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Life expectancy for bp ?

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What is the life expectancy of a person with bipolar? My fiance has BP, but when in the mood swings is never excessive. He just tends to get angry quickly at the little things. I am patient, and tell him how I am always there for him.

Whats the life expectancy???

xx
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First Helper revamped83
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replied May 11th, 2009
?
look girl get over yourself lt him live life ok geez!!!
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replied May 11th, 2009
look, when you learn to spell come back. I only want to know the rough life expectancy of someone with BP, if its any different to people without BP...No need to be stroppy
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replied May 11th, 2009
Hi there.

I used to disagree with the statistics.

Here is one I just came across...

"Studies have shown that 25 to 50 percent of people with bipolar disorder (manic depression) attempt suicide. "

I used to disagree with that...thinking the statistics were skewed somehow...and then I tried to kill myself last November.

So there ya go.
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replied October 17th, 2012
I'm in that boat. I want to find the actual studies and I want to know if it's our lifestyle choices, the medications effecting our overall long term health or if it's largely b/c most of those with the most severe illness are just going to kill ourselves before we have a chance to reach old age.
I have never seen myself living long. I'm not worried at all about the abnormally high and ultimately devastating cancer in my family nor am i worried about the the shocking amount of alzheimer's in another branch of our tree because I know I won't last long enough for those to take me. I am trying very hard to work towards the amazing dreams and goals I have set for myself but it almost seems to late anymore b/c I don't really think I'll be around long enough for them to happen. THat's awfully morbid. But living with what I have, what you have...i'm actually stunned to find that stat so low.
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replied May 12th, 2009
Extremely eHealthy
I think it largely would depend on getting the proper treatment and sticking with it (which can be very difficult). It also depends on how severe the case is.

If you have questions about bipolar disorder, why not ask your fiance if you can speak with his psychiatrist about it? Write down a list of questions and take them to the meeting. Your fiance can be there or not, depending on what you two and his doctor decides. If your fiance isn't there, however, his doctor won't be able to give you specifics about your fiance's case (without his permission), but you can ask general and hypothetical questions.

Also, you may want to look into a support group for people with family members and friends with BP. They will understand the ups and downs. It may keep you from being overwhelmed. It is really great that your fiance found a patient person who loves him.
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replied May 12th, 2009
My daughter is bi-polar and now in her thirties. I agree that suicide can change the average age but that can be factored for anyone with any type of unpleasant diagnosis from parkinson's to cancer. when we lose hope we choose darkness. If treated and willing to rely on their support system to keep them afloat, people with bi-polar can function fairly normally. It is us support people who have to watch for the triggers and unexpected changes. But as long as we react with the love and support that you are showing they can get through those moments until they are rebalanced with their medications and generally maintain a fairly normal life.
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replied October 15th, 2009
It's a crap shoot,it all depends on if someone with bipolar disorder like me takes their medication and doesn't commit suicide as I have given a try at several times. The other factors are in the medications,some of them create their own health problems including excessive weight gain,chemical imbalance control which effect the bodily chemical balance. I wonder why you ask this question,is it the need to either support him or leave him to find someone with a longer life expectancy.Either way if I were you I would do some soul searching and do what is in your own best interest,don't stay because of guilt.
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replied October 19th, 2009
The average female with bipolar disorder with an onset at age 25 will lose, on average, 9 years in life expectancy, 14 years of lost productivity and 12 years of normal health compared with normal controls (US DHEW, 1979). This is in addition to the risk of suicide
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replied July 7th, 2011
BP Life-expectancy ~ 9 years Reduction Causal-factors
DALYS, and adjusting for morbidity to measures quality-of-life, QOL, accounts for productivity and normal health.

Data analysis for 25 year old female's nine year life reduction will enhance our understanding.

What cohorts were selected ?

Random Sample size N/Control = 25 year old female BPs, no family history of disease, diverse backgrounds, SES, *treatment adherent.*

What are the implications for the nine year reductions, and have causal relations been established? BPs may have co-morbidities: substance-abuse, engage more in at-risk behaviors and may be prone to accidents, impacting LYs. Within the data-set, any regression amd variance with race and SES ?

