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1. Mild left Knee joint effusion
2. Grade II meniscal signal (meniscal degeneration / intrasubstance tear) in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus.
3. Marked thinning with laxity of the anterior cruciate ligament suggesting tear.

Please advice for the above MRI reports. What can I do?
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replied June 13th, 2009
Supporter
I googled (meniscal degeneration / intrasubstance tear
and below is what I found-just one of several informations popped up..sounds like you are needing surgery.What did your doc say..

see below

Research article summary (published 30 May 2008):

Clinical significance of intrasubstance meniscal lesions on MRI.

Full Abstract
Grade 2 meniscal changes on MRI are linear signals confined within the meniscus thought to represent areas of meniscal degeneration or intrasubstance tears. It has been reported that in only 10% of cases is a meniscal tear detected during subsequent arthroscopy. Usually non-operative management is appropriate, but in some cases, grade 2 meniscal changes are seen on MRI in patients with a typical presentation of a meniscal tear. In this circumstance, an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy may be indicated and an MRI report, which describes the meniscus as being normal, may be confusing. A pilot study of 10 consecutive symptomatic patients (mean age 28.1 years) with a grade 2 meniscal signal on MRI was performed. At arthroscopy, with thorough examination of the meniscus using a probe, an intrasubstance tear was detected in all 10 patients. Partial meniscectomy was performed, with a mean follow-up of 6.7 months. All but one patient (due to other pathology) had marked improvement in pain and function. Thus, the authors believe that grade 2 signal changes should be reported in a manner that raises the possibility that they may cause symptoms and that the presence of any intrasubstance changes should be clearly conveyed in the report.




Research article summary (published 30 May 2008):

Clinical significance of intrasubstance meniscal lesions on MRI.

Full Abstract
Grade 2 meniscal changes on MRI are linear signals confined within the meniscus thought to represent areas of meniscal degeneration or intrasubstance tears. It has been reported that in only 10% of cases is a meniscal tear detected during subsequent arthroscopy. Usually non-operative management is appropriate, but in some cases, grade 2 meniscal changes are seen on MRI in patients with a typical presentation of a meniscal tear. In this circumstance, an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy may be indicated and an MRI report, which describes the meniscus as being normal, may be confusing. A pilot study of 10 consecutive symptomatic patients (mean age 28.1 years) with a grade 2 meniscal signal on MRI was performed. At arthroscopy, with thorough examination of the meniscus using a probe, an intrasubstance tear was detected in all 10 patients. Partial meniscectomy was performed, with a mean follow-up of 6.7 months. All but one patient (due to other pathology) had marked improvement in pain and function. Thus, the authors believe that grade 2 signal changes should be reported in a manner that raises the possibility that they may cause symptoms and that the presence of any intrasubstance changes should be clearly conveyed in the report.
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replied June 14th, 2009
Thank you for your replayed,

My doctor told me, if you will take care about on exercise then you don't need to arthroscope.

For your Information, I have 8 years old injury. My issue is that I am not able to run 1 KM continue or not much walk. One more think doctor found wasting.

Please let me know I need to follow my doctor advice or need to be arthroscope.
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replied July 4th, 2009
Mayur,
I was recently diagnosed with a similiar case. Even thought I do not fully know what it means, but this is what a recent MRI report stated about my right knee: Intrasubstance Degeneration Posterior Horn Medial Meniscus. No Evidence of Meniscal Tear.
The reason why I bring this up, was because my doctor was going to get me a Cortizone shot directly into the spot, so maybe your doctor will advise the same treatment.
Good Luck to you, and if you ever want to talk, drop me a message, ok?
Chris
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