps the bone heal. This is due to Wolff's Law: bone will respond to the stresses applied to it. This is why the bones of a weight lifter, or a person who does heavy manual labor, are very stout and strong. And the reverse, those who do not use or stress their bones (age, injury, space flight) develop osteoporosis.


As to getting the tissues to heal better, the one most important thing is to NOT smoke or use tobacco products. Nicotine is extremely detrimental to healing tissues. It cuts off the blood supply and oxygen by constricting small blood vessels.

Otherwise, about the only thing you can do is eat a good diet, with increased protein, calcium, and vitamin D. You can take supplements if you wish, but if you eat a proper diet, the money is probably better spent on a good steak and milkshake dinner. As to the vitamin D, the best source is sunshine. A person can get his/her daily recommended amount, by being out in the sun for about 30 minutes a day. And, it is good to get out of the house.


The atrophy of the muscles is from disuse. The only way to reverse the atrophy is to use the muscles. As we tell the athletes, for every day they are out of practice, it takes about two to regain the strength they have lost. You decondition a lot faster than you condition (or get back into shape).


Everyone heals at his/her own rate, so you may get back faster if you work hard in rehabilitation. But, it does take a lot of effort and hard work.


Hang in there. You have made it this far. Keep going.

Good luck.
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replied May 1st, 2012
Spiral tib fib?
Awesome reply. Any thoughts on spiral fractures? I am 2 months post spiral tib fib butterfly fracture and 1 month post intramedullary nail and screw surgery.
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replied February 7th, 2012
Hanging in.
Thanks for the info and encouragement. It was a compound fracture with fragmentation. My lower leg was crushed between two vehicles and I was quite lucky to keep my foot. Thankfully, I was wearing decent boots that kept the fractures away from my ankle.

Circulation is finally decent and I can be up and out of the house. However, I have limited mobility beyond my apartment because of the icy sidewalks. This is why I was thinking of getting a recumbant bike. I'm taking calcium and D supplements almost daily. I don't use tobacco, but I do drink significant volumes of tea and coffee.

I was relatively fit before and I think the outdoor active season is approaching faster than I'm healing. I want my calf and thigh muscles to stop shrinking!

Stories of people taking a year or more to return to their normal level of activity are hard to accept. I want to hear that I can get most of my function back in two more months if I work hard and do the right exercises.

Maybe you'll hear from me in two months that I've started running. Smile
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replied September 24th, 2012
I also had a tib/fib ORIF surger back in March 2010. I was walking with a cane about 2 weeks after surger, and was full weight bearing about 2 months...since then, it took about 7 - 9 months for me to return to full activity..i am a larger man due to the weight lifting, but aside from some residual pain at the fracture site, i have no lasting or lingering problems from the surger..i did not have insurance at the time, so no rehab for me....that should help your recover time significantly...just push yourself as much as you can and you will get back to normal!!!!
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replied August 23rd, 2012
I broke my tib/fib on July 28 had surgery next day. My surgeon tells me 6 to 7 weeks non wieght bearing snd probab 4 to 6 weeks before near normal. I had a titstium rod and a plate with screws installed.Iam now in week 4 waiting for exray in 3 weeks. DOes all this sound realistic?
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replied August 23rd, 2012
I broke my tib/fib on July 28 had surgery next day. My surgeon tells me 6 to 7 weeks non wieght bearing snd probab 4 to 6 weeks before near normal. I had a titstium rod and a plate with screws installed.Iam now in week 4 waiting for exray in 3 weeks. DOes all this sound realistic?
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replied August 24th, 2012
open tib and fib fracture
I cannot believe all the posts i am seeing yous must all be very unlucky! I broke my tib and fib just less than 2 weeks ago. An open fracture wheres the tibia popped out the side. Had an op the next day and had a titanium rod placed in my leg, 2days later i was fully weight bearing on my crutches, 10dats after acccident wounds have healed nicely, stitches out and can hobble (in a fashion) without my crutches. I would ignore most posts online as i would only expect a long recovery time if there is severe ligament damage. 6-8 weeks is the average healing time hope this helps
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replied August 24th, 2012
I cannot believe all the posts i am seeing yous must all be very unlucky! I broke my tib and fib just less than 2 weeks ago. An open fracture wheres the tibia popped out the side. Had an op the next day and had a titanium rod placed in my leg, 2days later i was fully weight bearing on my crutches, 10dats after acccident wounds have healed nicely, stitches out and can hobble (in a fashion) without my crutches. I would ignore most posts online as i would only expect a long recovery time if there is severe ligament damage. 6-8 weeks is the average healing time hope this helps
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replied September 16th, 2012
hi christine here broke tib/fib just above ankle comming up 4weeks to go for xray 3 weeks from now had open wound no cast using walking frame as not to bare weight can any one tell me when i will be able to put foot down and do stairs one at a time can move ankle and move foot back and fourth thankyou
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replied September 16th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Christine,

