Medical Questions > Mental Health > Depression Forum

Depression and suicidal thoughts (Page 1)

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Do you know how doctors define clinical depression? Learn more about this brain disorder and types of depression that doctors diagnose here....
Can depression run in families? Can hormones really make you depressed? Yes! Learn more about causes and conditions of clinical depression here....
People with depressive illnesses do not all experience the same symptoms. Do you know the signs and symptoms of depression? Read on to learn more....
I think suicide is not a solution to any of the problem in this world.So why comit it.
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replied June 2nd, 2011
Sometimes, people feel that they can't get out of a situation and that death is the only way out.
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replied June 26th, 2011
Yes I think you are right.
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replied November 28th, 2011
There are situations when death seems preferable, and it is preferable.
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replied November 9th, 2009
One of the way to deal with depression is try and keep yourself busy. Try to think positive even when things happening around you are negative. I know this is difficult but then depression is not a small problem anyway.
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Users who thank mac38 for this post: foreversad 

replied July 4th, 2011
Meditation and to be in nature is the best way to be out of depression.
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replied July 11th, 2011
Depression is the disease of ego...
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replied September 14th, 2011
I agree, I believe that all thoughts eiher come from the ego and are based in fear and anger (very selfcentered in nature) or from a spiritual place that promotes love peace and joy.. all neg thoughts r generated by the ego, to keep us miserable, and all pos thoughts are a choice coming from love, peace and joy
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replied November 9th, 2009
Because of work tension and other family problems, people feel depression. So people have to do yoga daily . It is very good treatment for depression. Also we have to talk with our friends and enjoy with interesting topics. So by that people can reduce their depression.
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replied November 10th, 2009
That's right largine. Yoga is perhaps one of the finest treatments for all the problems human body faces whether it is mental or physical. All you need is give some time to your body and everything will start falling into place.
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Users who thank mac38 for this post: MaryAJoe 

replied November 10th, 2009
very useful article i would like to appreciate for sharing with us.
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replied November 11th, 2009
I would appreciate even more Rebecca if you could put in some useful advice over here.
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replied November 16th, 2009
Experienced User
Thank you for taking this position.

I do understand that some people are in a lot of pain. I became concerned about one person in particular--a 13-year-old girl who posted on this site about her desire to kill herself.

I pm her. I heard no response. It can create quite a lot of concern.
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replied March 14th, 2010
hello, new here, not sure where to go in all the forums, so thought I'd start here. I have depression and anxiety disorders (some doc said I have bipolar). I don't know who to go to anymore. The medication mgmt (psychiatrist) didn't seem to care much, left her. Personal doc same thing. The doctors don't seem to want to take the time to listen and don't care. I guess they have too many patients. I take Effexor XR and Klonopin. I'm good when I take it, but sometimes I forget and that's when things get bad for me. I feel like finding a black hole somewhere in my mind to hide and want to avoid the world and my family. Thoughts of uselessness and why am I here anyway always come to mind. I wish I didn't exist. What's the point? The only things I have going for me to live is my son & husband. But still, why me? What's my purpose and why should I bother? I'm TIRED ALL the time and have no energy (even when I'm taking my meds) and if it weren't for my part time job I would stay in bed ALL day. That's no joke. Depression sucks, but when I have an episode I feel like that's my place to be and don't want to leave. I know the right thing to do is take my meds, but my mind tells me no. Why bother. I am in a constant struggle with myself and my family suffers for it. I need help. Therapists don't help and psychiatrists are a joke. A friend told me Prozac gave her energy back and she wasn't tired anymore. I also have Gastrointestinal problems that affect me, of which I need to see someone about, but haven't. This adds to my problems. Depression sucks! I am believe this a way of life for me. This is the way I am, there is no "normal" here. Don't worry be happy, yea right! What is normal anyway. Maybe I'm meant to be this way, I couldn't imagine being any different. Thanks for listening to me rant.
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replied April 7th, 2010
This is very nice information because it is useful for every person who will be feel alone. Thus i am thinking that it''s useful for depression.
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replied May 6th, 2010
Experienced User
What do you do in a case where depression is as a result of an incurable disease that you have,HPV in my case, which prevents you from ever having a loving relationship with someone ever again.
When after all it is in our nature to want to feel loved.
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replied May 11th, 2010
Experienced User
Depression is a disease, a mental affliction. Getting the right depression treatment at the right time is vitally important. To someone suffering from depression, it is not only extremely stressful for the patient themselves but also people who are concern about them, especially their good friends and relatives. I have looked Puhchiana that provides Best neurosurgeon, best neurosurgical hospital dedicated to the individual need of each patient.
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replied May 11th, 2010
I wanted to look at the depression forum because i though it'd make me feel so alone, all these suicide threats are scaring the hell out of me and making it even worse.
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replied September 14th, 2011
If they r scaring you, maybe u r afraid that it may b a reality. But I think it could also make u more grateful that u dont feel this way. When I was in my teens I picked up drinking and drugs as a way to cope wih feelings I couldnt or didnt want to feel.. this worked for a while but backfired eventually.. I began to attempt suicide, finally nearly succeeded and at that point was forced to ge help which led me to AA.. changed my life completely.. hope ur okay hon.. big hugs
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replied June 13th, 2010
When reading the below, please remember that I am NOT A DOCTOR -- I AM A PATIENT JUST LIKE YOU. Before I say anything else, let me say this:

