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Hard lump below knee (Page 1)

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I have a hard lump just below and on the right of my left knee slightly smaller than a golf ball. It feels like a bone but i don't have one on the other knee. It doesn't hurt but it is noticeable especially when my leg is straight. Any ideas on what it is?
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First Helper User Profile RoogieRoo
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replied January 27th, 2009
You should really go get that check out by your doctor. A high school friend recently passed away after a year and a half long battle from cancer, which started from a lump that was found at the back of her knee area. I hope that whatever it is, is something minor, but hopefully you get it checked out soon.
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replied November 21st, 2012
got the same prob, went to docter she said it is bone that groes do to sports.and other things like,mine herts because iam on knees at work tileing floors and climbing.
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replied January 28th, 2009
Thankyou i will. But it's on the front, not back.
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replied June 23rd, 2009
lump on knee
My cousin discovered a lump on the side of the right knee a year ago, she went through Chemo and was declared cancer free. About 2 weeks ago she was having problems with a cough was diagnosed with pneumonia. After further testings doctors had found that cancer had spread to the lungs was told had from 3 weeks to 3 months to live. She's currenly on Hospice care. Please get your lump checked out. God Bless.
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replied June 30th, 2012
My lump is very hard and is on the right side of my left knee just below my knee cap.
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replied August 4th, 2009
lump below knee on side
To Hippi/Pippi -- did you have your "hard lump" below your knee diagnosd? I hope it turned out ok. best, GS
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replied June 27th, 2010
cooie
It's not cancer, I have that too on my knee. Many of my friends have it too, and it seems to be people that do a fair bit of sport/exercising that get it. You can get pills for it too which gets rid of it. I haven't done that yet because i'm too lazy to go to the doctors :/
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Users who thank eddaw27 for this post: lyovnello 

replied July 27th, 2010
yeah i have the same thing, it kind of hurts when touched or pressure is put upon it, it's weird i have had it for a while and never thought anything of it, then my mum told me its not normal, ever since then its started hurting and ive noticed when it hurts, weird how that works out. but yeah im gona see a doctor and ill let you know of my diagnostics
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replied February 7th, 2011
Lump Below Knee is Patellar Tendonitis
I have the same lump, just below the knee cap. My doctor diagnosed it as patellar tendonitis (AKA Jumpers Knee). It's odd as it is only on my left knee, growing up I had Osgood Schlatter's disease which is the very painful stretching of your patellar tendon due to rapid growth and over-activity common in teenagers. I used to run almost everyday, and was training for half-marathons, but my knee pain became just too much, so went to the doc and he suggested taking a month of rest. However, it's been over 3 weeks and I don't see any progress, my tendon is still sore when I would try an isolated body weight squat with my left leg. I always ice my knee, and have been using a heating pad and taking IB Prof. for reducing the swelling, but haven't seen any positives as of yet. I'm fairly sure it's Patellar Tendonitis though, I've been doing my homework on it and the pain is right below the kneecap, with the large bump where the tendon connects with the tibia. Really sucks not being able to run, and even more aggravating not seeing any real healing, anyone have any ideas?
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replied November 21st, 2012
my docter put me on tramadol 50ml it does wonders for pain not quit a narcodic witch is good but thin i here it is going to be class. as one,o well at lest it helps pain.
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replied September 13th, 2013
I also was diagnosed with Osgood Schlatter's disease I had it since I was 14 years old and now I'm 19. I haven't been paying much attention as I should to my knees so I don't know how long the bump on my left knee on the right side was there. I happen to notice it last night when I was rubbing my leg. It feels like a small piece of bone and it feel like it's burning. Do you have any suggestions to what I should do. Thanks
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replied October 1st, 2013
Hello everyone. I just discovered a lump on my knee, after doing rugby. It doesnt hurt, and I have never noticed it before. It feels like bone, and like its sticking out of my skin when I flex my leg. Im worried its cancer. Please help
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replied June 8th, 2011
Red bump to right of knee cap
Can those who have had this reply and let me know what it ended up being? I have the exact same thing now. The spot is slightly red too.
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replied August 17th, 2011
IM afraid of mine's too it doesnt hurt when doing something but whe i accidentally hit a chair or anything on it it Pains a lot...ihope its not that serious
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replied August 17th, 2011
Especially eHealthy
reinu135,

Welcome to eHealth. I doubt if the other posters will answer you, as they posted quite awhile ago, and for several, it was their one and only post.