Sorry about your accident.

You state you had an open wound, so I am assuming that you had an open fracture. You state that you do not have a cast, so I again assume that you had surgery to stabilize the fracture (either an intramedullary (IM) nail or a plate).

Depending upon the Grade of the open fracture, it can take anywhere from about 16 to 50 weeks for consolidation of the fracture. A Grade I and II open fractures usually take from 16 to 26 weeks to unite. The Grade III open fractures, especially the Grade III B and C fractures, can take up to 50 weeks for the bone to completely heal.

These times are just for the bone to unite, it does not include the time for rehabilitation.


Weight bearing on tibia fractures depends upon the stability of the fracture pattern. Transverse fractures are very stable and can sometimes weight bearing can be allowed immediately. Spiral and oblique fractures are very unstable and tend to slide/shorten if weight is applied before significant callus formation has occurred.

So, you will need to ask your surgeon as to when you will be allowed to bear weight. In the meantime, continue to work on range of motion of the ankle and knee. Having full range of motion of these joints will put you just that much ahead when you start rehab.

Stairs, especially down stairs, requires almost full range of motion of the ankle and a significant amount of strength. You are losing muscle strength every day you are not using the leg. So, you will have significant atrophy of the muscles in the calf and thigh. This muscle strength will have to be regained during rehab.


You have quite a ways to go yet. Hopefully, your open fracture was one of the lesser Grades, so that you will be able to heal up faster. But, open tibia fractures are significant injuries, which still carry a fairly high rate of amputation. So, they are nothing to mess around with. Ask your surgeon about your weight bearing status.


Once your wounds are completely healed, you might want to look into getting into a pool for therapy. The warmth of the water makes the tissues more pliable and the buoyancy makes the exercises nonweight bearing (in chest deep water). You can work on range of motion and strengthening in the water. You might ask your surgeon about it.


Good luck. Work hard in therapy.
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replied September 29th, 2012
After Reading the above comments, I have to admit I am concerned. In April, I suffered from a spiral tibia fracture and distal fibula fracture, while at roller skating. I had surgery with in 4 days of my injury. I had a Intramedullary nailing with a total of 4 screws. It took about 3 months or so to get off crutches, It has now been almost 6 mo. I am at full weight bearing,but still walk with a limp and have some intermittent pain near the break area.I still have issues with swelling and pain if standing for periods over 30min. It is still uncomfortable to sit without elevating my leg. I did go to therapy for 6 weeks, but did not find it helpful. I do attempt some light weight work out at the gym about 3 times a week. My Concern is that I don't seem to be healing as quickly as some of the others in this forum.
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replied September 29th, 2012
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nursechick77,

First you have to determine if the bone has completely untied. By definition, if a fracture has not fully united by six months, it is considered a nonunion.

So, in cases where a tib-fib fracture has been statically locked (IM nail and interlocking screws at both ends) and the fracture is still not fully united by six months, usually the nail is dynamized. This is done by removing the interlocking screws at one end.

When the fracture is statically locked, the construct is considered a load shielding one. When the screws are removed at one end, it becomes dynamic and is considered a load sharing construct.

Then with weight bearing there will be more stress applied across the fracture site. The extra stress and compression of the fracture will stimulate the body to lay down more callus and finish uniting the fracture. This is known as Wolff’s Law - bone will respond to the stresses applied to it.

So, if your fracture has not united, you might want to speak to your surgeon about dynamizing the nail.