STOPPING YOUR MEDICATIONS OR TINKERING WITH YOUR MEDS CAN BE REALLY DANGEROUS! TAKE THEM EXACTLY AS YOUR DOCTOR PRESCRIBED. IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM WITH ANY OF THEM, TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT IT and do what he or she says.

For the last 14 years, I have had recurring episodes of severe, totally disabling clinical depression, each lasting between 4 and 14 months. In recent years, the episodes were getting longer and closer together. It seemed to me that I was looking at spending the rest of my life in severe clinical depression, not a bright thought, and one that caused me to actually regret being in pretty good physical shape (I am a jogger when well), because it might mean that I would have to live at least another 20 years or so, suffering daily, under these conditions.

(Suicide is not an option for me because, among other reasons, I have a wife and family to consider.) What right do I have, I reasoned, to emotionally scar my children for life, just because I had a virtually intolerable condition? So, I’d say to myself, something like: “Well, your life is effectively over, but that doesn’t mean you have the right to inflict your misery forever on the ones you love.” So, I decided I would just “tough it out,” no matter how bad it got—or how long it lasted.

I have been through at least 6 psychiatrists, have tried all of the commonly prescribed meds, including even some anti-psychotics that are sometimes prescribed “off-label,” for treatment-resistant depression. Nothing was helping me, until I found THE COMPLETE ANSWER (at least for me).

It's called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Therapy (TMS). On 2/2/10, I walked into the Lindner Center of Hope, in Mason Ohio, (see their website). At that time, I was not able to drive safely and could barely find my way into the parking lot.

After a series of 32 TMS treatments, one-a-day for six-weeks, I am in 100% complete remission. They gave me my life back. I personally consider this new treatment to be a Miracle from God, but it's a recent scientific medical breakthrough that, I predict, will revolutionize the treatment of "treatment-
resistant” depression.

I am back to 100% normal and went from being 100% disabled to 100% able through these treatments (gradually, over a period of 6 weeks). It's not a scam or a money-making gimmick--it's for real. It works--at least it did for me, when NOTHING else did, including shock treatments, a virtual pharmacy of meds, talk therapy, exercise, meditation, etc.

I have had three "shock" treatments that did not help. What I'm am talking about is nothing like “shock treatments,” which shock the whole brain, cause a seizure, unconsciousness, and, at least for me, severe (especially short-term) memory loss. After three shock treatments, I was a total zombie, could not even read a book, and so I refused to have any more treatments. Look—if they work for you, and they must for some people—more power to you. I’m just telling you my experience.

TMS, on the other hand, targets the specific part of the brain thought to control mood and depression. This is about a 2.5 inch area near the left front of your brain called the left prefrontal cortex. During each treatment, between 3,000 and 4,000 electromagnetic pulses are passed through your skull to that target area only.

My amateur understanding is that the pulses create a magnetic field in just that part of the cortex, which stimulates the neurons in that area only (which has been identified as the small part of your brain that controls mood and depression). I think I have read that this technology was developed from the
discovery that TMS pulses could be used for “brain mapping,” that is, determining which physical sections of your brain control things like finger movement, speech, the sense of hearing and touch, and so forth.

