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osteoporosis and inversion table

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Does anyone here use an inversion table even tho they have osteoporosis? I am getting a hump and thought maybe stretching my spine might help me as long as I don't go overboard and invert too much. I am a female, 69 years of age.
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replied October 28th, 2008
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Unfortunately, humps in the back appear when the osetocysts (the cells that make up the bones) decay and collapse on one another. So, a hunched back is more the results of bones than anything else. However, I think that it could be good for your spine nonetheless to try inversion to create space between the vertebrae. Combined with some shoulder strengthening exercises, you can try to stretch the chronically tight muscles of your neck and shoulders with an inversion machine.

Do you have a physical therapist nearby whom you can consult?
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replied October 28th, 2008
osteoporosis and inversion table
Thank you for your reply. And yes, there are physical therapists in town. I'll check into this further.
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replied October 28th, 2008
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Super. I'd suggest that you consult a PT and perhaps even a Pilates or yoga instructor about spinal alignment. Please let us know how it goes!
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replied June 21st, 2010
Dear Rooted, With all due respect I have to disagree with you that a 'hunched back is more the result of bones than anything else.' A hunched back is usually the result of faulty posture and movement patterns. Ie., it's the mis-use of muscles that usually causes a hunched back, not the 'collapsing of bones'. Not that anyone intentionally mis-uses their muscles but some of us fall into unhealthy postural habits (and body-use habits), especially as we sit for long hours at our desks or computers.
Look into Feldenkrais movement exercises as a way to improve your posture and movement. You can find some interesting Feldenkrais movement exercises on Youtube.com. There's also an excellent book by Mary Bond called "The New Rules of Posture." I highly recommend it. No one needs to have a hunched back as they age--we can all be as upright as actor Morgan Freeman if we're willing to change our habits.
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