However, if the bone is fully healed, they you need to find out what is causing the discomfort at the fracture site. It is not uncommon for patients to have tenderness in the soft tissues around the fracture during rehabilitation. Not just the bone is injured when a fracture occurs. The periosteum is torn apart, the muscles are ripped off of their attachments, and the fascia, tendons, ligaments, neurovascular structures all get stretched and twisted while the leg is unsupported by bone. All of this soft tissue damage has to heal and it heals with scar tissue. That scar has to mature and soften.

So, again, dull aching pain is quite common during the recovery phase after long bone fractures. Sharp, intense pain directly at the fracture site, though, needs to be evaluated.

It is also quite common for patients to have continued problems with swelling and edema in the limb. Both the venous blood and the lymphatic fluid systems require muscle action to return to the body core. Also, both of these systems’ “tubes” have been disrupted by the injury and both have to reconstitute new veins and channels. It is not uncommon for patients to have problems for a year or so after significant injury, especially if they have not returned to full activity yet.


As to the limp, that can come from three things: pain, decreased range of motion, and/or decreased strength. Each of these has to be corrected. The pain was discussed above. If you still do not have full range of motion in the ankle, knee, or hip that needs to be addressed. If your injured leg is not yet as strong as your uninjured leg, then you will need to work on regaining strength. Atrophy of the muscles occurs very fast in tibia fractures and it takes a lot of dedicated weight work to get that resolved. It will not just happen on its own.

This is why it is not uncommon for it to take a year to 18 months to fully recover from a tibia fracture.


If you are having problems working out on your fractured limb, you might look into doing some therapy in a swimming pool. Walking and working in chest deep water is essentially nonweight bearing so you can really work on range of motion and do strengthening exercises. The warmth of the water makes the soft tissues more pliable and stretchable. In some pools, you can even use a weighted vest and run in the deep end of the pool (many athletes will do this to stay in shape even though they have a lower extremity injury).


So, again, it can take a year to 18 months to recover from a tibia fracture. If your bone is not completely united, that needs to be addressed. If it is, then you have to work on the three components of the limp; eventually working each one out.

Hang in there. Keep working on your therapy.
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replied October 6th, 2012
Hi I have a tibial plateau fracture/dislocation , I had surgery on 09/16/12 i have 2 plates and not sure how many screws . I was wondering if any one else was also numb on the bottom of their foot and had severe pain in the arch of their foot that comes and goes . I wouldn't need any pain med's if it was not for this pain also having muscle spasms and it feels as if someone is blowing cold air on my toes. Does any one know how long this will last and if it get's better? Or any tips on how to stop this feeling.
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replied October 6th, 2012
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afoss5,

If you have any type of cast, brace, dressing on your leg, you may need to have it adjusted. The symptoms you describe are usually due to irritation, compression, or injury of a nerve (numbness, severe pain, blowing air across the skin, etc).

The most common cause of this type of problem is something pressing on a nerve. It could be a too tight cast or brace. Dressings which are constricting will also do it.

If it is not an external appliance, then you have to look at the pattern of the sensory distribution to get an idea of which nerve is involved.

It is not too uncommon to injury a peripheral nerve when sustaining a signficant lower extremity fracture. The nerves are often closely associated with the bone, and when bones are fractures, the nerves can get stretched, pinched, or even cut (this is uncommon).

And, unfortunately, nerves can get injured during surgery, though usually this is mainly due to stretching or compression from swelling. These usally go away on their own. But, it can take some time.

So, you should probably contact your surgeon, especially if you have an external appliance on. But, if an adjustment of an appliance does not do the trick, your surgeon may have to investigate the situation further.