This was proven to me at the beginning: they ask you to hold your right hand (forearm only) up with your thumb out like a hitchhiker, only to completely relax it. The psychiatrist moves the magnetic coil in miniscule amounts until a single pulse from the machine involuntarily makes your thumb (and sometimes your jaw) twitch. (It really does, all by itself.) That tells them exactly where on the “brain map” the coil is placed. From there, the position of the left prefrontal cortex is calculated, and the exact target position is identified. This is no low-tech procedure—it’s “cutting-edge” and revolutionary and recent.

TMS treatments do cause some mild discomfort only when the magnetic pulses are being delivered, which they are in intervals lasting about five seconds each, between which nothing happens for about 30 seconds, so you have time to rest. For example, I would much rather get a TMS treatment than to go to the dentist or even to get a haircut (which I’ve always hated).

On the other hand, after my experience with three ECT, or shock treatments, I would not submit to another for any amount of money in the world. Again, this may be different for you—I’m just talking about my own experience.

While the pulses are being delivered (they feel like a woodpecker is pecking on just that part of your head), there is some facial twitching and talking is virtually impossible. The “pecking” sound the machine makes is 80 decibels—so loud that both you and the nurse in the room wear earplugs during the treatments. With the earplugs, the sound is quite tolerable.

You are fully awake and in-between the pulses, can talk (I talked the poor nurses a blue streak, probably boring them to death, simply because it made the 36-40 minute treatment sessions seem to virtually “fly” past, and before I knew it, they were done for the day.) Just before the actual delivery of the magnetic pulses to the target area, the machine plays a little musical scale, to let you know they’re coming.

The only side-effects I noticed were a very mild headache that followed every session and a period of mild disorientation that lasted about half an hour, so that I had to be more careful driving back (to my hotel) than I was driving to the treatment center. I soon discovered that even the mild headache vanished within an hour or so, if I took 600 mg of Ibuprofin as soon as I returned to the hotel and also ate a meal. The headache went away every time I did this.

If you think you are in my situation, you owe it to yourself to exhaustively research TMS and then act on it, as I did.

TMS is the first non-surgical, non-medical treatment for depression that was approved by the FDA (in 2008), since "shock" treatments were introduced in the 30s. It's so new--not many people seem to know about it (including many medical insurance companies, who consider it “experimental”).

After a long battle of denials and appeals from my insurer (you can appeal any denial), including letters of medical necessity from two different psychiatrists and an arm-twisting phone call to my insurance company from one of them, after months of determined effort, a series of denials and appeals, my insurance company pre-approved coverage at 80%, on a reimbursement basis. That means that you have to pay up-front for the treatments (About $9000., in 3 installments), and then file medical reimbursement claims with your insurer who pays you back later. I am now receiving thousands of dollars in reimbursement checks from my insurer. I used virtually my last money for these treatments, and I'm glad that I did.

Again, I can only speak for myself. Your results could be different. Just look into it.

You can gain approval on the coverage before you pay anything, if you are willing to do as I did and not give up--the problem is that TMS is so new that the insurance companies have, at least in the past, typically denied coverage on the basis that it is an experimental procedure.

I eventually got coverage pre-approved before I started the treatments or
paid a dime. This allowed me to proceed.

Please visit the Neurostar Website--they are the only manufacturer of the TMS machine in the U.S.

This is for-real and it works. I am now receiving reimbursement checks for 80% of the money I had to pay by filing simple claims with my insurance company. The more people who do this, the more they will consider the treatment non-experimental and will hopefully start to pre-approve coverage routinely. The insurance companies will eventually recognize that they are saving money in the long run, when compared to covering endless rounds of meds, doctor visits, traffic accident injuries caused by people driving while confused and depressed, very expensive shock treatments, hospitalizations, and treatment for people who have had failed suicide attempts.

The Lindner Center of Hope is affiliated with the Medical School of the University of Cincinnati. Clinical trials on TMS are now being conducted (and have been for a while) in places including Harvard University's School of Medicine, the Johns Hopkins University, MUSC (the Medical Center of the University of South Carolina, and elsewhere).

I was told by Neurostar that the centers with the most experience in TMS clinical trials are Columbia University's School of Medicine (their Brain Stimulation Laboratory) and MUSC's Brain Studies Laboratory.

