Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Gout Forum

Gout and Potassium

Must Read
Gout is a common type of arthritis and accounts for about 5% of all cases of arthritic condition. But what is gout and what are the stages of this condition?...
Gout manifest for physical reasons...but what puts you at a greater risk of developing the disease? What risk factors should you avoid?...
Gout present symptoms mainly in the joints. Learn which signs to look for, and when you should seek medical help and diagnosis of gout....
sunny I have discovered that potassium lowers uric acid levels. I had a gout attack, so my doctor tested my uric acid levels and my potassium level and found that my uric acid was high and my potassium was low (I take a diuretic - Dyazide - half is a potassium-sparing medicine). She put me on potassium supplements. As soon as I took the potassium, the gout began to get better and within two days was totally gone. I then did research about what possible connection there was between taking the potassium supplement and the gout attack going away. That's when I found out that it's quite well known that potassium lowers uric acid levels. The prescription medicines for gout have some serious side effects. If you have gout problems, before you decide to take a prescription gout medication, ask your doctor to test your uric acid and potassium levels. If the uric acid is elevated and the potassium is low, see if your doctor will prescribe a potassium supplement for you. Important - Do not take potassium on your own - it must be done under a doctor's care.
Did you find this post helpful?
First Helper susana1027
|

replied November 20th, 2012
potassium bicarbonate against gout
Potassium deficiency is deeply involved in gout as an accentuating factor because uric acid is less soluble in acidic urine. Potassium bicarbonate supplements will reverse this. You may see this discussed in a book about potassium nutrition as it relates to heart disease, gout, rheumatoid arthritis diabetes, hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic shock (high blood potassium) available in http://charles_w.tripod.com/book.html along with the table of contents introduction, and first two chapters. In view of the fact that this is not considered by current rheumatologists, it would be very valuable for you to bring it into your future writing. It is not only that potassium is not considered by physicians in regard to gout, many of them do not even believe that a potassium deficiency is likely. This even though many of them prescribe what are actually supplements, but prescribed under euphemistic terms such as salt substitutes, sodium free baking powder, ORT salts (oral rehydration therapy for diarrhea), polarizing solutions, GIK (glucose, insulin, potassium) salts, vegetables, or glucosamine. A deficiency is further defined out of existence by defining the blood serum content normal as 4.2 when the actual figure is 4.8. For gout, though, the chloride is not acceptable. But potassium bicarbonate powder dissolved in fruit juice or half teaspoon sprinkled on cereal will work very well. It may be obtained from businesses which add it to wine.
Sincerely, Charles Weber
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied November 26th, 2012
Thanks so much for that information. I will definitely be looking up the reference to that book. I have been amazed at how little interest there seems to be in the connection between gout and potassium levels. Your reply is the one and only reply, and I made that comment almost a year ago. I would think that a person who is having problems with gout would love to have a solution that didn't involve those drugs the doctors usually give for gout. Strange. . .
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied November 26th, 2012
potassium bicarbonate for gout
Dear Susana,
It should not be necessary to get a doctors prescription if the blood contents is under 4.8 milliequivalents of potassium. There are enormous amounts of potassium in unprocessed diets (more than 3500 milligrams). To carry that proposal to its logical conclusion, one should get a prescription to eat food. I guarantee that no one will stop eating until they get a prescription. Potassium pills are dangerous because they can become lodged in an intestinal fold. A half a teaspoon of potassium bicarbonate sprinkled on cereal or dissolved in fruit juice should be as safe as anything in our life. It can be obtained through Google as a wine additive. Several teaspoons would be necessary to reach the potassium intake of South American Indians. The only danger I know of is that it will trigger heart disease of beri-beri if vitamin B-1 is deficient (see http://charles_w.tripod.com/kandthiamin.ht ml ).
|
Did you find this post helpful?