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High systolic, low diastolic-pulse

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Hi,

I'm 26 y.o. male, fit and in good shape. But a few months ago got a surprise at the doctor's with high BP readings.

So changed diet, cut out salty foods, alcohol, exercised more, and got my bp to between 130 - 140 systolic. (I bought a BP monitor to home test).

Through reading online just found out about "Pulse Pressure" - the difference between systolic and diastolic numbers.

My systolic readings are between 130 - 140, but diastolic readings are consistently around 70, which give me a "pulse pressure" of around 60 - 70.

I've read around 40 is a normal pulse pressure. What should I do? Is there a way to reduce my systolic bp, while keeping my diastolic bp at this level? Do I need medication like ACE inhibitors or something to properly reduce my systolic bp?

Thanks Smile
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replied February 20th, 2010
Interesting. I've been monitoring my B/P for about 3.5 months. My average "pulse pressure" over 100's of readings during this period is around 50...130/80. Why I've been monitoring my "PP" I don't know...just did.
After seeing your post did a little googling. Sounds like it might be important. Any other opinions out there? Here is one article I found. The author says "PP" is very important to those over age 60. So far, I think I'm OK.
Good luck.
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Pulse Pressure is the difference between
the two blood pressure numbers
Pulse Pressure can be more important than the blood pressure itself. Learn more from this physician:



What Is It?
If you subtract the smaller blood pressure number from the larger one you get a number which is the Pulse Pressure. For example, a blood pressure of 120 over 80 yields one of 40 mm Hg (120 minus 80 = 40). Obviously it is the difference between the systolic and the diastolic pressures. Let's call it PP.

Thus there are three components to this (or any other) blood pressure reading: Systolic pressure (120), diastolic pressure (80) and pulse pressure (40). SBP, DBP and PP.


What Should the Pulse Pressure Be?
Studies have shown that this number should be no more than 60 mm Hg.


What Significance Does a High PP Have?
When greater than 60 mm Hg there is in increased incidence of adverse cardiovascular events especially in the older population.

In a study of over 5,000 men in Europe concluded in 2005 the risk of coronary heart disease for men with a PP of 70 or more was a whopping three times higher than that for men with less than 50. That is 200% more! Naturally, results were corrected for all other risk factors.

Men with hypertension had a 50% increase in major coronary events, at all ages.

The risk of coronary event associated with a PP of 70 or more was actually significantly higher than that associated with hypertension. Thus, PP may be a stronger predictor of risk than is hypertension.

It also appears to be an independent risk factor. In other words it adds risk to the other factors.

Generally, this phenomenon was not seen at less than 50 years of age, visible at 50-59, and strongest after 60.

In these three age groups: diastolic is more predictive in less than 50. At 50-59 systolic is most predictive and after 60 the pulse pressure is most important. As one ages there is a gradual shift in the strength of prediction of risk from diastolic to systolic to PP.

Results of several longitudinal studies in older patients with hypertension indicate that a high PP is a sensitive marker for carotid artery stenosis (narrowing), which increases the risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, and sudden death.

These results are consistent with those of the famous Framingham study in Massachusetts.

Other studies have somewhat differing results so the concept is not as clear as one would like. Some of the differences can be explained by differences in the study structure and by using different end-points such as mortality versus morbidity (events without death).



Doctor’s Practical Guide:
Which blood pressure is more desirable, 140/90 or 140/70 ? Most people (and probably doctors as well) would choose 140/70 as being best. But now you know that 140/90 is associated with less coronary heart events because the PP is less. 140/90 is the better blood pressure.

You might be thinking “Why haven’t I heard about this before?” The reason is that it is just now being recognized over the last 5 to 10 years. How long does it take to study the 10 year effect of something? 10 years, of course.

What should you do?

First, keep and eye on your blood pressure preferably by taking it yourself. (Actually, how else can you?) See this page How To Take Blood Pressure See also How To Take Blood Pressure Booklet

Second, if you see a wide pulse pressure tell your doctor so that you can be investigated for causes such as arteriovenous fistula, hyperthyroidism, etc.