I spoke with a researcher at Columbia University's Brain Stimulation Laboratory, and she told me that if a relapse occurs, it can almost always be reversed by a week or so of about five "maintenance treatments." In a few cases, she said, a single treatment was enough. I asked her if she knew whether there was a "burnout effect," in other words, "a law of diminishing returns" where the treatments have less and less effect (as I've found to be the case with meds) over years of repeated use. She answered that, in nearly 20 years of clinical trials, they have seen NO evidence of that.

IMPORTANT NOTE: If you have thoughts or urges to commit suicide, please just realize that they are merely one of the symptoms of this awful,
physiologically-based illness. Those thoughts will vanish when you are well, and your outlook will do a 180 degree turnaround, at least that is my own experience. So, about suicide--JUST DON'T DO IT—make yourself realize that these thoughts and urges are simply a symptom of the illness, just a part of the package, nothing more--and dismiss them.

You don’t really want to be dead, anyway, you want to be well. If you follow my advice, I think that there’s a good chance that will happen. The suffering doesn’t have to continue. There is a way out--at least it worked for me. I can't guarantee that this will be the answer for you--they tell me it varies from patient-to-patient--Neurostar says that 1 out of three patients experience complete remission, and that 1 out of 2 have significant relief. In my opinion, these stats are conservative.

Interestingly, Newsweek recently ran an excellent article on ‘double-blind” studies using the most commonly-prescribed antidepressants, called SSRIs, vs a control group receiving placebos. Those studies showed just a slight increase in improvement in the patients who received the actual drugs instead of the sugar-pill. These antidepressants seem to take an awfully long time to work, if they do, and who knows whether you might have gotten better by then anyway?

By the way, I’d say that this treatment is probably just for patients who, like me, had severe, “treatment-resistant” depression. If the meds (or even shock treatments) work for you, as they seem to do for some people at some times, and you’re willing to put-up with the side effects, count your blessings and more power to you.

But, if you knew what I've been through during the last fourteen years, the thousands of dollars I've spent on psychiatrists, meds, and treatments of other kinds, well--the list is extensive, and I was still a walking zombie.

Two final points: I’ve seen advertised on the internet some sort of magnetic gadget they want you to buy that’s supposed to relieve depression by delivering magnetic waves to your head, that you can use yourself, in the comfort of your own home. I’ve never tried those things, so I don’t know, but I suspect that they don’t work and that the sellers of such items (IN MY
OPINION) just want you to pay the $100. or so for the gadget. As I said, I have researched the whole treatment range thoroughly, and in my reading, I’ve never seen a reference from a reliable source that says they work.

The TMS machine is no simple gadget. I was told that they cost $50,000 each (I would’ve guessed more). After painstakingly identifying the location on your head of the target area at the beginning, the psychiatrist programs the chair’s own computer so that its movable parts hold you in that exact position, which, as I understand it, is individually programmed in the chair FOR EACH PATIENT.

During the entire treatment procedure, the nurse watches a screen at her own computer, to make sure your head hasn’t moved off the target area, which is checked for accuracy using a laser beam. Your head is held in position by a support on the right side and by the magnetic coil on the left, so that it’s not supposed to move at all. (The chair is supposed to shut itself off if it senses the target area has moved, but that never happened to me.) All of this sounds uncomfortable, but it’s not in the least. Your head is held immobile, but in a comfortable, relaxed position, and the treatments are applied while
the chair is reclining you comfortably with your feet held up. I was told that some patients even fall asleep during the treatments, but I never did. I just talked to the nurse to make the time go by faster.

There is another treatment that apparently works, even for many of the very worst cases: A Vegal Nerve Stimulation Implant—a surgical procedure wherein an electronic device (almost like a pacemaker) delivers electrical stimulation to a nerve in the back of your neck called the Vegal Nerve.

I have read a book written by a patient whose severe episodes of clinical depression lasted for as long as five years at a time, and who got total relief using this procedure. (The book is called: OUT OF THE BLACK HOLE.) The only problem is, the procedure and follow-up maintenance costs about $30,000. and to my knowledge, no one has ever been successful in getting an insurance company to bear even part of the cost. Also, it takes about a year to work, if I understand correctly, and it doesn’t work at all for some
patients. One of my psychiatrists told me that he had five patients who had undergone this procedure. Out of the five, three were apparently helped a lot, one was unaffected, and the fifth actually asked to be un-implanted.