Good luck.
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Users who thank Gaelic for this post: afoss5 

replied October 26th, 2012
Compound Tib-Fib Fx with extreme foot pain 1 year post op
I had a compound tibfib fx in Oct 10-2011 from being hit by a motorbike in Indonesia. When I returned to US- Orthopedist put me in a full leg cast for 1 month- half cast for 1 mo and boot for 6 weeks. I have a plate and 8 screws that give me discomfort. However my biggest complaint is foot pain-across the top my foot is very sore and tender, in the arch and on either side of the heel.I am trying to be patient as it has only been a year ,but I want to be able to walk for exercise again and wear something besides athletic shoes.
Can anyone give me an idea of what this might be - how to treat it? Thank you
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replied October 19th, 2012
I had a broken Tib/fib July 28, surgery next day. No cast but hardware inside. I began riding stationary bike after 6 weeks and full wieght bearing after 9 weeks. Now walking without any aids. Some discomfort and swelling in the fracture area, otherwise driving and walking are no problem. If you can move any part othe ankle knee even the toes do it as it helps your recovery.
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replied November 10th, 2012
This week, one year after I had a distal tib/fib spiral fracture and had 2 plates and 13 screws put in, my bones have finally fused. Today, for the first time in a year I was able to walk 20 minutes to my university and 20 minutes back! It was a little painful and I still limp but I'm happy to have reached a point where I can do this. It has been a very long year, waiting for my bones to heal at a turtle-like pace and we even thought for a while that I would need more surgery to move the healing along. I was in a hard cast for 2 months after surgery and had pain every day because the cast was putting pressure on one of the screws. Once I was finally freed from that leg prison, I was in an air cast for 3 months. Then I graduated to only crutches for about a month, then 1 crutch for 2 months and I've been mostly free of crutches for 3 months, using a cane for walking if I need it (I didn't use it for my 40 min today! yay!)

I've done a little bit of physical therapy but because I'm a dirt poor student, I can't really afford to go more than once every 3-4 weeks. The muscles and some tendons are really tight still and some movements are especially difficult i.e. going down stairs, but I can see some improvement.

I have had to learn to be patient this year. It's been very challenging and painful, both physically and mentally. Depression was with me all through last winter, which is I believe a fairly common thing after a severe fracture.

I hope I continue improving even without much physical therapy.

The main reason I'm writing this post is because I remember reading through all these posts many months ago, while crying and hoping to see people with similar injuries telling me they had made it out and were living a full life once again. When I came home from my walk, I felt I should share with whoever is going through the pain right now. Your recovery may be quicker or longer than mine, but it will happen nonetheless. Surround yourself with people that make you laugh. I had the great privilege of having friends who would not let me mope around for too long and dragged me out of my room and made me laugh a lot. Focus on the little things. The first time I was able to climb a flight of stairs without crutches, I cried from happiness...it's really the little things.

I wish everyone a good recovery.
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replied April 8th, 2013
I'm 42. My injury took place the last week in January. Both bones broke in shards right at the top of the ski boot, but the bone was not exposed. For the first four weeks I wore a soft cast. I can't stand TV or Internet, both boring as Hell so the first few weeks were really difficult. Most important was to wean myself off of pain medications. I accomplished that in about three weeks.

I couldn't stand being at home any longer so I had my buddy take me to the gym and resumed my 4 day/week routine there, just keeping my leg elevated as much as possible. I could row without the leg but the stroke was off nearly half, max on the bench had dropped about 15kg. To reduce muscle loss in my affected leg, I was able to do a lunge exercise with the injured area resting on an elevated roller.

I went down to the river to fish nearly tripping in the mud, vines, roots, and rocks. Probably risky considering, but it was good to get out of the house.

At four weeks, the cast and sutures were removed, and I was given a immobilizing splint.

At eight weeks, bone growth was looking good, I was given a walking boot and asked to begin putting weight on the leg in 50 pound intervals about every 5 days, stationary bike at the gym.

Now I am at ten weeks. I am not using crutches at all. I've been fishing several times, and back up to the ski area several times to chat with the folks that helped me out in January. I feel like I can ski now, but know I shouldn't yet. It is a lot easier than I expected getting around on a mountain bike.

So far I have worked out most of the stiffness in my leg. There's still mild stiffness that I feel when I rotate my ankle. At the gym I am beginning to resume lightweight squats and other leg exercises.

I'm not sure what to expect long term. A few other guys at the ski area said that they have had similar procedures done years ago. For one guy he said that skiing wasn't a problem. Running was. He regrets not having the hardware removed because it seemed to cause him pain when running.
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replied May 4th, 2013
I have a bilateral tib fib fracture and I roding in both legs and the.doctor said only 6weeks non weight bearing I get crutches Wednesday is it because of my age?( 17}
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replied May 7th, 2013
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ajwilliams1995,

Weight bearing status is determined by several factors. But, the main one is the fracture pattern.