Has a direct link been proven between the BP disease, itself, ( for example, the number of psychotic episodes), and that of reduced longevity ?
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replied July 7th, 2011
Experienced User
I think that is pretty much a given even without doing the research. During manic episodes, people with the disorder are more likely to engage in risky order which might range from unprotected sex with strangers (on the mild side) to full blown delusions (such godlike powers as the ability to fly).

During depressive stages, people with bipolar disorder are more likely to attempt suicide and neglect their health.

I do not know if the correlation has ever been established, but one can confidently predict that more manic and depressive episodes (and the longer they last) the shorter life expectancy they are correlated with.
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replied July 8th, 2011
I believe there are no conclusive studies that can predict ones life expectancy. It's in the manner in which they live. If your an alcoholic you'll probably dies of medical complications. If you step into on coming traffic; well you get the idea. I believe a person with BP can have a long life given they do not place themselves at risk. I would suggest you not worry yourself about anyones life expectancy and enjoy the time you have on this planet with family and loved ones.
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replied February 8th, 2012
A person with Bipolar Condition will live longer that any body if he does take his medication everyday and eat properly, besides he or she can live without working since is declared disable to work.
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replied February 9th, 2012
What's going to get me is not my bipolarism but my smoking.Our suicide rate is high but once you take that out of the equation, we will die from other causes like cancer, diabetes or heart disease. We don't die from bipolarism.
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replied April 29th, 2012
Bi-Polar Life Expectancy
There is a major issue that noone has mentioned or even considered. As we age we tend to require DAILY prescriptions to maintain a healthy BODY and to extend our lives. Caregivers of the ELDERLY WITHOUT mental illness often struggle with seniors who refuse to or are confused about the timing, dates of taking DAILY prescriptions.

Taking RXs for diabetes, hypertension, etc., not only require DAILY dosages but SPECIFIC TIMES of the day, as well as some RXs taken 2, 3 times per day. Some RXs, taken 1 time per week, etc. Often times JUST GETTING a ELDERLY person to COOPERATE requires FAMILARITY and TRUST on behalf of the patient. Again, DAILY medications for PHYSICAL disorders in patients WITHOUT mental illness!!

Patients with diabetes and or heart disorders, high cholesterol, osteoperosis, etc., also require RESTRICTED FOOD programs. These food restrictions can and often become ANOTHER source of non-compliance and heated disputes between the patient ( without mental illness ) and caregiver.

Day in and day out SKIPPING or REFUSING to take scheduled RXs AND refusing to stay on the restricted food program, often requires frequent hospital ER visits and or early death.

Sadly, physicians say that mental patients have an extremely low rate of compliance, when it comes to prescription drug treatment.

Because, most patients with mental illness spend the majority of their lives, believing that they do NOT NEED ANY MEDICATION whatsoever for what they believe is a MISDIAGNOSIS in the first place. In spite of a lifetime of disastrous heartbreaking personal events of chronic unemployment, broken relationships, hospitalizations and agonizing depressive episodes. MOST of them NEVER accept their diagnosis, and therefore refuse medication on a daily basis IN THEIR YOUNGER YEARS of life. As we age we tend to become a more stubborn version of younger selves.

So, if someone, anyone refuses to take required medication on a daily basis, you can see what can happen if they develop A PHYSICAL ILLNESS that requires DAIILY dosages. Many mental patients often DISAPPEAR for days, weeks, months and often years at a time. Often times the family is worried to death, but is powerless to find the patient or force them to stay at home. Most mentally ill patients rarely stay married and often wind up living with their elderly parents, until their parents pass away. My grandmother had a massive heart attack and died caring for my aunt who is severely bi-polar.

Legally, noone cannot be forced to take any kind of medication, unless they are in an institution. Additionally, noone can FORCE someone to stay indoors. A court appointed guardian has LIMITED authority over a person in their care.

Just what do you think is happening the HEART organ of a bi-polar patient, and years of uncontrolled episodes nervous raging meltdowns? If the patient has other illnesses, they will deteriorate the body much faster in the mentally ill. An adult person with mental illness is legally an adult, who has A MIND of THEIR own. This MIND is running the program AND STOPPING the program without warning.

