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Is Asperger's Hereditary ? (Page 1)

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I did a pregnancy test, and it came up positive. I've done 3 more tests since then, and they are all coming up positive.

My question is, does anyone know if Asperger's Syndrome is hereditary, and what are the chances of the baby being born with it, as the father has Asperger's.
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First Helper dmc9cm
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replied April 15th, 2009
Extremely eHealthy
it is known to be hereditary but you wont know until your child is pre school age anyway. it is more likely to run with males aswell. i don't think any of this is proven
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replied July 10th, 2009
Hello,
I am a Mental Health Nurse so i am interested in Autism but do not know the facts of Autism and Genetics.

However..

Both my brother and sister have Autism. They share the same mum and dad. I do not have Autism and have a different dad. Yet, my brother and sister's dad has another child, with another women, who is not Autistic. Therefore it could just be two vulnerable genes mixed together?
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replied July 16th, 2009
My Grandfather had Asperger's; so did my Father, now I have the most severe Asperger's out of the lot.

It's extremely hereditary in my family. However, in others, I do not know.
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replied September 10th, 2009
Hmmm, I think this is a very complicated question. In general terms, as I understand it, Asperger's and Autism are not hereditary in themselves, but the likelihood of developing these conditions are. As I understand it, they are very complicated conditions that seem to have different triggers in developing the disease for different people. As such, I would highly recommend, that since you know there is a chance of being hereditarily predisposed to developing either of these conditions, it would be in your child's best interest to do whatever you can to avoid triggers. Some known triggers are caesin, gluten, certain vaccines, artifical sugars, certain chemicals in food, etc... It would also be in your husband's best interest to avoid triggers as well as they not only trigger the condition but are known to aggrivate the condition and make it worse. You need to do research on the internet. Read as much as you can. I think you will be surprised to learn that there are things you can do to help your baby.
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replied December 18th, 2009
I have Asperger's disorder (which as we all know is a Pervasive Devlopmental Disorder on the Autism Spectrum). I have a little sister on my dad's side with ADHD (also a PDD).. My theory is that yes it is hereditary, but then again, no one knows I have Asperger's Disorder unless I tell them or they either have or have worked with people who have it (such as a parent of an Aspie or spouse of one).

Question is: Will you love the child or your signifigant other any less if it does have asperger's or autism in any form? I feel offended just reading your post. If you are really so appalled with the thought of your child being differently abled, my boyfriend and I are talking about having kids but I'm not able to. We'll adopt it no matter what the problem is. If you are so scared of a challenge, give it up. Let have a more loving and better life.
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replied September 10th, 2012
Asperger mom
I just had to reply. My daughter has Asperger's. If I had known that I would have a child that would have to live her entire life in constant torment and her own personal hell, I would never have gotten pregnant! I see the pain she goes through every day of her life and my heart aches for her. Her tears every night could fill an ocean. No matter how much we love her and show it, it doesn't help.
I would tell anyone who has even an inkling that their child is different to get help for them as young as possible. Don't wait until they are 12 like I did.
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replied October 14th, 2012
Aspergers Syndrome
Hi a family member has AS but is only 3 can I just ask how come your daughters wasn't diagnosed until her teens ?
Did she present the behaviours of AS at an early age ?
is it something that gets worse as the child gets older ?
I hope you don't think me too
personal I'm just trying to understand AS
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replied October 11th, 2014
So you'd rather not have your daughter at all.

That is messed up, madam.
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replied February 13th, 2010
asperger syndrome
My daughter married a guy, whose brother has asperger, she is now pregnant, is there a chance of her having a baby with asperger syndrome?
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replied May 24th, 2010
My son has Asperger's. My husband's maternal grandfather, and uncle do also, as does one of his cousins (son of said uncle). And many of the rellies on that side have some tendencies that way. So yes, there does seem to be a genetic component. I think it is a good thing to be aware of right up front, because the earlier you know, the more support and help you can give the child, and the better they'll be able to cope with this big wonderful world. It can be a confusing and distressing place for even the most neurotypical of us!
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replied July 3rd, 2010
Yes, Aspergers can be hereditary. My daughter was daignosed with this at age 12 years as the doctors all said ADHD, as it can be misdaignosed as there are alot of similarities with ADHD. She now has a 4 year old that is showing signs of Aspergers and the doctors are addressing this but unfortunately he is still too young to be properly daignosed. Aspergers is part of Autism family but the austism Association is still looking into how it is connected. There are two types of Aspergers - 1. Is the brain in overdeveloped while the body is underdeveloped 2. Is the brain is underdeveloped and the body is overdeveloped. My daughter has the later, she reached puberty at the age of 9 years old. It is mostly as Social problem as well.

