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Intestinal distress after eating

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For the past couple of years I have been experiencing some odd symptoms. After every meal I am almost immediately affected by nausea and intentional distress. The nausea is almost like an extreme 'fullness' but is never followed by vomiting (although sometimes I wish it would to alleviate my symptoms!). I almost always have a loose BM after I eat, certainly if I eat anything unhealthy. I also usually feel very tired and withdrawn/'cranky' after meals (boyfriend notices this). These symptoms have become a part of my every day life- I am no overly concerned but am being pushed by family and boyfriend to figure out what's going on. I do not over eat: I am 24, 5'2 and 96lbs (BMI 17.6) so I am actually considered underweight. I am concerned about a gallbladder issue but I don't fit the profile. I had general blood tests done at a physical a year ago, all of which came back 'normal' according to the doctor. Gallbladder function should have shown in liver tests I assume? Any ideas?

Additionally: if you agree that it may be my gallbladder, what remedies would you recommend? I worry about the 'liver cleansing' programs for fear that I would lose too much weight.
As far as seeing a doctor (although I've mentioned it before and no one has thought anything of it), what tests should I ask for? Anything else I should consider?
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First Helper jawilk
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replied June 20th, 2008
Have you ever had endoscopy? If not, my sugestion would be to ask your doctor to send you to a gasterentologist. I have this problem alot...almost feels like someone is tearing at my stomache. I found out a few years ago that I had a hiatal hernia that was caused by my acid reflux and that is what is causing the pain. You may need some medication.
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replied August 8th, 2008
Re: intestinal distress after eating
The symptoms you describe almost perfectly match those my husband has. He started having these symptoms in his early 20s. He's 30 now, 6'1", 165lbs (BMI of 21.Cool. He's never had an endoscopy, and has never received an entirely satisfactory diagnosis. The closest thing he's found that seems to be roughly applicable is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). A lot of the dietary guidelines they suggest seem to apply, although most sources that describe IBS fail to mention nausea, which is a symptom you and he both experience.

For him, the big no-no's are 1) STRESS, 2) LACK OF SLEEP, followed by 3) HIGH FAT (e.g. alfredo sauces, fast food), 4) CAFFEINE, and--to a far lesser extent--5) alcohol. He also suspects that high fructose corn syrup might be a contributing factor. These are particularly problematic when they are combined. For example, going to a stressful meeting and drinking caffeine (and, heaven forbid, eating an eggs/bacon/sausage breakfast) after a short night--especially one that involved a lot of alcohol--would be awful. He HAS said that at night, one beer can actually help to relax his stomach, and that if stress can be avoided--ESPECIALLY if he can get 9-10hrs of sleep a night--his tolerance to the other factors goes way up.

You said you don't overeat; that's good for him too--small meals are more tolerable than big meals. The opening of a Trader Joe's (grocery store) in our area has been a godsend in our lives, as it has made it easier and more affordable to eat well. If stress/lack of sleep can't be avoided, he either chooses not to eat at all or tries very bland carbohydrates like plain rice, bread, crackers, etc. But even so, the problem sometimes defies all explanation, occurring even when he's been "good." Not only is it painful, but it becomes extremely frustrating and discouraging because of its unpredictability and the impossibility of controlling it completely.

The only test I can think to suggest is perhaps a blood sugar analysis. I've heard that high blood sugar (like you might get after a meal if your blood sugar is not well-regulated) can lead to the irritability/fatigue symptoms you describe (but not the intestinal symptoms).

You have our empathy, and we wish you the best of luck in finding a way to decrease your symptoms. If you discover any ways to improve your condition, please let us know. You're not alone!
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Users who thank jawilk for this post: Deaddancer 

replied August 8th, 2008
Re: intestinal distress after eating
The symptoms you describe almost perfectly match those my husband has. He started having these symptoms in his early 20s. He's 30 now, 6'1", 165lbs (BMI of 21.Cool. He's never had an endoscopy, and has never received an entirely satisfactory diagnosis. The closest thing he's found that seems to be roughly applicable is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). A lot of the dietary guidelines they suggest seem to apply, although most sources that describe IBS fail to mention nausea, which is a symptom you and he both experience.