If the fracture is transverse (straight across), it is inherently stable and thus can be walked on immediately after surgery.

But, if the fracture pattern is oblique or spiral, weight bearing is usually delayed until there is some callus formation around the fracture. The oblique and spiral fracture patterns are considered unstable, so if weight is born too early, the fracture may displace.


So, you probably have a fracture pattern that requires the delay of weight bearing until there is some healing of the fracture.


But, weight bearing status is ultimately up to the surgoen. He/she knows how well the fracture has been fixed, how strong the bones are, and what the fracture pattern is.


Hopefully, by around six weeks, you will have some healing of the fracture and you can progress to some weight bearing activities.


Good luck.
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replied May 28th, 2013
Grateful to be alive
I hope someone out there can give me some hope. May 2008 I had a tib/fib compound fracture. It had to be completely cleaned out before it could be screwed and plated together and closed. I was in hospital for about two weeks and sewn up and released. I was back to the doc the next morning after a severly painful car ride because I still had the fever they released me with and my leg was turning black and oozing green. I will stop there.

The doctor saw me in his office at the hospital, unwrapped it, said looks good and gave me a slip to see him in 10 days. His nurse very non-sterilly put bandages on and sent me on my way. Thank goodness for my friend that said we are not going anywhere.

So into Wound Care Center in hospital we go. They were shocked to say the least as to what they saw. They got infectious disease to come in and admitted me immediately. I was there for a few days and not getting any better and no action by ortho doc. On my family's request was ambulanced to Shock Trauma.

The first thing I was asked to sign was paperwork for amputation. My leg was so infected and was getting into my blood stream. I had transfusions and immediate surgery to re-irragate and for an infectious disease doc there to put antibiotic beads in my leg. Glad I asked about Plan B. Needless to say they were not convinced that partial amputation and free flap would work but agreed to try. However if my life was in danger they would have to amputate.

After many, many surgeries and in Shock Trauma for about a month I was home with an Ex-Fix and in bed for 10 months. I was then in a wheel chair, then walked, crutches and cane. But during years 2 and 3 I was in and out of hospital to reduce my flap.

Last December 2012 I had surgery 28 to cut the bone and put metal in so that it would heal staighter as it was healing to the inside of my leg making it difficult to walk. Another stay in bed.

So here it is May 2013, 5 years later, and I am in pain every minute of every day. My opposite knee now needs to be replaced, I live on pain meds, anti-inflamatories, and other pills. But I still have my leg. Soon that metal will be removed.

I have neuropathy in both of my feet and hands which no one can explain but I am alive and still have my leg. I am so grateful to the docs at Shock Trauma where I still go every six weeks.

Have you ever had a patient that sustained this type of medical care originally? Any helpful suggestions for the neuropathy? Lyrica makes me crazy and Cymbalta does very little.

Good luck to everyone out there.
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replied June 8th, 2013
Resetting bones with external fixature structure
Sharon,I was sorry to hear your story but also found it helpful. My husband has gone through something a little similar. Broke his tib fib in Dec and rods/pins were put it. He struggled with swelling and it never looked quite right. Orthopedic surgeon said there was nothing out of the ordinary. Fast forward to March. My husband suddenly had flu like symptoms - somehow we quickly realized it was not right so we took him to ER - just in time as he went into shock and was in ICU for four days. We had the rod and pins removed and replaced with an external fixature. He has in the hospital three times over one month while they dealt with the infection, removing the rod/pins, cleaning dead tissue, and putting on the external fixature. He had a pick line and was on IV antibiotics for a long time - just recently shifted to oral antibiotics. He's being seen routingly by the orthopedic surgeon - he went in yesterday for routine visit to find out the bones are not alighed properly so they're going to have to operate next week to reposition the external fixture.

I share this as I'm curious if anyone has had a situation like this where the bones did not align and they have to operate to realign them?