I hope this helps you.

Thanks

Sue
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replied October 24th, 2010
Yes, it is hereditary, I am afraid. As a person with a brother and uncle with Asperger's Syndrome, and a cousin and aunt wth severe Autism, I worry that any child I may have has a chance of becoming autistic, and I understand your worries, somewhat. However, I am fifteen and hope for that possibility not to be available for some time, while you are in that situation, now. I hope it all works out for you.
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replied May 15th, 2011
runs in the family
I have been studying my family geneaology and I have found my nephew, now 18 has diagnosed Aspergers Syndrom. Because of the stigma of "mental Health" no one talks about it, yet my cousin's son seems to have problems but never got help. I have a cousin I never met that seems to be the same. These kids could have gotten help but it was a secret.
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replied December 29th, 2011
My son only found out at age 42 that he had Aspergers we didnt think anything was wrong except he was an excessive hoarder and collector and didnt have a drivers licence because he was to worried about driving but when his work told him to get his licence he panicked and whent to a specialist and he said he had it and told him he could get his licence and he did and only his family know he has it. He has the best general knowledge and memory of anyone I know. You wouldnt know he had it unless you lived with him and seen how he stresses about everything in life. He has no desire to get married and have children and still lives at home.
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replied January 31st, 2012
Aspergers
My 45 year old son had ADHD before it was ever heard of.I struggled to bring him up without any help from health professionals or doctors.He grew up to have a successful career in the police.His son who is now 16 was never formally diagnosed with an autistic spectrum disorder, but I recognised it from an early age. He has learning difficulties,along with other minor problems.
It hit me like a bolt out of the blue some weeks ago that my husband actually has Aspergers, which looking back over the very difficult years of our marriage is glaringly obvious. I have discussed this with his sister, and she acually thought their mother had some sort of asperger type difficulties.
This thing is a curse, and unfortunately does seem to be carried in the genes.
My children never had a father they could look up to and now have a very difficult relationship even in adulthood. I feel guilty because I have carried on this dreadful situation even to my lovely grandson, whose grandad is like a stanger, who has no input into his life,it's just like history repeating itself.
What help is there anywhere ????
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replied June 21st, 2012
I am saddened that people still think that having AD is a curse. I am 24 years old, and I have Asperger's Disorder. I consider it a gift, without it I would not have had the experiences I've had in my life (both good and not so good.) I have a family that loves me; no matter how much I drive them crazy and visa versa; friends that have my back when things get bad, and am persuing a carreer in the medical field.

Hans Asperger was quoted during the Nazi regime defending the need for people who have similar diagnosis as me saying, "We are convinced, then, that autistic people have their place in the organism of the social community. They fulfill their role well, perhaps better than anyone else could, and we are talking of people who as children had the greatest difficulties and caused untold worries to their care-givers."

We are called "Little professors" because of our knowlage. We are human beings, and the strength of our character shines through when we are given a chance.

We do not need sympathy, as it implies that we are something that is not worth a second glance. We need acceptance. Fear of having a child that is not "normal" has caused nothing but hurt.

So, ask again if this diagnosis is a curse. I sure do not think so. If anything, it has made me stronger.

That's all I have to say about the matter. Thank you for reading my opinion.
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replied September 14th, 2012
Asperger's Syndrome
Wow, I like your outlook. Though undiagnosed, I think Asperger's runs in my family - my Nana, father, sister, niece probably had/have it - and I have tendencies towards it as well. My oldest son (15) has it, and we think one of the twins (13) does as well. We had him tested a few years ago, and they came up ADD. As most of us know, one can be mistaken for another, and we're waiting for him to be test specifically for Asperger's.