For him, the big no-no's are 1) STRESS, 2) LACK OF SLEEP, followed by 3) HIGH FAT (e.g. alfredo sauces, fast food), 4) CAFFEINE, and--to a far lesser extent--5) alcohol. He also suspects that high fructose corn syrup might be a contributing factor. These are particularly problematic when they are combined. For example, going to a stressful meeting and drinking caffeine (and, heaven forbid, eating an eggs/bacon/sausage breakfast) after a short night--especially one that involved a lot of alcohol--would be awful. He HAS said that at night, one beer can actually help to relax his stomach, and that if stress can be avoided--ESPECIALLY if he can get 9-10hrs of sleep a night--his tolerance to the other factors goes way up.

You said you don't overeat; that's good for him too--small meals are more tolerable than big meals. The opening of a Trader Joe's (grocery store) in our area has been a godsend in our lives, as it has made it easier and more affordable to eat well. If stress/lack of sleep can't be avoided, he either chooses not to eat at all or tries very bland carbohydrates like plain rice, bread, crackers, etc. But even so, the problem sometimes defies all explanation, occurring even when he's been "good." Not only is it painful, but it becomes extremely frustrating and discouraging because of its unpredictability and the impossibility of controlling it completely.

The only test I can think to suggest is perhaps a blood sugar analysis. I've heard that high blood sugar (like you might get after a meal if your blood sugar is not well-regulated) can lead to the irritability/fatigue symptoms you describe (but not the intestinal symptoms).

You have our empathy, and we wish you the best of luck in finding a way to decrease your symptoms. If you discover any ways to improve your condition, please let us know. You're not alone!
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replied August 30th, 2009
Completely Agree!
I am thinking I suffer from the same thing. The only thing is that my pains last no longer than 5 minutes. I am 20, tall and skinny, non atheletic, this started when I was 17. I was actually drinking a Mountain Dew.

I have also been to the doctor about this as well and they ran 3 tests, I actually cant remember what they were... but they kind of dismissed it but they did give me some minty tasting tablets that dissolve in my mouth that i am supposed to take before eating... but that just seems dumb to me because it is unpredictable and doesnt happen every meal. But yes, i have come to determine its foods high in non-natural ingredients like high fructose whatever. Happens when I eat Arby's curly fries for example, peanut butter, etc.
And also, I agree with you, the closest thing I can relate it to is IBS. But severe severe pain. Makes me sweat and I always get kind of panicky.

I REALLY wish doctors knew what all this was about. I cant believe no one has ever heard of this before. And this website was the first place I have found that has ANYTHING related to what I am going through (out of hundreds of websites I have checked).

Thank you for sharing your problems.

Steph
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replied October 4th, 2012
Consider that sugary foods are growing bad bacteria and yeasts in your intestine. As they grow, they release gases that poison our brain with chemicals. One is tetanus, others are alcohol and acytelhide(?). See the book Gut and Psychology Syndrome, then Nourishing Traditions.
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replied September 18th, 2010
Me too! Since having my gall bladder out the cramps are worse. High Fructose Corn Syrup is the worst. Cramps and bathroom issues within 20 minutes. Finding additives, preservatives and fat are the culprit. Doctors have no clue. Very frustrating.
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replied September 23rd, 2010
listtenlittle one. All the symptoms you mentions, as well as several of the other replies indicates that you digestive pH is out of balance. People with Hypochlorhydria or Hyperchlorhydria have virtually all of the symptoms you are having. Both conditions result in abdominal pain, gas, bloating, nausea, reflux, irregular stool, diarrhea, constipation. There is a very quick and patient friendly test that can be done to find out what is going on in your digestive tract. It is called a gastro gram, or Heidelberg pH diagnostic test. It will tell you if you are over producing acid, under producing acid, if you have dumping syndrome, pyloric insufficiency, heavy mucus in the gut from infection, acute or sub-acute gastritis and much more. Search on the net under pH capsule. Everything you are experiencing tells me you really need to get the test
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