If you desire some information, you will need to give a little more information about your lump. As, where exactly is it? You describe the tenderness, but do you have other symptoms, like redness or warmth around the lump? Any other problems around the knee, such as decreased range of motion, laxity, locking, giving way, weakness, etc? Do you have any constitutional symptoms, such as fever, chills, nausea, malaise, weight loss, etc?

Good luck.
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replied February 6th, 2012
knot below the patella
A friend who is a Martial Artist,(owns and runs his own school) has the hard bony like lump just below the patella and hurts when touched, sometimes after a rigorous workout (grappling and such) he will develop more pain and swelling, it does not always have to be touched to have pain after this.
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replied September 28th, 2011
I also have a lump below my knee
I am not the original poster -- but I do have similar symptoms, a knot about 3-4 inches below my knee, about 1/2 way between front & outer leg. I can't see a bruise or redness on the outside, it is tender to the touch (doesn't hurt any unless I touch it), maybe a little warm - no other symptoms (no loss of motion, no weakness, no fever or chills or weightloss, etc.
I've only noticed it about a week - sorta hoping I bumped it - but seems like I'd see a bruise, and was thinking it would be getting smaller by now..
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replied September 28th, 2011
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DianeH,

If is it at the attachment of the patellar tendon (which is just about where you describe) it is most like an enthesopathy of that attachment.

In young persons (adolescents) this is called Osgood-Schlatter's Disease (OSG). There is an apophysis there (a growth plate than does not contribute to longitudinal height), and as such is a weak point. So, in young persons who do a lot of athletic activities such as sprinting, jumping, and kicking, they can develop a lump in that area. It is due to the body laying down more bone to strengthen the attachment from the stress being applied to it.

In adults, whose growth plates have closed, this area can still enlarge. Often repeated action across the tendon's attachment, puts stress on the fibers (Sharpy's fibers) that connect the tendon into the bone. This attachment becomes inflamed. This produces swelling and warmth in the area.

With time, the body will actually put down new bone, again, in an effort to strengthen the attachment.


However, this is just one theory. Without an examination and x-rays, it is impossible to tell you exactly what it lump is from.

If you are concerned about it, you should see an orthopedic surgeon. Good luck.
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replied September 28th, 2011
I have REALLY bad health insurance at the moment & am sorta hoping to stay away from the doc much at last until I get better insurance (which I hope should not be a problem since I am pretty healthy, just have made bad decisions trying to save $$ on health insurance...
If it is what you say it does not sound like too much to worry about - and I have been more active over the past couple of years than I did the 20 before that -- I am 50 now, and at 48 starting training to run in 5Ks (and have done that a few times but have decided that 10 minutes spurts of jogging are long enough for me!) -- also, have been wearing pedometer & trying to do 10,000 steps/day -- usually average only 5000 - 7000 but will keep trying... anyway, just last week before this lump appeared, had been trying to bounce, walk FAST, etc etc to get the 10K steps....
I will research the condition you mentioned.... and thanks so much for the reply!
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replied September 28th, 2011
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Diane,

Sounds like you have reason to have an enthesopathy (and/or patellar tendonitis) at the patellar tendon attachment. That is quite an increase in stress on that tendon.

Any time you contract your quads, it puts pressure on the patellar tendon. So, running, jumping, and kicking really pour on the stress.

The attachment may have been feeling some stress, and wanted to "glue" the tendon down a little better. Better to have a lump, than to rupture the tendon attachment. That would really be a problem!

If it is due to the inflammation from an enthesopathy, then rest and NSAIDs should decrease the warmth and any discomfort. But, the lump may stay.


If the lump really starts to grow or becomes very painful, then you really should consider seeing someome.


Congratualtions on your activity level. Most of us just get less active as we get older. Good for you!
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replied September 28th, 2011
painless hard lump under my knee
I have a large(+/-2") lump on the inside lower section of my left knee about 2 inches "southwest" of my knee cap. It is hard as a rock and doesn't move and isn't painful at all. I am 41. I had arthroscopic surgery on my torn meniscus of that knee about 6-7 years ago, which healed great. Really pops out when I straighten my leg and turn my foot to the outside. I did nothing to injure it. Am I right to have some reasonable concern? I don't want to go to the dr. for nothing.
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replied September 28th, 2011
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pickles3,

It sounds like the lump is basically at the joint line or just a tab bit below it. One thing this could be is a meniscal cyst. Especially since you have had meniscal surgery for a previous injury.

A meniscal cyst is essentially a ganglion cyst, which is an outpouching of the joint capsule, filled with joint fluid. Though these can be soft and squishy, many times they are very hard and firm. These do not move, since they are attached to the joint capsule.