So, you might ask, if TMS is so great, why doesn’t my psychiatrist
recommend it? Again, in my opinion, there are two reasons: some of these doctors went to med school, etc., more than 20 years ago, and they weren’t taught about it and haven’t kept up with the latest developments.

A lot of psychiatrists DO know about it, but they also know that TMS is not readily available and probably won’t be covered by your insurance, at least without some long-drawn out battle, as I had to go through. They are correct in that TMS is not readily available—unless you’re lucky enough to live near one of the 14 (I believe) centers in the U.S. currently offering the treatment. On their website, Neurostar has a program that allows you to find the closest provider to you.

Listen to me. After fourteen years of struggling with this illness, watching my family life, financial well-being, and ability to enjoy ANYTHING deteriorate around me, while I suffered helplessly, every single day, for periods of more than a year at a time; after going through doctor after doctor—I’ve lost count how many, really—I came away with this opinion:

There is a wide range of competence, knowledge-base, and treatment approaches among the group we call psychiatrists. Realize that they are not gods. They don’t know everything, and you are not at their mercy. There are good ones and bad ones. Keep searching until you find one of the good ones, who is up-to-date on the very latest clinical studies. This is not too much to ask of someone who purports to be a specialist.

In my case, the closest TMS provider to me was a four-hour-drive to a different state, where I had to stay in a hotel for the entire six weeks and be away from my family, etc. My wife was motivated enough that she negotiated a special long-term rate at a very nice place near the Lindner Center, for a fraction of what they normally charge on a per-night basis.

Look, even after all of this, when I went in for the treatments I was skeptical. I gave it maybe a 30% chance of working, I guessed—after all—nothing else had worked for me, why would this? But I was so desperate, I had nothing to lose. At the end of the second week of treatments, I noticed that my long-gone appetite was returning. By the end of the fourth week, I conservatively estimated my improvement at 50%. By the end of the fifth week, my estimate was of an 80% improvement. Midway through the sixth week, I realized that I was completely better—100% remission, and that has continued ever since then, despite being in some quite stressful life circumstances.

By the way, one final point—on the subject of meds--AND THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT:

My psychiatrist at the Lindner Center of Hope, in Mason,
Ohio, told me to just keep taking whatever I’ve been taking and not to worry about it. If you’re better or not, be very careful about stopping your meds. At the end, when I was all better, I asked him why I should keep taking all
these psych meds: (80 mg/da prozac/60 mg/day Cymbalta/150 mg/da Nuvigil/3mg/da Clonazapam/10 mg/da Ambien, if they’re not helping, cost a lot of money, and have a few unwanted (sexual, in my case) side-effects. He said that I could probably, VERY SLOWLY, taper-off one-at-a-time. YOU DON’T WANT TO ROCK THE BOAT. He suggested I start with taking 30 mg of Cymbalta instead of 60, and leave the rest alone, until my psychiatrist at home told me to taper some more.

By tapering slowly, I’m talking about doing it via my doctor’s advice, and it will probably be 1-2 years before I’m off of most of this stuff. I don’t know if I can ever get off Ambien, because sleep is vitally important to stay mentally healthy. When I’ve tried to get off the benzodiazapene tranquizers, such as Clonazepam, Ativan, Xanex, etc., (which are all quite addictive, in the long term), I absolutely could not do it when I was depressed. However, during the times when I was better, it was a “piece of cake” IF YOU DO IT SLOWLY ENOUGH.

With your doctor’s approval, you make out a reasonable taper schedule and stick to it, unless the discomfort becomes too great—then level off for a while. It doesn’t matter if it takes you a year or two to taper off these things, as long as you’re working in the right direction.

Back to the antidepressants, I really hate to even bring this up, because, if you’re like I was, and you’re miserable, you want to go all-out, gung-ho, and fix the whole problem today! It’s simply not possible to do it quickly. Stopping any of your meds suddenly or too fast could put you in the hospital or worse. So, I’m taking my doctor’s advice, and tapering very slowly, just one at a time—a process that might take two years, but what does that matter if you're well?

In my (non-professional!) opinon, if you are severely depressed, what you need is to have is your left prefrontal cortex (only) stimulated electromagnetically, using TMS. But, stopping your meds on your own is
not the answer, and it could be quite dangerous!

