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13 months old kid - bulged fontanelle

My 13 months old son has a bump on his fontanelle part from past 6 months. it neither increasenor decreased ..here is the ultrasound scan report------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------ ----------------------------------

Scalp Swelling ultrasonography... Well defined oviod cystic aseptate possibly clear fluid containing cystic space occupyinglesion seen over the region of the anterior fontanelle. the lesion measures 1.4 z 1.3 x 0.4 cms. the cyst is abutting on the bony plates of the calvarium on either sides. the superior sagittal sinusis immediatly subjacent to the cyst with possibly the dura seperating the lesion from sinus. impressipon : cyst in the body plane of the calvarium?bone cyst?? periosteal cyst.
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please let me know what does this indicate? I need help.please...
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replied January 30th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
savs,

Bone cysts are benign expansions of the cortical bone (the hard part of the bone). These are often filled with serum (also called plasma), which is the fluid part of the blood.

A periosteal cyst is a cyst that is adjacent (next to) to the cortical bone, within the periosteum of the bone. The periosteum is a thick covering over the bone, which contains blood vessels and nerves.


The fact that the mass has not changed in size and is not painful are very good. This usually means the mass is benign.


Ultrasounds do not give a clear enough picture to say much more about the mass. It is noted that the cyst is single, it is not divided up by septae (or dividers). This again leans towards a simple cyst.


So, the study will need to be correlated with the patient's history, symptoms, and physical exam. It may be necessary to get additional studies, like a CT scan or MRI, to see if the brain tissue is actually involved or not. Right now, it seems that the cyst is outside of the dura, or the lining of the brain.

You need to discuss the findings with your son's physician. Good luck.
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replied January 31st, 2012
Thanks Gaelic,
Thank you for the detailed explanation.
Currently I am staying in Atlanta,GA and I am new to this place. It would be a great help if anybody let me know the best pediatric surgeon in n around Atlanta,GA.
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replied February 1st, 2012
Especially eHealthy
savs,

I cannot advocate one practice over another, but you might look into the pediatric neurosurgery service at Emory University. This is from their website:


Pediatric Neurosurgery at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

In 2009, the Children’s Neurosciences program at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta had the highest neurosurgery and inpatient neurology volumes in the nation. Our neurosurgeons and pediatric plastic surgeons partner on more than 100 cases each year, providing a unique multi-specialty surgical collaboration offered by few pediatric hospitals in the Southeast. Additionally, Children's had the lowest neurosurgical shunt revision rate in a 2008 study involving 32 hospitals in the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database.*

Our pediatric neurosurgeons direct the neurosurgery service, where children with acute neurological surgical problems, such as epilepsy and brain tumor, can receive treatment.

The neurosurgical operating suite is equipped with specialized equipment for pediatric neurosurgery: dual stereoscopic microscopic, CO2 laser, YAG laser, neuro-endoscopy, intra-operative image guidance system for frameless stereotactic surgery, intra-operative MRI (iMRI), microsurgery equipment, ultrasonography and ultrasonic tissue aspirator.

Neurosurgical services include:
* Comprehensive diagnostic services including angiography, CT scanner, CT stereotactic surgery, MRI, iMRI, SPECT and PET scanning
*Seizure surgery including hemispherectomy for control of seizure activity
* Complex reconstruction for congenital craniofacial problems or trauma, brachial plexus injuries, as well as craniosynostosis surgery
* Selective dorsal rhizotomy and continuous intrathecal infusion for spasticity
* Stereotaxic radiosurgery using linear accelerator and the Gamma knife for brain tumor and arterio-venous malformation (AVM)
* Interventional neuroradiology for AVM
* Intracranial pressure monitoring and continuous cerebral oximetry for head injuries

Neurosurgery Physician Team:

William Boydston, MD, PhD
Practice Director, Neurological Surgery
Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Pediatric Neurosurgery Associates at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
Specialties: Pediatric neurosurgery: spasticity surgery, baclofen pumps, brachial plexus surgery, brain tumors, congenital anomalies of the brain and spine, hydrocephalus-congenital and post-hemorrhagic, intraventricular hemorrhage, perinatal consultations

Barun Brahma, MD
Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Pediatric Neurosurgery Associates at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
Specialties: Pediatric neurosurgery: spine, minimally-invasive spine surgery, brain tumors, chiari malformations

Andrew Reisner, MD
Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Pediatric Neurosurgery Associates at Children's at Healthcare of Atlanta
Medical Director, Neuro Trauma
Specialties: Pediatric neurosurgery: gamma knife radiosurgery, pituitary disorders/pituitary tumors, brain tumors, congenital anomalies of the brain and spine, hydrocephalus-congenital and post-hemorrhagic, intraventricular hemorrhage, perinatal consultation, traumatic brain injury

David M. Wrubel, MD
Assistant Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery
Medical Director, Neuro Spine Care for Kids
Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Pediatric Neurosurgery Associates at Children's at Healthcare of Atlanta
Specialties: Pediatric neurosurgery: brain tumors, status epilepticus, cutis aplasia/congenital scars (ACC), pilocytic astrocytoma/cystic cerebellar astrocytoma

Learn more about Pediatric Neurosurgery at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

*Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS), 2009; the PHIS hospitals are 42 of the largest and most advanced children’s hospitals in America and constitute the most demanding standards of pediatric service in America.



Hope you son does well. Good luck.
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