Third, be aware that high blood pressure can be prevented by natural means such as weight control, diet, exercise, salt reduction and possibly by supplements. See Lower Blood Pressure See also Herbs That Lower Blood Pressure


Last, be aware that certain anti-hypertensive drugs and combinations thereof have a better effect on pulse pressure than others. Examples are diuretics and certain calcium channel blockers.

On a lighter note, you probably won’t run into this problem while you are under 50 years of age. But why not prevent it? Read more of these pages and learn how to control your blood pressure. Yourself, that is.



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replied February 21st, 2010
Hi, thanks for your reply!
That was some good information. I spoke to a doctor the other day, he said the simplest thing will be to try to get my systolic bp lower, which will reduce my pulse pressure. So I've got it down to around 130/70. Hopefully getting it down to 120/70 or so will reduce the pp further - i.e. to 50, rather than 60-70!
As you point out, it seems to be more of an issue for the 60+ age group. But I guess it's good to keep your eye on it.
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replied March 11th, 2010
Your welcome.
How are you planning on getting down to 120?
How many BP readings a day do you take? Generally I do 3 or 4...when I first get up; after a walk but before lunch, after supper and a little stroll; and before bed. Then I average them out for the day. Generally my 1st reading is lowest of the day and my last reading is the highest. Regarding Pulse Pressure, through the day I can be 45 - 60+ on individual readings (haven't hit 70 yet) and average for the day around 51 now.
I'm surprised there hasn't been more discussion about PP unless there is another thread on it somewhere?
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replied March 11th, 2010
Hi again ~
Well, diet (a lot more veg/fruit e.g. grapefruit) and exercise are my focus areas to get bp down.
I usually do 3 readings a day, like you lower in the morning, higher in the evening.
Haven't seen much about PP on forums/threads though.
Well, guess I'll ask a doctor about it next time I have a check up.
Cheers!
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replied March 13th, 2010
About 6 months ago I had to go to the doctors for an injury on my left hand and for reasons tha i cant explain I asked him to take my B.P. Yes you guessed it -It was very high 230/110.The doctor who ran a one man show was more panicking about it than me.with in an hour I was seen by an interventional Cardiologist who prescribed 4 different medication that brought my blood pressure to 140/80.At the hospital they did all the tests to eliminate secondary reasons.Since there was none to speak of the doctor thinks that i have hardening of arteries as I am 62 years old.I am 5'11" and 170 pounds and I do weight training and walking for 1.5 hours 5 days a weak don,t smoke,drink or eat any fatty foods. Can anybody tell me how can I get my arteries better?
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replied March 13th, 2010
vjs
You might want to start a new thread as your subject ("how can I get my arteries better?") will be seen by more people that way than buried in this thread.
I'll ask here anyway...are you still on meds??? or were they (hopefully) temporary?
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replied April 24th, 2010
vjs wrote:
About 6 months ago I had to go to the doctors for an injury on my left hand and for reasons tha i cant explain I asked him to take my B.P. Yes you guessed it -It was very high 230/110.The doctor who ran a one man show was more panicking about it than me.with in an hour I was seen by an interventional Cardiologist who prescribed 4 different medication that brought my blood pressure to 140/80.At the hospital they did all the tests to eliminate secondary reasons.Since there was none to speak of the doctor thinks that i have hardening of arteries as I am 62 years old.I am 5'11" and 170 pounds and I do weight training and walking for 1.5 hours 5 days a weak don,t smoke,drink or eat any fatty foods. Can anybody tell me how can I get my arteries better?
. I got for you and free a special kind of garlic tu cure your arteries..just write me.
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replied February 1st, 2011
Chelation for heavy metals, green juices, vegan diet
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replied May 3rd, 2011
pulse pressure/hard arteries
Have you been taking too much of ice-cold water or other drinks with lot of ice, in your life?
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