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Half thyroid removed

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Hi All,
I had 1/2 my thyroid removed just over 11 years ago and was told that the other half would work just fine. Well that isn't the case. I have been on Eltroxin for the past 10 years but between the medication and inactive thyroid it has taken its toll on my hair, nails, skin. My hair has gotten so thin over the years, I used to have crazy thick hair and now it is at the point where my hairdresser is informing me I am having extreme hair loss. I have stopped taking my medication but I need to find a great alternative that can get the exsiting part of my thyroid up and running again. I am so tired, moody, and I look really worn out. Any helpl would be much appreciated! 4you

Vanessa
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replied December 29th, 2009
You need to take your medication..go talk to your GP..tell them your concerns, Your Thyroid will stop without the medication!!!!!
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replied December 31st, 2009
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Hi Nessie30,

It is time to have your condition and medication re-evaluated. After 10 years on the same drug; your body could be immuned to it which means it isn't working for your benefit any longer. By you stop taking it leaves you without any benefits from the medication. Consult your doctor and see if the best alternative for you would be to remove the other half of the thyroid and put you on other medications...people do live long and productive lives with out their thyroid, they just have to be on medication for life. Just have a good informative converstation with your doctor as to what the best treatment is for you. Take another responsible adult with you for support and to help you understand exactly what the doctor says and how it will affect your life. Also take a pen and paper to write down everything in case you have questions later.

Good Luck,

Faded Rose
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replied March 29th, 2010
Hello Nessie30,
I have just had half my thyroid removed 4 weeks ago and I am waiting to have a thyroid function test next week to see whether the remaining half is producing sufficient thyroxin on its own. I visited an Integrated Medicine Physician in London last week who mentioned that the major cause of goitre, thyroid nodules etc, is due to a chronic deficiency in iodine and manganese (not to be confused with magnesium).

Good luck

izzy
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replied January 29th, 2012
thyroid
if you have no thyroid can you take iodine and magnesium suppliments?
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replied March 30th, 2010
To the last person that posted,
I didn't have time to take a look at the article yet but I had planned on it but for some reason it is underreview.
The reason I had half removed was due to a large growth. I had already had it drained once and it was very painful, when it came back I just wanted it taken out. My DR of many years never did get my thyroid function tested after the operation and when I went back to her a year later telling her I had gained 40 pounds and felt horrible all the time she informed me I was lazy! ( I am far from lazy!). It wasn't until I went back to my original family DR that discovered on his own that my weight has increased pretty fast and he couldn't believe my thyroid had not been tested after the operation.
Now I think the problem is sometimes my half thyroid works fine and other times not at all.
Anyways I want to thank you very much for the previous link (just wish I had of book marked it yesterday) and will give it a good read when the post is back up.

Thanks
Vanessa
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replied March 30th, 2010
Hello Nessie30

Your situation was identical to mine - i had a large nodule, which as I mentioned was surgically removed a month ago in London. My endocrinologist has ordered a blood test next week to see if the half remaining thyroid is functioning normally. There are lots of natural ways to support your thyroid, particularly as I mentioned yesterday, iodine, which is critical. Additionally, the mineral Manganese is very important. I met with a physician last week who had gone down the integrated medicine route and he said that thyroid nodules are usually due to chronic iodine deficiency. the article in the link I sent you explains it. I have reposted it here. I dont know why my post has been removed.
It is interesting to see how much research there is on the web regarding iodine and thyroid nodules. Another great supplement is Maca root (from Peru). It is an adaptogen and provides nutritional support for the entire endocrine system without introducing external hormones. I do think some of these allopathic doctors are very quick to jump to conclusions and like to blame their patients in the most judgemental manner that does not help them. I am sure you felt very let down from your doctor when she implied you were lazy.
Good luck
Izzy (Perky8)
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replied March 30th, 2010
Okay great, I book marked it just incase it goes missing agian.
I have bought "pure iodine" at the health food store but unfortunatley it doesn't state the percentage at which potency it is. I doubt it is actually pure. The recomended dose is 1 drop a day but I find that hard to believe also. It states on the bottle that for each millilitre it contains 6.25mg. Wish I could figure out how much I really need. I have been losing my hair and eye lashes again and I think it is between my thyroid working and then not working and being on the meds again. My doctor blames my diet and says nothing else would cause this. It is pretty hard when you feel you are on your own.
I hope your tests go well and hopefully your thyroid will function just fine on its own.

Thanks again for the link.
Vanessa
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replied August 28th, 2010
See your dr and take iodised foods and kelp tablets from the health food store.

The health food store should have a qualified naturopath make an appointment
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replied October 26th, 2010
For thyroid issues, sometimes it's best to get a consultation. It may be smart to consult with a nauropathic physician before taking any over the counter natural supplements. Dosages and such are critical to proper healing. If anyone is interested, the number one hospital/doctors for endocrinology is Mayo Clinic in Rochester NY. THere are about 10 top hospitals around the country that excel in this speciality: Yale New Haven in CT; NY Presbyterian in NYC; Mass General in MA; Johns HOpkins in Baltimore; Ronald Regan in Los Angels; Cleveland Clinic. Get good advice, please.
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