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foot discomfort

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I have been experiencing a sensation in the balls or metatarsal area feeling almost like it does when you foot fall asleep due to circulation from crossing you legs. It is to the point of being constant and more noticeable when my feet are elevated.
My toes feel numb at times as well.
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replied June 14th, 2011
Especially eHealthy
Dbaseball,

You could have a few things going on. You do not say if you are diabetic. If you are, you could be developing a diabetic neuropathy. Which could cause your feet to feel numb or have areas of a pins and needles feeling. But, if you are not diabetic, you could still have a neuropathy, but from a different etiology.

There is a disorder called metatarsalgia, which can cause pain in the ball of the foot, at the region of the metatarsal heads.

Another problem, Morton's neuroma, can cause numbness and tingling in the web spaces or toes.

These conditions can occur together.

There is a specifically shaped pad (metatarsal pad) that can be put in the shoes that sometimes helps the problem.

If it is bothering your daily activities, or you are just uncomfortable, you may want to see a podiatrist or an orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon.

Good luck.
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replied June 15th, 2011
I am not Diabetic.
Can I get a bit more information on metatarsalgia?
Thank you.
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replied June 16th, 2011
Especially eHealthy
Metatarsalgia is a common overuse injury described as pain in the forefoot associated with increased stress over the metatarsal head region. Metatarsalgia often is referred to as a symptom, rather than as a specific disease. Common causes of metatarsalgia include interdigital neuroma, metatarsophalangeal synovitis, avascular necrosis, sesamoiditis, and inflammatory arthritis; however, these causes often are diagnosed separately.

Body weight is transferred by gravity to the foot. This transfer of force is increased to the forefoot during the midstance and push-off phases of walking and running. In the forefoot region, the first and second metatarsal heads receive the greatest amount of this energy transfer. Peak vertical forces reach 275% of body weight during running. A runner may absorb 110 tons per foot while running 1 mile. Pressure studies have shown that runners spend most of the time weighted over the forefoot while running.

Athletes who take part in high-impact sports involving running or jumping are at high risk of forefoot injury. While track and field runners are exposed to the highest level of traumatic forces to the forefoot, many other athletes, including tennis, football, baseball, and soccer players, often present with forefoot injuries.


Causes -

• The foot frequently is injured during sports activities.
• As in many other overuse syndromes, the condition may be the result of an alteration in normal biomechanics that has caused an abnormal weight distribution among the metatarsal heads.
• Persistent stress can lead to chronic irritation and inflammation of the periosteum and adjacent tissues.
• The following factors can contribute to excessive localized pressure over the forefoot:
o High level of activity
o Prominent metatarsal heads
o Tight toe extensors
o Weak toe flexors
o Hammertoe deformity
o Hypermobile first ray
o Tight Achilles tendon
o Excessive pronation


History -

• The primary symptom of metatarsalgia is pain at one or more of the metatarsal heads. Diffuse forefoot pain and midfoot pain are often present in athletes with combinations of high-impact inflammatory conditions.
• Pain typically is aggravated during the midstance and propulsion phases of walking or running.
• A history of gradual chronic onset is more common than acute presentation. Chronic symptoms may be of gradual onset over 6 months.
• Morton neuroma (interdigital neuroma) produces symptoms of metatarsalgia due to irritation and inflammation of the digital nerve located in the web space between the metatarsal heads. Patients with Morton neuroma may complain of toe numbness, in addition to pain in the forefoot.


Physical -

• Palpable point tenderness at the distal end of the plantar metatarsal fat pad is a typical finding.
• Absence of pain in the interdigital space helps assess for the presence of a neuroma.
• Pain and tenderness are experienced on the plantar surface of the metatarsal head, which often is accompanied by the development of a callus formation (plantar keratosis).
• Patients with interdigital neuroma have maximal tenderness between the web spaces.
• Loss of sensation may be present in adjacent toes.
• In patients with interdigital neuromas, pain usually is aggravated by the metatarsal squeeze test.
• Compression between the metatarsal heads may produce a painful click, known as a Mulder sign.



You can get more information if you google metatarsalgia. There are several sites which give more details (than can be provided in this space) and provide guidance on treatment. Hope this helps some. Good luck.
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replied July 11th, 2011
Foot Problems
I have had this problem for years. Mainly in the summer I get these tiny puss bubbles on the bottom of my feet. They itch like crazy until I pop them. They are usually about the size of the bottom of the pin on a push pin. But can get bigger. When I pop them clear puss comes out. I have tried to find out what they are but no luck. Any information would help.

Thanks!
itchy Feet.
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replied July 11th, 2011
I have had this problem for years. Mainly in the summer I get these tiny puss bubbles on the bottom of my feet. They itch like crazy until I pop them. They are usually about the size of the bottom of the pin on a push pin. But can get bigger. When I pop them clear puss comes out. I have tried to find out what they are but no luck. Any information would help.

Thanks!
itchy Feet.
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