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Feeling of blood rushing to head

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My daughter who is 13 years old,and has severe asthma, has been having these "blood rushing" episodes on and off for a few years. She explains that it feels like she is standing on her head and all of the blood rushes to her head and feels like she could pass out, but doesnt, happens alot when she tries to lay down.Its rather discomforting to her,and SCARY. This happened 2 years ago the doctor said it was a "virus" maybe vertigo,and that it should go away on its own in a few weeks, and now its back again.She is just getting over an ear infection this past week, but the last time she had these episodes she did not have any ear problems.She also has some pain and soreness in her rib cage area on both sides.The last time about a year ago she had the same rib cage pain,the doctor said she pulled a muscle or strained it, now thats coming back again too.Just got back from Drs and he thinks she is having anxiety. Bp is 88 over 50.She is 5'2 105lbs.Does this sound like anxiety?


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replied May 24th, 2009
Anxiety and Stress Answer A6645
Hmm - these seem to be more medical questions than psychological ones. Yes, anxiety can raise BP, can make some people feel faint, nauseous, trembly, shaky, can even cause chest pains. As well, there are always the secondary complications - feeling embarrassed, ashamed, even fearful. So there are physical symptoms that can be generated by anxiety. I recommend seeking the help of two professionals - your primary care physician (in case these are purely medical/physical issues) and a psychologist (who can deal with the anxiety, if this is the cause of the medical problems).





Keep careful records; encourage your daughter to share and record her symptoms; take these notes to your professional.


Thanks for your question.


Dr Jeff














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