The diagnoses don't change who the people are, but help others to understand them, and them to understand and accept themselves. I explain it to people this way: the majority of people think in one direction, forward, if you will. Those with true autism or other major issues think sideways or backwards. They live in their own world, and have little or no understanding that another world exists. Sadly, we aren't able to have them become a large part of our lives due to the different worlds we live in. People with Asperger's or other ASD's, though, think a bit off to the side. They think differently, but DO understand that the majority of people are forward-thinking. This is a great example of thinking outside the box.

The world needs these people, and should rejoice in having them in their lives. It is believed that Bill Gates and Albert Einstein both have/had Asperger's. I often use them as examples of how much the world can benefit from them and to positively influence my boys.

Sadly, my father, sister and niece have never been diagnosed, and won't listen to the possibility that they might indeed have it.

I hope other Aspies and parents of them read this and get something positive out of it. Yes, it can be hard, but it can also be great.
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replied September 14th, 2012
You obviously aren't a 12 year old girl. I don't think it's a curse but she does and because of how she feels, I do have empathy for her. I try and show her the good things about it but those things will never measure up to the rejection and bullying she goes through. I'm sure as she gets older she will see the positives, but for now, her life is hell.
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replied December 9th, 2012
Asperger's Syndrome
I totally agree with you Aspergers Syndrome is a gift!
My son is 15 and is the most loving, caring witty and intelligent young man I could wish for. He was finally diagnosed at about 8 years old and since then our family have supported him tirelessly to understand the way the world works and how to understand the social norms that are required to get on in life. He understands that he thinks differently to the majority of his peers and has a deep understanding of the differences between them - unlike his peers who are very limited in their understanding. He too is hoping to go into the medical field and is a very inteligent young man.
When we finally understood why he was the way he was we realised that his dad also has Aspergers and many of our family members have traits. My daughter is expecting a baby early next year and we hadnt even thought about the possibility of the baby having it as it isnt such an issue it just takes a little patience and a different parenting style.

More people should post positive sides of Asperger's Syndrome as it is not a curse!
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replied September 14th, 2012
Oh and having sympathy for someone does not mean you feel they are worthless.
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replied September 22nd, 2012
My husband is 33 and only recently diagnosed as being an Aspie. Looking back at our 12 years of marriage and his childhood (via his parents and things he has told me) its so obvious! His super hero name is Encyclopedia Man! A good friend even made a cape (prior to the diagnosis). LOL We are still in the process of this new way of thinking and for him on how to deal with the OCD aspect of it. We were told by his psychologist that it can passed on in family but not necessarily from direct parents or at all. In fact, according to Dr. Tony Attwood the father may take on many of the Asperger's traits of their child. Its very true in this case. My father in law can be very Aspie with his knowledge of everything and social issues. However, he has never been evaluated nor had the need. He has held down a job and does very well in life. My husband has two cousins that are AS though and one that is schitzophrenic. We think one of our children may be on the spectrum but aren't sure at this time. Read
A Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome" By Tony Attwood. It has really helped to understand what AS is and what it is not.
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replied January 10th, 2013
I agree that Aspergers should not be considered a disorder. My boyfriend of 14 months was diagnosed as a child, 15 or so years ago, which I only found out very recently. He was afraid to admit this to me, as he was worried I would see him differently and worry that our children would end up with Aspergers as well. Had he not told me he had been diagnosed, I never would have known, dispite studying years of psychology at university. He is one of the most brilliant people I know, having recently graduated from engineering at a presigious university. The way I see it, Aspergers comes with its advantages and disadvantages. He worked extremely hard on improving his social skills throughout primary and high school, to the point where it is unlikely he would be rediagnosed with Aspergers at this stage. It is definitely not a curse, and in many ways can be a great gift. There is nothing I would like more than for our children to take after their father in every way.
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replied March 28th, 2013
aspergus
hello i think my daighter of 3 has aspergus ,and my partner ,can anyone give me and sign that i think my daughter is showing ,she changes her cloths alot ,wont look at me in the face ,is very very bright .hand washes alot .smells things that normal children wouldnt point out ,and sees thing normal 3 year olds would notis ,like people having new shoes .she wets her self all the time ,but still has nappys at nigth .
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replied April 3rd, 2013
yes it's heredetary you should consult a doctor first.
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replied May 31st, 2013
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