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CT scans

A doctor/technician at a radiology clinic told me the dose of radiation from a CT scan is only the same as you'd get flying on a plane, but in articles on the net I read it's equivalent to hundreds of xrays! What's the real truth please?
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replied September 5th, 2008
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Radiation dosage from CT procedures varies from patient to patient. A particular radiation dose will depend on the size of the body part examined, the type of procedure, and the type of CT equipment and its operation. The effective doses from diagnostic CT procedures are typically estimated to be in the range of 1 to 10 mSv. There is a risk of cancer developing as a result, but it is very small. The FDA has evaluated the risks in a table that appears on their website.

Are you getting a CT scan soon?
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replied September 5th, 2008
No I was there getting an MRI scan after I requested it be changed from the original CT scan recommended to me (after reading articles on the web about the cancer risk from CT scans, and estimates of "megadoses" between 150 and 500 xrays. One survey asked 20 doctors what their estimates of the radiation doses from CT scans were, and their responses varied from under one xray equivalent to over 500! )
Btw my doctor tried to talk me out of the MRI scan based on financial reasons "It'll cost hundreds of dollars more!" The cost was $300 for the MRI. Quoted cost for the CT scan? $300. At the clinic I was told my doctor was well known there, and had
referred many patients to them. How then can his estimates of the costs be so far off the mark?
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replied September 9th, 2008
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Interesting ...
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