Thanks!
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replied June 17th, 2013
Help, compound fracture Tibia and Fibula. Both shattered.
I broke my tibia and fibula on May 2/13. I shattered both bone, tibia is the worst. They had to remove a lot of bone from tibia`. Had a rod and four screws put in. It's been six weeks and last time I went their had been no bone growth what so ever. I am not going in for a bone graft which he said will take 6 months to a year to work. I was suppose to get married May 28, also was going to in 2011 but I was a police officer and involved in a bad accident. I need this to heal fast. I also use an electric Cig, which I saw is bad for healing but I'm so stress. My fiance is very depressed because of this.Prior to this I had neck surgery and right ankle surgery from work accident and was forced to retire. Does anyone know what the chances are for a bone graft to work? How bad does it hurt, my compound fracture was a few inches just above my ankle which I hear is the worst area to fracture. A close buddy of mine said his friend broke his leg years ago and Otho prescribe HGH as it promotes bone growth. I'm going to ask Ortho if he will prescribe it but he prob won't. Also I am 32 yrs old. Thanks for any advise you might have.
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replied June 21st, 2013
I would say sign a prenuptial agreement and get married. If she wont sign or either one of you wants to wait until you are healed, call it off -- because marriage is all about "in sickness or in health" if you don't have that now, you never will.

Plus, if you plan an event for your marriage, there's a whole lot of potential to be doing other things that take your mind off of the slow pace of recovery... and that's golden.

I wrote something here back in April about my skiing injury back in January and what happened since. Today at about five months, my bad leg doesn't hurt, my walking is normal, quads on bad leg are almost back to normal size, I can balance with full weight on my bad leg up to two minutes with my good leg moving front and back. Back in April, the doc said I should be able to jog by the end of June. Seems that he was about right. He also made my disabled parking card good through August. Already I'm back to normal which is parking at the far end of the parking lot to park faster and get more exercise.

Once my gait is improved, I will have the go ahead to start heavier leg exercises and rebuilding legs for the next ski season.

Calcium, protein, water, elevation, and physical therapy are key to an on-time and full recovery. I have figured that caffeine is an impediment so I use it sparingly.
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replied June 21st, 2013
Thanks for your reply, it' great to hear someone was healed so fast. Did you have a compound fracture of tibia and fibula? My Tibia a few inches above ankle is missing a large amount on the right side. Also my Fibula isn't even on top of each other. Do you have a bone graft done by chance? When did your doctor start seeing bone growth?
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replied July 16th, 2013
Shattered Tibia
I had a shattered tibia and fibia and had bone and skin graft. Happened in Jan in Germany. German doctors did all of the surgeries. Bone healing is very slow. Still in wheelchair. Back at work and feel great. Just no weight bearing. Germans thought I would be good in sept or oct. now closer to end of year. Bone healing on a graft is very slow. Ortho will now use an electronic gadget to make bone cells more active. Has been very frustrating. Do not smoke and I eat healthy. Any adivise from the gallery. Thanks
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replied July 25th, 2013
@Mike3505

your injury sounds very similar to mine... a compound tib/fib, 4 inches or so above ankle, small pieces of bone removed, and treated with an IM nail and four screws.

after 6 weeks my xray showed no signs of healing, tho the pain had decreased. like you, i was very worried.

after 10 weeks the X-ray showed healing and i was recovering at quite a fast rate.

according to my Physio, X-rays sometimes don't show the early signs of bone healing, but reduced pain is an indication that they are on their way.

about the E-cig... I smoked a bit through my injury and things went fine for me (aged 24), but they do say nicotine has a bad effect on bone healing, whether it be an E-cig, a patch or a cigarette. that said, i think some forms are more detrimental than others.

good luck!
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replied July 25th, 2013
@Mike3505

your injury sounds very similar to mine... a compound tib/fib, 4 inches or so above ankle, small pieces of bone removed, and treated with an IM nail and four screws.

after 6 weeks my xray showed no signs of healing, tho the pain had decreased. like you, i was very worried.

after 10 weeks the X-ray showed healing and i was recovering at quite a fast rate.

according to my Physio, X-rays sometimes don't show the early signs of bone healing, but reduced pain is an indication that they are on their way.

about the E-cig... I smoked a bit through my injury and things went fine for me (aged 24), but they do say nicotine has a bad effect on bone healing, whether it be an E-cig, a patch or a cigarette. that said, i think some forms are more detrimental than others.

good luck!
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