By the way, the inability to enjoy anything—not your favorite book or movie, not what used to be your favorite food or activity, not your spouse or children, not even a television show, is a symptom of severe depression called anhedonia.

It is an established scientific fact that anhedonia is a common symptom of severe clinical depression. In my case, it was impossible to enjoy ANYTHING, not experience a single moment of pleasure of any kind, for periods lasting up to fourteen months.

Anhedonia is not a come-and-go kind of symptom. It means that, for example, for periods lasting over a year at a time, it was impossible to experience a moment of pleasure of any kind, for every minute of every single day. Not wanting to inflict my misery upon others, I was, therefore, forced to pretend to be having a good time during my children’s birthday parties, visits from friends, and so on. This, in itself, was exhausting.

I have no "axe to grind"--I have no payment arrangements to endorse this treatment. I'm just trying to help others who have suffered like me.

Wishing you a speedy recovery—I know what you’re going through—

“louis1888”
Out of Denial, Kentucky
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replied June 16th, 2010
To all,

be aware that life is dynamic and everything changes. You might feel extremely unhappy now. But realize that you can improve this. Obviously you always need to discuss with your doctor first. Your depression might have a fysical reason.

I have been quite depressed myself. I got out of it tahnks to my employer. They forced me into management trainings in order to help improve the company. One day I realized that the approach for improving our company is not that different from improving my own life....

Think about you being the manager of your life. You are the CEO and defines strategy (what do you want, what are your strengths/weaknesses), what is the current state, what needs to happen to reach the goals. Difficult, nope.... not rocketscience. An example:

I am depressed because I have no relation, no friends? I can improve my life enourmously by just getting new social contacts this year. How do I do that? Well, let's invite some colleagues for a dinner, or let go and take dancing classes, or lets joing a sportclub.

Again very simple but extremely effective. Your actions become guided and no longer self destructive and negative. The moment you take a first time out to review your life and constructively think about ways to improve, you have a good chance of feeling better straight away. You change the negative into a positive perspective.

Wish you all the best!

David O' Guilvy
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replied November 10th, 2011
Hi

I’ve want to share my experience about anxiety and depression. I suffer for a long time.But when i take Amoryn at Brain Research Supplement .My confident in my self is totally back. I feel I’m a new man now.
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replied June 18th, 2010
Nice.. to be able to go to a DR. I had a hysterectomy five yrs ago, I take nothing! I have no meds because I have no Health Care... depressed? You bet I am! Anxiety, dizziness, insomnia. . ugh
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replied June 18th, 2010
You can enroll in free clinical trials using TMS to treat depression. See www.clinicaltrials.gov

louis1888
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replied June 19th, 2010
info
Thank you for the info.. I have tried enrolling in the past with no success. Bless you for trying
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replied July 14th, 2010
Depression problem solve by meditation
mac38 wrote:
I would appreciate even more Rebecca if you could put in some useful advice over here.

If you’re suffering from major depression, antidepressant medication may relieve some of your symptoms. Antidepressants aren’t a silver bullet for depression, and they come with their own side effects and dangers. Plus, recent studies have raised questions about their effectiveness.

Learning the facts about antidepressants and weighing the benefits against the risks can help you make an informed and personal decision about whether medication is right for you.

This information is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice. If you are taking an antidepressant, do not change your dosage without consulting your physician!

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replied July 19th, 2010
The Range

There does come time for major change,
Seems harder than Blaxland crossing The Range.
When it’s hardest you face a future,
That has no script and you have no teacher.

So without haste you venture forth,
Wishing someone else had set the course.
The truth is that we all really know,
This truly is no one else’s show.

Many have been here, done this dance,
Though there are many different circumstance.
We can only hope to learn from each other,
Listen to advice, be it from a friend or brother.

The course we’re on belongs to one,
At times it burns like the desert sun,
The next day might dawn so bold,
Before things turn, you’re left so cold.

All at once there is a new light,
Many freeze like deer, stunned with fright.
Is it true, can this day deliver,
A life anew, flowing faster than a river?

So do what you can to move on forward,
Take that first step, don’t be a coward,
Breathe in deeply and embrace the change,
Fight for your life to get over The Range.
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replied July 21st, 2010
Hello there! I think also that suicide is not the right thing to do when your depress with something. Before you try to do that thing try to think a couple of times. Don't let the depressions within you.
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