The CONCEPT if DAILY medications, either for mental or psychical illess is totally contradictory for the RANDOM nature of bi-polar disorders and the incurability of the denial virus.

Sadly, for all of the above reasons, it is not difficult to see WHY/HOW the life expectancy in mentally ill patients is shorter than others.

Kitcat_007
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replied April 29th, 2012
Bi-Polar Life Expectancy
There is a major issue that noone has mentioned or even considered. As we age we tend to require DAILY prescriptions to maintain a healthy BODY and to extend our lives. Caregivers of the ELDERLY WITHOUT mental illness often struggle with seniors who refuse to or are confused about the timing, dates of taking DAILY prescriptions.

Taking RXs for diabetes, hypertension, etc., not only require DAILY dosages but SPECIFIC TIMES of the day, as well as some RXs taken 2, 3 times per day. Some RXs, taken 1 time per week, etc. Often times JUST GETTING a ELDERLY person to COOPERATE requires FAMILARITY and TRUST on behalf of the patient. Again, DAILY medications for PHYSICAL disorders in patients WITHOUT mental illness!!

Patients with diabetes and or heart disorders, high cholesterol, osteoperosis, etc., also require RESTRICTED FOOD programs. These food restrictions can and often become ANOTHER source of non-compliance and heated disputes between the patient ( without mental illness ) and caregiver.

Day in and day out SKIPPING or REFUSING to take scheduled RXs AND refusing to stay on the restricted food program, often requires frequent hospital ER visits and or early death.

Sadly, physicians say that mental patients have an extremely low rate of compliance, when it comes to prescription drug treatment.

Because, most patients with mental illness spend the majority of their lives, believing that they do NOT NEED ANY MEDICATION whatsoever for what they believe is a MISDIAGNOSIS in the first place. In spite of a lifetime of disastrous heartbreaking personal events of chronic unemployment, broken relationships, hospitalizations and agonizing depressive episodes. MOST of them NEVER accept their diagnosis, and therefore refuse medication on a daily basis IN THEIR YOUNGER YEARS of life. As we age we tend to become a more stubborn version of younger selves.

So, if someone, anyone refuses to take required medication on a daily basis, you can see what can happen if they develop A PHYSICAL ILLNESS that requires DAIILY dosages. Many mental patients often DISAPPEAR for days, weeks, months and often years at a time. Often times the family is worried to death, but is powerless to find the patient or force them to stay at home. Most mentally ill patients rarely stay married and often wind up living with their elderly parents, until their parents pass away. My grandmother had a massive heart attack and died caring for my aunt who is severely bi-polar.

Legally, noone cannot be forced to take any kind of medication, unless they are in an institution. Additionally, noone can FORCE someone to stay indoors. A court appointed guardian has LIMITED authority over a person in their care.

Just what do you think is happening the HEART organ of a bi-polar patient, and years of uncontrolled episodes nervous raging meltdowns? If the patient has other illnesses, they will deteriorate the body much faster in the mentally ill. An adult person with mental illness is legally an adult, who has A MIND of THEIR own. This MIND is running the program AND STOPPING the program without warning.

The CONCEPT if DAILY medications, either for mental or psychical illess is totally contradictory for the RANDOM nature of bi-polar disorders and the incurability of the denial virus.

Sadly, for all of the above reasons, it is not difficult to see WHY/HOW the life expectancy in mentally ill patients is shorter than others.

Kitcat_007
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied April 29th, 2012
There is a major issue that noone has mentioned or even considered. As we age we tend to require DAILY prescriptions to maintain a healthy BODY and to extend our lives. Caregivers of the ELDERLY WITHOUT mental illness often struggle with seniors who refuse to or are confused about the timing, dates of taking DAILY prescriptions.

Taking RXs for diabetes, hypertension, etc., not only require DAILY dosages but SPECIFIC TIMES of the day, as well as some RXs taken 2, 3 times per day. Some RXs, taken 1 time per week, etc. Often times JUST GETTING a ELDERLY person to COOPERATE requires FAMILARITY and TRUST on behalf of the patient. Again, DAILY medications for PHYSICAL disorders in patients WITHOUT mental illness!!

