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medical ID tag ?

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I've had severe asthma and allergies since kindergarten. I am allergic to fire ant stings, prednisone, and mainly just outdoor things. With no food or really serious medication allergies, is a medical ID tag something I need to consider?
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replied April 28th, 2008
Community Volunteer
Prednisone is something that is prescribed a lot for various things so you might want it for that, but for the other reasons, I don't think that any of these things are serious enough to warrant a tag.
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replied April 28th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
It might be a good idea to write all your allergies and any medications you take on a piece of paper and carry it in your wallet.
I did this on index cards for each member of my family (we have different allergies) this makes it easier when we are at a new doctor or a the ER.
I included allergies, current medication, history of operations,primary doctor with phone number, emergency contact and blood type.

I heard some EMT's can look in a person's wallet for such information. In an emergency I hope they'd look in mine.
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replied April 29th, 2008
Okay, thank you both so much for your answers!! The wallet idea is very good, except I'm only 15 and don't carry a wallet with me a lot Smile ...I'll definetly tell my mom about that idea though! Very Happy I don't think I'll get a medical ID tag, since I don't really need it!

Thanks again!

~Secret Rose
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replied August 12th, 2009
^Serenity^ wrote:
It might be a good idea to write all your allergies and any medications you take on a piece of paper and carry it in your wallet.
I did this on index cards for each member of my family (we have different allergies) this makes it easier when we are at a new doctor or a the ER.
I included allergies, current medication, history of operations,primary doctor with phone number, emergency contact and blood type.

I heard some EMT's can look in a person's wallet for such information. In an emergency I hope they'd look in mine.


While that's a good idea, especially for people who have allergies to Meds, have medical problems and take alot of meds for those conditions, like me, there's a downside to not wearing a bracelet or necklace. Many times in an energency, the EMTs don't have time to check your wallet before taking some kind of action. At least if they see some kind of medical tag, It throws up a red flag for them. Even if you have alot of medical conditions, have many allergies and take alot of meds and it's too much to fit it all on a tag, at least it has your name, ss# and can list your doctor, so that they can check w/the appropiate people on said conditions.
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replied August 20th, 2009
i have one with a chip in it and then all the EMT has to do is scan it.... it is more expensive then the other ones but i have tons of allergys, doctors medications and a very long health history i would need like tons of index cards
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replied July 14th, 2010
I have asthma and anaphylaxis, for me id bracelets are the way to go. In an emergency, no matter where i am my friends can inform the ambulance services of my allergies simply by reading my barcelet, they can ring my parents straight away because the number is there for them to read and of course the ambulance crew can act quickly and appropriately.
A piece of paper in my wallet is no use to anyone, it would take them an hour to find it as it takes me an hour to rummage through all the rubbish i have stuffed into it! lol
: )
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replied April 22nd, 2011
I now own a very pretty id bracelet that says Asthma carries inhaler. You can choose what words you want engraving.
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replied October 27th, 2011
Medical Id that I like
A discrete medical id bracelet that I wear is from idonme.
I like it. The great thing about it, you can change the info inside if you need to.
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replied September 12th, 2011
Medical ID for Asthma
Having a Medical ID for Asthma is actually a good idea. As an EMT responding to an emergency, it would alert me to the fact that you already have a high risk airway. Emergencies are not planned, such as after an accident, severe asthma attack, respiratory distress from smoke inhalation, a reaction to pollen or dust, etc. Wallet cards, though useful, are much more limited is it on you (swimming, gym, etc.) and the increased liability. Increasingly, the EMTs want the police to go through the wallet so there is a lower chance of claims and accusations later. In any emergency were you might not be able to communicate, it provides critical helpful informaiton.

PS: I wear one for both an allergy and prior injury (both are on one tag).
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