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Precautions after shoulder dislocation?

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I dislocated my shoulder during basketball. I'm 14. It is my first time, and it was only dislocated for 2 seconds or so. Then it popped back into place by its self. After it just felt sore, not so much of a really sharp pain. The pain was more like the soreness after a vaccine shot. I could move my arm fine in all range of motions, but again it is sore, so I wouldn't like to raise this arm, or move it too much. There is no swelling, and it pretty much looks the same as my other arm which was unhurt. Is this serious? What precautions should I take? How long should I keep from physical activities like basketball? Any other information should I know about this injury? This is my first major injury, and I heard some people get problems from dislocated shoulders years after the injury.
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First Helper User Profile Gaelic
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replied December 14th, 2009
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Hi Anonymous and welcome to ehealth...The wisest thing that you can do is to talk to your doctor or even better see your Orthopedist about this injury...They will probably X-ray to see if you did any muscle or rotator cuff damage, then give you their medical advice...Sometimes a sling is necessary depending upon the injury, but do check it out....Good luck and enjoy being 14....I remember it well.. sunny

Caroline
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replied December 14th, 2009
Make sure you take it easy, don't do any heavy lifting with your bad arm. Also, consider seeing a chiroprachter. They can do wonders for dislocated body parts.
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replied December 13th, 2011
shoulder dislocation
hello my name is vaibhav
i dislocated my right shoulder 2 times
first was when i slapped a guy automatically my shoulder came down and then was fixed up in 5 sec,yess the pain was hilarious then after some days again this thing happened when i was playing football.....the doctor fixed my problem but after 1 year again i got a jerk while playin football and again shoulder dislocation occured....
plzzzz tell me what i can do??
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replied December 13th, 2011
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Vaibhav,

You need to have the shoulder evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon. Then depending upon the type of instability pattern you have, your age, and your activity level, a treatment plan can be made.

Usually, if the shoulder is subluxing (coming part of the way out and relocating itself, without having to go to the emergency department), you may be able to fix this with a serious rehabilitation exercise program.

But, if the shoulder is truly dislocating (coming completely out of joint, requiring a physician to put it back in place), you are young, and you want to be physically activity, then surgical correction is usually recommended.


Since the shoulder has come out of joint three times now, and it sounds like you want to be physically active, playing football and such, you really need to see an orthopedic surgeon. You may need to have the shoulder fixed surgically.

Good luck.
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replied January 30th, 2012
Hi
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replied September 18th, 2012
what to avoid for a dislocated shoulder
Even I have a dislocated shoulder some two days ago.An arm band is tied to my hands. I just want to ask what things to avoid for any further shoulder dislocation Is deficiency of calcium has anything to do with it?
What supplements should I take to strengthen my shoulder?

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replied September 19th, 2012
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greatdixit,

Sorry about your injury.

In terms of motions to avoid after a shoulder dislocation depends upon the direction of the dislocation. Different structures are injured in the different ways a shoulder can go when it dislocates.

The most common direction is an anterior dislocation.

The structures damaged in an anterior dislocation are the anterior capsule, the anterior glenohumeral ligaments (especially the middle one), the tendon of the subscapularis muscle, and the anterior labrum (called a Bankhart lesion).

Thus, you want to avoid motions that stress these structures. The patient is usually immobilized with the humerus in internal rotation (position with the palm of the hand/forearm across the abdomen, as when placed in a sling or cuff-n-collar). So, you want to avoid external rotation of the upper arm and extension of the shoulder (reaching backwards).


As to the calcium, though calcium is needed for proper action of the muscle fibers, a calcium deficiency does not play into a shoulder dislocation, which is due to trauma.


As for supplements, basically all you need to do is consume a little extra protein and an otherwise well balanced diet. The extra protein is for the building blocks needed by the body to rebuild the soft tissue damage.

Once you have completed the period of immobilization recommended by your surgeon, you will need to do an extensive therapy program to regain range of motion and strength. It is very important to build up the strength of the muscles around the shoulder so that the joint does not redislocate.

Good luck.
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replied September 24th, 2012
Kindly elaborate the following point written on my report

"Focal cortical discontinuity is observed at greater tuberosity level.............. post injury."
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replied September 24th, 2012
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greatdixit,

I assume that this from a report of an MRI or CT scan.

"Focal cortical discontinuity is observed at greater tuberosity level.............. post injury."

This is basically saying that the cortex at the greater tuberosity is broken. The cortex of a bone (cortical bone) is the hard outer part of the bone. The inner part of a bone is called cancellous bone (spongy bone). The cancellous bone is where the bone marrow is located.

The greater tuberosity is a bump on the humeral head where three of the rotator cuff muscles attach (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor).


It is not uncommon for the greater tuberosity to be fractured in shoulder dislocations. It is basically pulled off by the muscles which attach to it. Thus, it is important after a shoulder dislocation has been reduced to review the x-rays to make sure that there are no other injuries, such as a greater tuberosity fracture. If there are, these have to be evaluated to make sure that they too have been reduced and are being treated properly.

Good luck.
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replied September 24th, 2012
Thanks, your comment was more than helpful to me.
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replied December 1st, 2012
hello! my name is Rishab Raj, I had a fight and my shoulder was dislocated and the doctor fixed it immediately then after 3 weeks of dislocation when i try to lift a 3kg of dumbbell i can feel that my shoulder is dislocating again...what to do now? how can i fix this problem?

Thanks!
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replied December 1st, 2012
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Rishab Raj,

Sorry about your accident.

You must first go through a thorough rehabilitation program, to rebuild the muscles around the shoulder. Because of the bony anatomy around the shoulder (a very shallow ball and socket joint), it relies greatly on the muscles to provide a significant portion of the stability of the joint.

After the shoulder has been fully rehabilitated, if the sensation of instability is still present, then a thorough evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon would be needed. If there is residual instability, despite full muscle strength, then a surgical stabilization may be necessary.

In some cases, if the patient has very significant instability, it may prevent him/her from being able to rehab. In these cases, the surgery would have to be done before the patient can rehab completely.


So, you should contact a physical therapist and get into a proper shoulder dislocation rehab program. If you are unable to rehab, the therapist should be able to refer you to the proper surgeon for evaluation.

Good luck.
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replied July 26th, 2013
shoulder bone displacement
Hi, I'm gokul
I ve shoulder dislocation problem since 3 years, it comes like 6 months once. As per orthopedic I need an operation to get it correct... But I'm afraid of operations so I'm getting some native treatment whr dey put some medicine n wrap around shoulder.

My question is whether it's useful or I should undergo operation only... Please reply
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