The fact that yours is more prominent when you externally rotate the knee, makes something to do with the joint more likely. The fact that it is painless also tends towards the meniscal cyst (though some meniscal cysts do cause discomfort, most don't).


But, this is only a theory. Tumors tend to be painful, and that is usually their presenting symptom. Bursitis is another possibility, as there is a major one in that region, but again, these tend to be tender, warm, and a soft lump.

If it continues to bother you, starts to grow in size, or becomes painful, then you might want to consider seeing someone about it.

Good luck.
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replied November 4th, 2011
I just got an X-ray and an Ultrasound. The X-ray showed no stress, meaning that their was no evidence that i might have hit it which would have caused tissue build up and thus the lump. I'am having a test in a week, they will extract a sample to test what it is exactly.
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replied November 4th, 2011
I just got an X-ray and an Ultrasound. The X-ray showed no stress, meaning that their was no evidence that i might have hit it which would have caused tissue build up and thus the lump. I'am having a test in a week, they will extract a sample to test what it is exactly.
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replied November 4th, 2011
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nikiJ,

It is interesting that your surgeon is going to do an incisional biopsy, before doing a complete work-up of the mass. Usually, if the etiology of a mass is not clear, it will be evaluated with x-rays, bone scan, CT scan, MRI, and blood for labs, before doing a biopsy.

Also, it is usually recommended that the biopsy be done by the surgeon who would be taking care of the problem if it turned out to by malignant. Biopsies should never be looked at as a simple little procedure. It is very important that they be done by someone who knows exactly what he/she is doing; who knows the proper way to align the skin incision, knows how to not violate any more areas than necessary, and does not contaminate the neurovascular structures. An improperly done biopsy can have devastating consequences.


So, make sure that your surgeon is best physician you can get to do the biopsy.


Good luck. Hope the mass turns out to be something benign and easily taken care of.
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replied December 3rd, 2011
Hey
i have a large lump that is slightly larger then a golf ball just below my kneecap it hurts to push on it but there is no redness or bruising, if i knock it its agony,
I have had a lump there for as long as i can remeber but since starting the gym 3 months ago there has been pain behind the lump and a few days ago i was doing squats and felt a pop and a sharp pain along the back of the lump and since then beding bending it and bending it and putting my weight on it is really painful but there is no pain to normally walk also it is popping alot, i am quite overweight if that is anything to consider
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replied December 3rd, 2011
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breeza12345,

If the lump is at the attachment of the patellar tendon into the tibia (shin bone), it is most likely Osgood-Schlatter's Disease (OGS). This disorder starts when the patient is an adolescent. There is an apophysis at this attachment.

An apophysis is a growth plate, that does not contribute to longitudinal growth. There are a lot of them in the body. But, they are a weak spot. So, during adolescence, if there is stress applied across the apophysis (running, jumping, kicking, etc) the body will lay down more bone there, to make the area stronger. Thus, the patient develops a bony lump there.

It used to be seen only in young boys, but now that girls are doing more sports activities, they too are developing OGS.


The lump stops growing when the activity is lessened and when the patient reaches skeletal maturity. During adolescence, the area can become inflamed, being warm and red. In adult hood, the problem becomes an enthesopathy, which is an inflammation of the attachment of the tendon into the bone, at Sharpy's fibers. This is just a special type of tendonitis.


There have been known cases of the patellar tendon detaching from the tibia, in patients with OGS. But, if this were to happen, the patient would not be able to walk, extend the knee, bend, squat, etc.

It is possible to tear some of the fibers, without detaching the whole tendon. Which is essentially a significant strain (tear of tendon or muscle).

Popping, snapping, crunching, etc are very common in the knee, and is called benign crepitus. Its cause is usually not known. Sort of like cracking your knuckles, it occurs, but we still don't know why.


Strains of the patellar tendon attachment are basically treated like any other strain. Rest, decreased activity, compression, ice, NSAIDs (if you can take them). A special strapping used for this is called the Cho-Pat strap. Some patients find it more comfortable to do activities when wearing the strap.

Once the acute pain is decreased, then gradual get back into activities. Work slowly back into any explosive knee extension activities, such things as knee extensions on the weight machine, half squats (should avoid deep squats), kicking, sprinting, jumping, etc.


If you continue to have problems in that area, you might want to see an orthopedic surgeon. Being overweight just puts extra stress on the attachment. That is something that the tendon should be able to handle, but it may be a little uncomfortable at times.

Good luck.
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