Patients with diabetes and or heart disorders, high cholesterol, osteoperosis, etc., also require RESTRICTED FOOD programs. These food restrictions can and often become ANOTHER source of non-compliance and heated disputes between the patient ( without mental illness ) and caregiver.

Day in and day out SKIPPING or REFUSING to take scheduled RXs AND refusing to stay on the restricted food program, often requires frequent hospital ER visits and or early death.

Sadly, physicians say that mental patients have an extremely low rate of compliance, when it comes to prescription drug treatment.

Because, most patients with mental illness spend the majority of their lives, believing that they do NOT NEED ANY MEDICATION whatsoever for what they believe is a MISDIAGNOSIS in the first place. In spite of a lifetime of disastrous heartbreaking personal events of chronic unemployment, broken relationships, hospitalizations and agonizing depressive episodes. MOST of them NEVER accept their diagnosis, and therefore refuse medication on a daily basis IN THEIR YOUNGER YEARS of life. As we age we tend to become a more stubborn version of younger selves.

So, if someone, anyone refuses to take required medication on a daily basis, you can see what can happen if they develop A PHYSICAL ILLNESS that requires DAIILY dosages. Many mental patients often DISAPPEAR for days, weeks, months and often years at a time. Often times the family is worried to death, but is powerless to find the patient or force them to stay at home. Most mentally ill patients rarely stay married and often wind up living with their elderly parents, until their parents pass away. My grandmother had a massive heart attack and died caring for my aunt who is severely bi-polar.

Legally, noone cannot be forced to take any kind of medication, unless they are in an institution. Additionally, noone can FORCE someone to stay indoors. A court appointed guardian has LIMITED authority over a person in their care.

Just what do you think is happening the HEART organ of a bi-polar patient, and years of uncontrolled episodes nervous raging meltdowns? If the patient has other illnesses, they will deteriorate the body much faster in the mentally ill. An adult person with mental illness is legally an adult, who has A MIND of THEIR own. This MIND is running the program AND STOPPING the program without warning.

The CONCEPT if DAILY medications, either for mental or psychical illess is totally contradictory for the RANDOM nature of bi-polar disorders and the incurability of the denial virus.

Sadly, for all of the above reasons, it is not difficult to see WHY/HOW the life expectancy in mentally ill patients is shorter than others.

Kitcat_007
|
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replied July 15th, 2012
bipolar life expectancy
bi-polar is such a deep depression that suicide is far from the only risk, at that depth of sadness, you can barely think clearly, all seemingly rational decisions are suspect
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replied February 12th, 2013
Unfortunately prevalence of addictive behaviours and risky lifestyle choices is much greater among those with bipolar disorder. Studies have shown that 50% of people with bipolar struggle with some kind of addiction, usually a combination of tobacco with alcohol or substance abuse.

Look at it this way. Most "normal" people achieve in life with one goal in mind - the pursuit of happiness. They work hard so they can own that nice car, which generally brings a feeling of happiness at least for a little while. Being awarded a position at work, or being given the respect of your peers ... that brings happiness. Bringing a child into your life for most people brings feelings of joy.

People with bipolar experience no such thing. They are incredibly lucky if their mood EVER represents their standing in life, or what's going on around them. They can be feeling miserable and suicidal when they've just fathered their first child, or been given a promotion at work, or at the best holiday they've experienced. Some may even feel elated or manic when a close friend has passed away.

This is where addiction comes into the picture. An untreated bipolar patient feels there is no constancy or stability in their moods, so they reach desperately for anything to self medicate the ups and downs. They then realise that when they take X drug, or drink, they feel Y. ie bipolar patient + alcohol & / or drugs = feeling high. It's the only constant equation in an otherwise chaotic moody whirlwind of untreated bipolar. Taking drugs or drinking alcohol or smoking cigarettes affords the only sense of control over their feelings.

