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Intense Exercise Training and Gout (Page 1)

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I have heard of advice with regard to exercise that intense exercises could be gout triggers. I personally believe not so much with the intensity of training, but the type of exercise itself as the trigger. I deadlift twice my body weight and squat nearly as much in the gym and I have no problem with this intensity.

I don’t know how many of my fellow gout sufferers lead a very active lifestyle. I have discovered from my own experience with gout over the last 3 years that certain sports may be a serious gout trigger. I have noticed that once I have my gout under control, using the advice from this forum, I could keep this evil condition at bay until I start Brazilian Jiujitsu again.

I practiced Brazilian Jiujitsu (BJJ), kickboxing and train in the gym 3x a week.

I remember keeping my gout under control from January 2006 to April 2008 by taking Colchicine, Allorpurinol for about 3 months before stopping the medication completely and only taking Baking Soda. I ate what I liked and consumed alcohol moderately.

During this time I still practiced kickboxing and bodybuilding with no flare up. Then in January 2008 I started BJJ and by April I had my most painful and prolonged attack since summer 2005.

By July I had my gout under control again and I continued with baking soda and using the advice from Painfree to train myself to sleep sideways. I was tested negative for sleep apnea but I still slept this way because it cured my snoring indefinitely as a minimum benefit! giggle

Up until this point, I stopped BJJ but continued kickboxing and gym. I continued with bs and sleeping side ways. All was fine I thought, so in October I started intense training in BJJ again alongside all the other training.

Come 6 Nov I felt my gout was surfacing again. I took my 0.5mcg Colchicine 4x a day for 2 days and it receded 4 days later. I stopped my Colchicine, as I only want to take the least amount of medication as possible, and full blown gout came 2 days later.

At the moment I’m dealing with this with low doses of Colchicine for the next 2 weeks or so to get under control again.

I suspect BJJ training puts tremendous pressure on my feet and the constant need to bend my toes. Does anyone share my experience on this?

I feel that in my case Baking soda, sleeping sideways, eating cherries all help to keep my gout under control but there are triggers that override all benefits these remedies provide.

Twentyfive
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First Helper Jimbob1208
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replied November 20th, 2008
Supporter
Thanks for the tips! Very helpful.
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replied April 15th, 2011
Gout and weight lifting?
I am also wondering if weight lifting might be a trigger for gout. I have been on daily Colchicine for the last 6 months as I had a very severe allergic reaction to allopurinol last year. No real gout attacks until I started weight lifting again about 3 weeks ago. It's probably the worst in three years since I last lifted heavy weights. It's making me think that there is a link. My Gout was the worst when I was in my late 20's and 30's when I lifted consistently. I am 47 now.
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replied October 19th, 2013
I just read a study of the in the journal of biochemistry that summarized there was a link between extreme exercise, lactic acid production and how it reduces the kidneys ability to excrete uric acid. Apparently lactic acid takes "precedence" in the metabolism hierarchy within the kidneys, contributing in the buildup of uric acid. I found this true in my case. The 2 major gout attacks I have had in my life (the first was 5 years ago before I knew what gout was) were triggered by coming back to weightlifting and after a very strenuous week of "getting back into the groove". Massive soreness thanks to being out of shape compounded with an atkins diet... perfect storm for gout.

This last week I started back up again. Lower body squats, lunges. Sore for 5 days. Slight tinge started in toe and figured it would go away. Second round of lower weight workout.. a lot of soreness again and wham - massive gout attack next day. It all makes sense now. The 2 "major" attacks have come right after major lactic acidosis episodes in conjunction with bad diet. I have had smaller episodes over 5 years but the big ones have been with excessive exercise - lower body soreness especially.
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replied November 21st, 2008
Experienced User
I do karate in bare feet. I know even when I have just a small hint of gout pain it can affect how I move in karate. But, I do not think training in bare feet for me has an affect upon my gout.

I have suspected that it was the amount of sweating I did. I use to get bad gout attacks if I went running in the hot summer and lost alot of water. So, for the last few years in summer I have been drinking 2liters of water a day. That seems to have helped.

I hope other people can add to this thread, because I would be interested in hearing how others feel exercise and gout are connected.

