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Pain in upper back when moving head

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Hi all. I am new here. I searched for a back forum as I've been trying to get in to my doctors all week but have been unable to get an appointment. My pain still persists though. Wondering what on earth it is as have never had anything like this before, or that has been sore for so long. I am male, 30, otherwise good health, fit and take of myself.

My upper back was feeling a bit tight for a few days. Then the other morning I got up, and while getting dressed I felt an incredibly sharp pain like a knife going in, and it's been in agony ever since. I feel a really sharp pain in the center of my upper back, almost like it's connected to my spine somehow, not a normal muscular pain. It occurs whenever I move my head, particularly turning left or right, or also moving it up and down. The strange thing is I have full movement of my arms and shoulders. I can move them around freely with zero pain, I can bend over and touch my toes easily. It is only neck movement which causes extreme pain, but my neck itself is fine. I just feel the pain in the middle of my shoulder blades. Anyone experienced anything like this before or know what it might be? It's very persistent. Even when sitting still I feel a pain there.
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First Helper sharingan22
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replied May 24th, 2010
Active User, very eHealthy
sounds like it could be an alighnment problem like kyphosis or scoliois of either or both your neck or upper back
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replied May 24th, 2010
But I have no visible deformity, nor have I ever had any such problem or even slight pain in this area before. Such a sudden onset of severe pain wouldn't be attributable to these conditions would they, without previous symptoms?
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replied May 25th, 2010
Active User, very eHealthy
Yes its a good argument you make but you say you were a bit tight before the onset of symptoms plus trauma can cause alignment problems also sometimes these things are only seen on x ray there are many different ways the spine can curve abnormally.

I think it would be unusual for such a suden onset of symptoms to be attributed to a curveture problem without a traumatic event but not out of the question. however i agree after your second post that this type of disease sounds alot less likely post again after you have had x rays or some extra information.

Good luck fractals
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replied May 25th, 2010
Experienced User
As I know, here are 5 common (but usually overlooked) ways muscles get unhappy.
1. Sleeping with too many pillows which push your head forward or sideways.
2. Watching television or driving in a seat that tilts your back toward the seat, but forces your head to move forward. This position strains your neck muscles.
3. Wearing bifocals when working on the computer or a project. If they cause you to lift your chin and tilt your head back, the muscles at the back of your skull will get tight and complain. The muscles along the sides of your neck will probably also be unhappy and you might get a headache.
4. Having a weak back lets your head move too far forward and creates a rounded back. This overstretches your neck and upper back muscles (as well as causing other problems.) Your back muscles complain by giving you pain.
5. Hunching, or leaning, to one side when you are seated will also cause upper back pain. Your muscles are getting stretched on one side, but not the other. It's best to sit on both of your "sit bones."
If you pay attention to the times of day when your upper back or neck bothers you the most, you will begin to discover the cause of your back and neck pain.
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replied April 30th, 2013
Hi there your post just describedeverything I am feeling right now I feel likw I wrote the post myself! Lol please can you update me on how u are now and what was wrong? Ive been in agony everytime I move my head for around 3 weeks now if u could help me in anyway with advice?
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replied April 30th, 2013
Hi there your post just describedeverything I am feeling right now I feel likw I wrote the post myself! Lol please can you update me on how u are now and what was wrong? M
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replied May 29th, 2014
I am experiencing the same symptoms. I believe my pain is resulting from sleeping awkwardly. Perhaps my pillow is too high.

I'm going to continue to move my head left and right - for range of motion and I'll see my RMT tomorrow. Good luck to you all.
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replied June 26th, 2014
upper back pain caused by moving the neck downwards
I have a related/similar pain that is provoked when I move my neck towards the ground and my chin touches my chest. The pain is centred at the diaphragm and I can feel the pain so vividly it affects the top abdominals. I've had this pain for about 3 days and it hasn't improved, I've gone through a variety of stretches and pain relieving pills, though none have improved my condition. The pain increases when I wake up in the morning and roughly 1 hour after I wake up it returns to the normal amount of pain.
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replied November 2nd, 2014
You may have strained or pulled your rhomboid. I have similar issues, likely due to bad posture and years of weight training with a big focus on my pecs. The pecs pull your shoulders forward stretching the rhomboid. The rhomboid supposedly connect to the spine at C4 to C5, I had X-ray and doc said C4 to C5 mild degradation. Proper posture- stretch front chest not back. Acupuncture not chiropractor for this. Slow to heal but will get better if you are cautious. Btw. Not a doctor just a pain sufferer.
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