Most people assume that treatment will resolve this problem. However, treatment for bipolar is far from an exact science. Mood stabilising medications can reduce the severity of the cycling, but the patient's mood is STILL cycling underneath - their mood still doesn't represent the state of their life, or what's going on around them. They're very lucky if their emotional compass bears any semblance to the reality of their life. If they manage to take enough medication to eradicate the cycling completely, they may very well find other areas of their cognition take a hit as well. Lithium toxicity offers an interesting insight into the state of bipolar treatment. The main symptom of toxicity is "confusion / stupor". People prescribed lithium are taking barely sub-toxic doses, but it is this same effect of "confusion / stupor" that affords lithium's mood-stabilising / therapeutic effect. The patient's cognition is fogged out such that they take less notice of their moods. That is what mood-stabilisers are. Psychiatry is still in the dark ages with bipolar, and arguably mental illness as a whole.

There's a reason bipolar is the biggest burden on welfare out of all mental illnesses affords an interesting insight into human nature, and the importance of the individual pursuit of happiness on maintaining a progressive and functional society. It seems once the internal emotional compass is thrown off its axis, there becomes little point in achieving anything, or directing one's energy in any positive direction. A treated bipolar patient may only manage to calm the storm enough to point themselves to where society expects they should be going.
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Users who thank revamped83 for this post: fallsailor 

replied February 28th, 2013
revamped83 wrote:
Unfortunately prevalence of addictive behaviours and risky lifestyle choices is much greater among those with bipolar disorder. Studies have shown that 50% of people with bipolar struggle with some kind of addiction, usually a combination of tobacco with alcohol or substance abuse.

Look at it this way. Most "normal" people achieve in life with one goal in mind - the pursuit of happiness. They work hard so they can own that nice car, which generally brings a feeling of happiness at least for a little while. Being awarded a position at work, or being given the respect of your peers ... that brings happiness. Bringing a child into your life for most people brings feelings of joy.

People with bipolar experience no such thing. They are incredibly lucky if their mood EVER represents their standing in life, or what's going on around them. They can be feeling miserable and suicidal when they've just fathered their first child, or been given a promotion at work, or at the best holiday they've experienced. Some may even feel elated or manic when a close friend has passed away.

This is where addiction comes into the picture. An untreated bipolar patient feels there is no constancy or stability in their moods, so they reach desperately for anything to self medicate the ups and downs. They then realise that when they take X drug, or drink, they feel Y. ie bipolar patient + alcohol & / or drugs = feeling high. It's the only constant equation in an otherwise chaotic moody whirlwind of untreated bipolar. Taking drugs or drinking alcohol or smoking cigarettes affords the only sense of control over their feelings.

Most people assume that treatment will resolve this problem. However, treatment for bipolar is far from an exact science. Mood stabilising medications can reduce the severity of the cycling, but the patient's mood is STILL cycling underneath - their mood still doesn't represent the state of their life, or what's going on around them. They're very lucky if their emotional compass bears any semblance to the reality of their life. If they manage to take enough medication to eradicate the cycling completely, they may very well find other areas of their cognition take a hit as well. Lithium toxicity offers an interesting insight into the state of bipolar treatment. The main symptom of toxicity is "confusion / stupor". People prescribed lithium are taking barely sub-toxic doses, but it is this same effect of "confusion / stupor" that affords lithium's mood-stabilising / therapeutic effect. The patient's cognition is fogged out such that they take less notice of their moods. That is what mood-stabilisers are. Psychiatry is still in the dark ages with bipolar, and arguably mental illness as a whole.

There's a reason bipolar is the biggest burden on welfare out of all mental illnesses affords an interesting insight into human nature, and the importance of the individual pursuit of happiness on maintaining a progressive and functional society. It seems once the internal emotional compass is thrown off its axis, there becomes little point in achieving anything, or directing one's energy in any positive direction. A treated bipolar patient may only manage to calm the storm enough to point themselves to where society expects they should be going.


revamped 83,

Thank you for your post...!

I was involved with a BP GF and we broke up in Dec. This site and posts like yours have really helped me to understand what she was going through and things happened as they did.

I have a post on my experience with her in the "Low sex drive" thread and I came back on here today because I am having dinner with her tomorrow night. We are not getting back together, although, I still love her.

Thank you!

FS

PS/ Being a life insurance guy I feel that I need to add something to the discussion of Life Expediency. LE is when out of a group of people... half of them will be dead... the other half will still be alive. My concern in my situation was always the long term side affects of all of the meds she is on...
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