Good luck with things.
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replied November 21st, 2008
re
Makoto wrote:


I have suspected that it was the amount of sweating I did. I use to get bad gout attacks if I went running in the hot summer and lost alot of water. So, for the last few years in summer I have been drinking 2liters of water a day. That seems to have helped.

I hope other people can add to this thread, because I would be interested in hearing how others feel exercise and gout are connected.

Good luck with things.


the same here...
I'm trying to figure out what's triggering my gout. For me sweating works, I believe in detoxification. I do hot yoga (Bikram yoga) a few times a week (we do 26 postures it in a heated room +40C for 90 min and sweat as hell). I talked to other people with arthritis problems who does hot yoga and everyone said it helps a lot. Personally I can confirm it helps for my gout also. However when play volleyball it worsens and I get an attack the same night or next day. Yesterday I read this forum and decided to drink BS just before the game so I did. Last night I got a feeling it's coming so I took arthrotec, so far so good.
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replied January 1st, 2009
Hi I am 21 and have had gout for almost 2 years. Only recently I have started intense exercising to lose weight. I have been doing 3*50 min weight sessions a week followed by 20 min cardio (bike or cross trainer) and on the days which i do not do weights i do 2*30 min cardio sessions (bike/cross trainer).

So far this intense exercising has not led to any gout attacks, whether this is because i dont exercise my toes much, or that exercise is not bad for gout i do not know. I have been eating properly and drinking 5-6 litres of water a day. Hope this helps.
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replied January 16th, 2009
what are those triggers, other than the brazilian kickboxing? I've been having foot problems for four or five years but i always attributed it to running. turns out is is gout. not sure if it was the running or certain foods.
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replied January 19th, 2009
Experienced User
I also suspect the pounding on the feet, and toes, may bring on an attack. I stubbed my toe hard one time, and the next day I had an attack in the same toe. Also, after a karate work out, and some pounding on the feet, I have gotten an attack.

But, mainly for me is not keeping myself hydrated enough in the warmer months.

Quitting smoking was another benefit.

Also also use negative ion wraps. I do not know if you can get them where you are, but I can get them here cheap in Japan. I believe they might work.

BS is also great.

But, all I can say is water water and water if you sweat alot and exercise. Keep yourself hydrated. In the warm months I drink about 2liters of water. This summer I did not have an attack. Actually, I am going on 9 or 10 months now, and no attack.

Like I said, for me quitting smoking and drinking more water helped me.
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replied January 19th, 2009
are you drinking baking soda as well?
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replied January 23rd, 2009
Experienced User
No, I am not driking BS now. I used to, and believe it works. I am not against it. However, I just drink water. 2 liters a day, and more if needed.

But if I get the feeling I might have a gout attack coming, I would have no problem in putting BS into my water as well. I will do everything I can to not have an attack. I do recommend the negative ions though. Use it all at once or the same time.
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replied February 1st, 2009
Hi
I have been taking baking soda for a few days now after i learnt from this forum that BS is good in Gout.But i am having digestive problems.Am having a bad stomach most of the time.
I do not want to discontinue BS as this is the only good solution i have had after suffering from gout for more than 7 yrs.
Guys can anyone do something about my sotmach...
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replied February 3rd, 2009
apple cider vinegar may be easier to digest and it will achieve the same thing.
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replied February 10th, 2009
I have recently gone back to BJJ training. I know this is a high risk sport for me but I like so much that I want to figure out what I can do to continue without triggering severe gout attacks.

What I have done:

January Urate level: 0.51mmol/L ((9.18 mg/dL)
February Urate level: 0.41mmol/L (7.38 mg/dL)
March awaiting

I have decided to go back to 100mg Allopurinol for time being to bring urate level lower and take BS accordingly to see if that makes any difference than on previous occasions.

Also, I am monitoring my urine ph. I have found my ph would go down as low as ph5 from a usually higher reading after 2 hrs of work out.

Out of interest, I have decided to stay in guard position (stay lying on my back) rather than fight for top position and bending my toes excessively.

My findings:

I haven't had gout attacks from the last 2 workouts. But, I do feel my whole left foot twinging all day& night long for roughly 2 days after workout.

I am taking higher dose of BS before sleep (1 tsp) to counter the ph effect but I still wake up with a reading of 5.25-5.5 compared to a ph of 6-7 from this dose during non-training days.

