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Dynamic hip screw removal

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Im due to go in to hospital to have an OP to remove hip screw and plate from my hip,I fractured my hip nearly 2 years ago,my doctor says the bones are fully healed but im getting a lot of pain in my hip and groin, he says the pain and discomfort would be coming from the plate and screw.Could you tell me please what the recovery time might after this operation? THANK YOU
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First Helper User Profile Gaelic
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replied March 8th, 2012
Especially eHealthy
Brian74,

Removal of hardware will usually take care of a patient's pain, if the pain is being caused by the hardware. However, the patient does have to go into the surgery with realistic expectations. If the pain is not being caused by the hardware, the pain will not be any better, and could even be worsened by the surgery. That said...


It usually takes about 6 weeks for the body to fill in the holes left by the hardware removal. With the DHS (dynamic hip screw), there is a BIG hole left in the femoral neck. The smaller holes on the side of the femoral shaft are not as large.

The holes act as stress risers. Which means that they are weak spots in the bone, that can make a fracture easier. Just like perforations in a paper make it easier to tear, the holes in the bone can make it easier to break.

So, most surgeons will have the patient use crutches for a period of time. Then, no impact loading, twisting, jumping, running, etc till the holes have filled in.

Weight bearing will be up to the surgeon, depending upon how strong he/she feels the bone is. Some cases, the patient only has to use the crutches till the soreness from the surgery is gone. Other times, the surgeon may want the patient partial weight bearing for the whole six weeks. Again, that is totally up to the surgeon.


Good luck on your upcoming surgery. Hope that it takes your pain down.
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replied March 8th, 2012
Thanks Gaelic for ur reply, hopefully the pain goes down after the OP. Cheers Brian74
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replied April 7th, 2013
recovery from hip replacements
Hi im a 38 yr old male, and i just had a full hip replacement done 11 wks ago.I have been out walking half a mile a day on flat ground for the past 2-3 wks,when i start walking i get a bit of tightness in my knee, then it eases up after a while.This sometimes happens when im walking around the house, and i would sit down and move my knee up and down untill it cracks,then it goes away.Is this tightness in my knee to be expected? Im also thinking about joining a gym to use an exercise bike, and do a fitness course at the gym designed for people who have a medical conditions that affect everyday life.Is this to early to think about doing this? BRAVO 74
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replied April 7th, 2013
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Brian74,

If you have had a total hip replacement, unless your surgeon has limited your activities, it is never too early to get into a strengthening program. It should also include an aerobic conditioning program, along with a weight management program.

At this young of an age, it is extremely important for you to stay as strong as possible (and to manage your weight).

You have to be strong to be able to protect your prosthesis.



So, it sounds like a great idea. Protect your prosthesis. Manage your weight. Stay as strong as possible and get into a great aerobic program.

Good luck.
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