Fighting from my back and not bending my toes maybe helping but the fact that my ph is so low means that the lactic acid may be overwhelming for my body to handle before it takes care of uric acid.

I will continue to record my findings and share it later if I discover anything new.

Twentyfive
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replied February 12th, 2009
what if you drank bd before the workout and acv directly following or even during the workout?
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replied February 13th, 2009
I am planning to drink BS water during workout next week.

I think this will help up the urine ph compared to last week, but not sure if this would shorten the period of those sensations in my foot. Read from a source can't remember where said lactic acid takes priority over uric acid for excretion.

During training days I will be taking 2-2.5 tsp bs. I have no breaks from bs now, only lower doses on non-traing days. I'm 29 this year so not worried about high blood pressure yet.

If your much older Apcoach, it's probably not a good idea to take bs the way I do.
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replied February 13th, 2009
Right, at 29 you've got some time. I'm 38 but I'm not training for 2 hours. I'm just doing 45 minutes of cardio and lifting weights. The past three days I've been taking 2 tsp of bs. when the twinges subside i'll go back to acv to balance the ph. acv is supposed to lower blood pressure. last night i took .5 tsp of bs and 2tblsp of acv before bed and twinges were reduced today. i think you can get a higher ph with less sodium by combining.

i think you are on to something with your lactic acid ideas. thinking back, most gout attacks of mine have followed tough workouts and overall body soreness. my goal is to improve my overall physical condition and mantain.

25, once again, thank you for all of the info you have shared. it really is helping me sort through this mess.
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replied February 16th, 2009
My pleasure mate. We are here to share tips and information with our fellow men(and ladies).

I personally have learnt invaluable knowledge from posters on this board such as JYY2 and Painfree and would like to give something useful back.

I hope you'll figure out your own ideal fitness routine without flare ups.
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replied February 18th, 2009
Gout Workouts
Hello all, I'm new to the site and have been reading over most all of the postings... sounds as if you guys have more of an idea then some of the Dr.'s I've seen! Anyway, I wanted to see if you guys could be so kind as to give me some much needed advise??? I am 30 yrs old and have had gout for about 7 yrs now. I grew up playing every sport possible and "used" to always be active, minus the last 4 or 5 yrs do to the pain and fear of another attack. I was a Police Officer in my early 20's and I am currently in the hiring process to get back into it. I have been advised that basic Physical Test required is a mile run, push ups, sit ups and other things. Just the thought of running a mile is enough to bring on an attack! haha Any advise on how to "prep" my body for the test coming up in a few weeks. I regularly take all my meds; Indometh, colch, allipur (350mg) and have started at least walking to build up. All replies welcome!! Thanks guys, hope to hear back soon!
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replied February 21st, 2009
Exercise and Gout
I'm 52 and up until 1 year ago I always exercised like a maniac at 80% of my max heart rate ( I wear a Polar Heart Rate Monitor) on Roller Blades, running, swimming, cycling, etc. Nine years ago, my gout attacks started in my knees. I didn't know what they were.

Last year when the pains began in my ankles and feet I finally got a diagnosis of gout. I've toned down my exercise intensity, have modified my diet (eliminating all soft drinks) and started taking the Baking Soda treatment, thank you for that recommendation, what a difference. I hope to some day get rid of these bleeping attacks.

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replied February 21st, 2009
can you tell us what your exercise routine was before and how you changed it? I wear a heart rate monitor as well. My heartrate never gets over 150. I don't know if that is too much.
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replied February 21st, 2009
If I was rollerblading, I'd skate at 80% (sometimes higher) of my maximum heart rate for 5 days in a row. I'd always exercise for at least an hour, sometimes as much as two hours. Then two days rest, which was tough to do (the rest I mean). I'd feel great, was losing weight and all was good until the gout attacks.

I'm trying now to skate at 60 to 70% of my maximum heart rate for 1 hour or less. It is difficult because I don't feel like I'm working hard enough, but I'm trying to eliminate exercise as one of the causes. I still am not sure if it is the only thing contributing. To get a feel for your intensity, determine your maximum theoretical heart rate (see Polar Website) then you'll know how your 150 bpm measures up.
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